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Topic: How do I permanently stabilize my travel trailer?

Posted By: dansblkonblkz06 on 10/29/09 06:47am

I have a new travel trailer that I want to permanently stabilize on my lot. I've heard that you should remove the tires so that they don't rot. How do I stabilze the trailer so that the tires can be removed? Do I simply put jacks on each axle?
Thanks


Posted By: RRUGG on 10/29/09 06:53am

Years ago people put their trailers on cement blocks rather than using the trailer stabilizers but, years ago, trailers usually didn't have stabilizers.


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Posted By: mainetom on 10/29/09 07:11am

Think I would invest in some cement blocks, enough for one every 4 feet or so all the way around, not just at the corners. Use shims and level it to your satisfaction, then re-check it periodically, esp. after winter if heaving from freezing/thawing is an issue. Before doing that, though, I would lay down some kind of moisture barrier.


Posted By: vanman250 on 10/29/09 07:13am

Cement block with a piece of wood between the block and the frame. I know people that left the tires on and people that took them off and they all dry rotted.

vanman250


Posted By: I am still wayne_tw on 10/29/09 07:22am

Your trailer should be put on concrete blocks just like a mobile home. I don't know the length of the trailer, but at least piers at the very front, before the axles, and then, depending on length, either a pier between the end of the rear and the axles or a pier just behind the axles and another at the very end of the frame. Also, depending on the length, a pier may be necessary between the very front and the axles. The tongue should not old any weight after the piers are holding the trailer. The axles likewise should not hold any weight, either. Use pressure treated wood between the top of the concrete block pier and frame and wooden wedges for the final adjustment. Use two wedges per pier one on top of the other so the frame rests on a flat surface. Hammer the wedges tight before releasing the jack(s) from the trailer.


Posted By: tafische on 10/29/09 07:50am

If you are going to store it long term, I would think either way the tires are going to have to be replaced. If they are in good shape, see if you can sell them maybe? If it were me, I would leave them on because I would not want them taking up space somewhere else. Also - If you had a failure of your stabilizing system, you have less distance to fall.


Posted By: revrnd on 10/29/09 04:24pm

Kwattro wrote:

The moment I remove the wheels from my TT while it's on my lot, my TT's insurance becomes VOID. Will yours? Check the policy.

So long as the wheels are touching the ground it still classified as a recreational vehicle, that includes completely placing the trailer on blocks to remove all weight from the suspension, so long as the tires touch. Otherwise it becomes a fixed dwelling and must be insured as such.


Also, your municipality may have bylaws prohibiting permanent placement of a trailer. I know my parents had to leave the wheels on their mobile home, even though the trailer was skirted. This was due to a township bylaw prohibiting putting a foundation under a trailer.

I'm not sure what the tire condition was like when the folks sold the trailer.


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Posted By: Housted on 10/29/09 09:44am

I have a TT on a permanent site and I used the built in stabilizers and 4 of these --> Screw top jacks.
I bought cement stepping stones to use as pads under the 8 jacks. They have worked well for 4 years. Adjustable for changes in the soil over time. BTW, I left the tires and wheels in place with most all the weight removed.

Housted

* This post was edited 10/29/09 02:15pm by Housted *


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Posted By: Guest on 10/29/09 11:01am

May want to look into wind tie down straps too. Even construction trailers around here het those nowadays. Adds a lot of wind resistance capacity to a trailer.


Posted By: opnspaces on 10/29/09 08:58pm

dansblkonblkz06 wrote:

thanks for all the feedback. I checked with my insurance company and sure enough the policy is void if the tires go off. I'll leave the tires on and replace then whenever I move the trailer. I'm going to put some stabilizer jacks on the axles as well as concrete blocks with wood under the main beams at several locations to better distribute the weight. I like the idea of some wind bracing too since it gets very windy on top of the mountain.


Interesting about the insurance. I would block it up off the ground so I knew the springs and tires are unloaded. Then take a shovel and pile some dirt up until the tires are touching again.


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Posted By: SteveRankin on 10/29/09 01:53pm

If you're going to stabilize it permanently, I take that to mean over 5 years. By then the tires will need to be replaced anyway and taking them off or leaving them on won't make a difference.


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Posted By: oakmandan on 10/30/09 09:19am

I had a TT on a permant site in Michigan. I used jack stands and had great success. It was on the site for 4 years and I left the tires on.

Dan


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Posted By: Kwattro on 10/29/09 10:29am

The moment I remove the wheels from my TT while it's on my lot, my TT's insurance becomes VOID. Will yours? Check the policy.

So long as the wheels are touching the ground it still classified as a recreational vehicle, that includes completely placing the trailer on blocks to remove all weight from the suspension, so long as the tires touch. Otherwise it becomes a fixed dwelling and must be insured as such.

Personally if you live anywhere there are freeze/thaw cycles I wouldn't hard block the trailer. Been there, done that. Add two stabilizers ahead of the wheels and some kind of anti-rock system between the tires and make level adjustments from time to time.


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Posted By: dansblkonblkz06 on 10/29/09 08:26pm

thanks for all the feedback. I checked with my insurance company and sure enough the policy is void if the tires go off. I'll leave the tires on and replace then whenever I move the trailer. I'm going to put some stabilizer jacks on the axles as well as concrete blocks with wood under the main beams at several locations to better distribute the weight. I like the idea of some wind bracing too since it gets very windy on top of the mountain.


Posted By: Tee Jay on 10/30/09 09:04pm

The frame is designed to have weight concentrations at the axles and tongue. Just be sure you get a strong support on both sides of the axle. As long as you get most of the weight off the axles and the springs start to relax you will mostly cure the bouncies and wigglies.

I have used blocks and treated wood, but would consider screw jacks if available (they were not locally). If you skirt the trailer the tires will last as long as they would in storage anywhere else, unless you have storage with perfect darkness, temperature and humidity. Best wishes for success.


Posted By: t429p on 10/31/09 07:09am

Not knowing what kind of lot or where it is, you might want to keep the wheels on because of flooding or other things that might make you have to move it quickly to save your TT.
just a thought
tp


dansblkonblkz06 wrote:

I have a new travel trailer that I want to permanently stabilize on my lot. I've heard that you should remove the tires so that they don't rot. How do I stabilze the trailer so that the tires can be removed? Do I simply put jacks on each axle?
Thanks



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