Good Sam Club Open Roads Forum: Dinghy Towing: Brake systems for toads--your recommendations
Open Roads Forum Already a member? Login here.   If not, Register Today!  |  Help

Newest  |  Active  |  Popular  |  RVing FAQ Forum Rules  |  Forum Help and Support  |  Contact

Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Dinghy Towing

Open Roads Forum  >  Dinghy Towing

 > Brake systems for toads--your recommendations

This Topic Is Closed  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 5  
Prev  |  Next
lanerd

Ridgecrest CA or Newport OR

Senior Member

Joined: 03/03/2003

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 09/23/10 01:16pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I can't speak for any other brand other than the one I use. I initially purchased and installed US Gear's Unified brake system mainly because my coach was pre-wired for it (as all Monaco built coaches were from a certain year). The installation on the toad was not difficult, but did take some learning curve time. I recently moved it to our present toad and the uninstall and re-install on new toad was less time than the initial install on the first toad. Installation of the monitor in the coach took about 1/2 hour (mostly to mount it) and only required the connection of two connectors

The toad has a special vacuum pump that will activate when the coach's brakes are applied. This vacuum then allows the toad's "power" brakes to be utilized rather than using brute force to apply the brake pedal. The pedal is connected to a small power module that pulls the toad's pedal. The unit is not only proportional but it is also progressive meaning that the more you brake on the coach, the more the toad brakes. The monitor informs you when you're connected and how much braking power is being applied.

Some motorhome chassis, such as certain Freightliner and Workhorse models, come prewired for a dinghy brake wiring system, as do 2007 and newer Winnebago Class A’s. Those kits don’t include the motorhome wiring harness because it’s already installed. The module incorporates a manual-activation or emergency braking lever, a gain control and a band of red LEDs illuminates in proportion to the degree of brake-activation signal being sent to the dinghy. The control module also includes solid-state inertia sensors that monitor the rig’s deceleration rateand us e that data to modulate the dinghy’s proportional braking.

The price is about $1K....not cheap, but rest assured it will provide years of trouble free toad braking. I've had mine now for three years and about 25,000 miles without a hic-up.

Hope this helps

Ron


Ron & Sandie
2013 Tiffin Phaeton 42LH Cummins ILS 400hp
Toad: 2011 GMC Terrain SLT2
Tow Bar: Sterling AT
Toad Brakes: Unified by U.S. Gear
TPMS: Pressure Pro
Member of: GS, FMCA, Allegro


RETIRED!! How sweet it is....

DSDP Don

Moorpark, Ca

Senior Member

Joined: 04/09/2005

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 09/23/10 01:23pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

My vote would be for the M&G system if you want something to operate in coordination with a DP's air system. I bought the Air Force One from SMI because my truck didn't have enough room for the M&G attachment at the master cylinder.

There are soooooo many systems out there that do all kinds of different things. It was one of the hardest decisions I ever made when I selected my brake system. Usually, you can buy the most expensive if you want all the bells and whistles, but that's not the case with the braking systems.

The air brake systems are nice and givve proportional braking, but I found on one trip that I was going down such a steep grade that I was overheating my brakes and had to get off of them. Consequently, I lost the braking in the toad. It would have been nice to be able to apply the brakes like you do on a trailer from my dash. I know some systems can do this, but they lose other features.

The Ready Brake system is good, but it's always on when decelerating when there may be times you don't want it to apply, like when a DP is able to handle the braking via the exhaust brake. I've also asked the represenatives of Ready Brake...many times....how does the Ready Brake know when the vacumn boster is out of air. The first few stops will be boosted and the rest of them won't. Anyone who has stepped on a brake pedal with the engine off knows how much harder it is to depress the brake. How does the Raedy Brake adjust to the initial braking and then unassisted braking.

I think a perfect system could be designed for both DP's and gassers, but no one has done it yet.


Don & Mary
2014 Newmar Dutch Star 4018
450 Cummins
2012 Chevrolet Silverado LTZ CrewCab 4WD
2013 Polaris RZR 800 LE


Flasho

Ocala, FL

Senior Member

Joined: 01/24/2004

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 09/23/10 01:52pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Ditto.....the U.S. Gear system. 7 years and 50,000 miles, simple and no problems.


Reinhard & Margaret,
aka, "Flash" & Maggie


2003 Winnebago Brave 36M
2012 Scion xB


dadd45

northeast NEBR USA

Senior Member

Joined: 06/21/2004

View Profile



Posted: 09/23/10 01:42pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

mowermech wrote:

Wireless...
That means it communicates with itself through RF (Radio Frequency) waves.
What happens when I pull up beside you, talking on my 75 watt 2 meter radio, or my 100 watt 10 meter radio, or even my 4 watt CB radio? According to FCC rules, it must accept interference from other RF sources, while not broadcasting any interference. Is the shielding adequate?
What happens when somebody using an identical unit gets close to you and activates their brakes? Will yours know it isn't YOU?
There have been reports of people with wireless cameras picking up signals from other cameras. The frequencies these things are allowed to use are pretty limited.
Just something to think about...

yaknow, those are excellent questions (I think) and if I were interested in the Patriot system I would certainly pose them to Blue Ox and hope THEY had the answers before I purchased.....IMHO, of course


DadD45
2004 Cross Country Coachmen
2001 Wrangler behind
JUST HAVIN' FUN!!!

xctraveler

Livingston TX

Senior Member

Joined: 10/28/2002

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 09/23/10 01:47pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Another satisfied user of the US Gear Unified brake system. Over 50k miles on it and it just quietly does its thing. If I took the time to add the two wires to the 6 wire connector, I could eliminate the 2 seconds it takes to make the second connection. Oh yes I do have to snap on the breakaway cable too.


Paul
Trucking down the road in our 2012 Phaeton 36QSH on Freightliner Chassis with a Cummins 380 pushing it. 2011 Cherry Red Jeep Wrangler Rubicon with US Gear Unified Tow Brake System. Check out my blog
FMCA 352081 SKP# 99526


Dutch_12078

Great Sacandaga Lake, NY

Senior Member

Joined: 10/07/2008

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Online
Posted: 09/23/10 01:54pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Diplomat Don wrote:

The Ready Brake system is good, but it's always on when decelerating when there may be times you don't want it to apply, like when a DP is able to handle the braking via the exhaust brake. I've also asked the represenatives of Ready Brake...many times....how does the Ready Brake know when the vacumn boster is out of air. The first few stops will be boosted and the rest of them won't. Anyone who has stepped on a brake pedal with the engine off knows how much harder it is to depress the brake. How does the Raedy Brake adjust to the initial braking and then unassisted braking.

I think a perfect system could be designed for both DP's and gassers, but no one has done it yet.

We have not noticed any problems with our toad "riding the brakes" on downhill driving. The spring loaded pre-load seems to do a good job of holding the brakes off until the coach brakes are activated. I have seen a very brief blink of our dash mounted toad brake indicator on occasion when down shifting to retard the coach speed, but that's about it. NSA covers this in their "Frequently Asked Questions".

Since the ReadyBrake is a surge system, the toad brakes are only applied to the extent needed to hold the toad back from pushing against the coach more than necessary. I did do some testing of the difference between a live pedal and a dead pedal with my under braked F-53, and determined that the live pedal does have enough advantage to be helpful. It was a relatively simple matter to add NSA's optional vacuum pump to our RAV4 at a minimal cost, so now I always have a live pedal when towing.


Dutch
2001 GBM Landau 34' Class A
F53 chassis, Triton V10, TST TPMS
2011 Toyota RAV4 4WD/Remco pump
ReadyBrute Elite tow bar/Blue Ox baseplate


Marty&Pat

Cary, NC

Full Member

Joined: 01/14/2004

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 09/23/10 02:20pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Blue Ox Patriot system with remote dash unit. Works well for us and as already stated an easy installation.


2009 Winnebago Destination 39N
Freightliner Chassis
2004 Honda CRV TOAD

Mississippi

Starkville, MS, USA

Senior Member

Joined: 01/22/2001

View Profile





Offline
Posted: 09/23/10 02:21pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

M&G gets my vote.


S. Keith Winfield,CPA
Carol Winfield, copilot
Jolie Karra Tassos, resident English Bulldog
2008 Dutchstar DSDP 4304

mscamping

any place, USA

Senior Member

Joined: 10/27/2000

View Profile





Offline
Posted: 09/23/10 02:36pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Either of the SMI systems are very good.. We have the Stay-N-Play Duo.. We don't have air brakes, but if you do Air Force One by SMI will work.. No dead pedal operation, that was our hing up when choosing a system..
Mike M..


2003 Holiday Rambler Neptune 36 PBD - ISB 300 Cummins- Allison MH2000 5 speed
2013 Equinox w/Blue Ox Aventa II & SMI Stay-n-Play Duo
FMCA 331658 HRRVC 105155 Chapter - 57- Good Sam Life Member - Coach Net - 3/4 timers
Mike & Sharon

retiredvegasmetrocop

Celebration, FL (Mickey's town)

Senior Member

Joined: 02/18/2003

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 09/23/10 02:44pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Well, here we go again....I have no brake system on my Subaru toad. And am perfectly legal. I've read way too many stories about braking systems failing, locking up toad brakes, and causing severe wear to the toad service brakes. I can stop my motorhome and toad just fine with the motorhome brakes. That said, if it makes you feel safer, by all means install one. Just don't be scammed by the makers of these systems who want you to believe they are mandatory in all states. In fact most states do not have statutes written that require towed AUTOS to have a braking system. Many do have requirements on TRAILERS, but that doesn't apply to AUTOS.


Joe Greenwood
2007 Monaco Camelot 42PLQ
2004 Subaru Forester XT 5spd turbo AWD, toad for the Class A
2007 Chrysler Crossfire Special Edition roadster, Blaze red
2005 Honda Goldwing GL1800 w/Motor Trike conversion

This Topic Is Closed  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 5  
Prev  |  Next

Open Roads Forum  >  Dinghy Towing

 > Brake systems for toads--your recommendations
Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Dinghy Towing


New posts No new posts
Closed, new posts Closed, no new posts
Moved, new posts Moved, no new posts

Adjust text size:

© 2014 Good Sam Club | Terms & Conditions | PRIVACY POLICY | YOUR PRIVACY RIGHTS