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 > R-7 insulation value

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soren

Lancaster County PA

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Posted: 12/02/11 04:50am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

forrestrv wrote:

well this is a northwood product im refering too. Now an artic fox but a new line from northwood called a fox creek travel trailer line made in oregon... wow im a little dissapointed i fugured they would have made a more insulated unit for the pnw but then again this is a price point trailer i just figured it being from northwood and all it would still have great insulation i suppose i was wrong.
Supposedly, Northwood purchases the remains of Fleetwood's towable product line and is producing a product very similar Fleetwood's stuff, at the time of their demise. If this is accurate, comparing a Fleetwood "clone" to an Artic Fox is like saying a 500 series Mercedes sedan is just like a Chevy Colbalt, as they both have four wheels and doors.

JIMNLIN

Oklahoma

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Posted: 12/02/11 05:06am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

We wintered in a R7 insulated 27' 5er while the house was being built. Never again. Interior sweating was a huge problem till I bought two dehumidifiers.

The trailer was skirted with mobile home skirting. I cut 1/8" Lexan for the inside of all the windows and sealed them with 1/2" foam tape. Huge interior sweating issues in the closets.

If I lived in a hi humidity area, especially in the winter and was going to camp it wouldn't be with a R7 intry level RV unit. Did I mention interior sweating. JMO.


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soren

Lancaster County PA

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Posted: 12/02/11 05:09am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

spadoctor wrote:

Keep in mind the CLAIMS of R this and R that are made at the thickest center part of the roof and are not as high as claimed in MOST of the roof which is the most importaint place as it is the highest heat loss, followed by the windows.
100% correct. Manufacturer's use all kinds of voodoo to "create" R value. Crazy values attributed to bubble wrap. Wild claims of R-30 to R-38 values in floors that have aluminum floor joists and massive steel frames, creating huge amounts of thermal bridging. Aluminum framed walls where 15-20% of the wall is highly conductive aluminum, and the brochure states, "R-10 side walls". As a builder who has built everything from log homes to super-insulated structures, I gotta' say, some of these claims would make a used car salesman blush.

shum02

Burlington ON CDA

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Posted: 12/02/11 07:56am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

JIMNLIN wrote:

We wintered in a R7 insulated 27' 5er while the house was being built. Never again. Interior sweating was a huge problem till I bought two dehumidifiers.

The trailer was skirted with mobile home skirting. I cut 1/8" Lexan for the inside of all the windows and sealed them with 1/2" foam tape. Huge interior sweating issues in the closets.

If I lived in a hi humidity area, especially in the winter and was going to camp it wouldn't be with a R7 intry level RV unit. Did I mention interior sweating. JMO.


The insulating value of the rig has very little to do with sweating. The rig like a house needs to have the air exchanged for fresh dry air by venting, sorry but you can't close a rig up to keep it warm/cool and expect that you are not going to have moisture issues. Closet, cupboards etc need to be opened up every once in a while with fans to help move the air around to dry these areas up. Nature of the beast.


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JIMNLIN

Oklahoma

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Posted: 12/02/11 06:23pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

shum02 wrote:

JIMNLIN wrote:

We wintered in a R7 insulated 27' 5er while the house was being built. Never again. Interior sweating was a huge problem till I bought two dehumidifiers.

The trailer was skirted with mobile home skirting. I cut 1/8" Lexan for the inside of all the windows and sealed them with 1/2" foam tape. Huge interior sweating issues in the closets.

If I lived in a hi humidity area, especially in the winter and was going to camp it wouldn't be with a R7 intry level RV unit. Did I mention interior sweating. JMO.


The insulating value of the rig has very little to do with sweating. The rig like a house needs to have the air exchanged for fresh dry air by venting, sorry but you can't close a rig up to keep it warm/cool and expect that you are not going to have moisture issues. Closet, cupboards etc need to be opened up every once in a while with fans to help move the air around to dry these areas up. Nature of the beast.

Guess we have different experience(s). Tried opening vents/windows with fans moving lots of air around and all that did create more drafty cold and more humidity. Very uncomfortable when its 10 degrees. Thats when I made the Lexan window covers which helped bunches with cold and humidity however the only thing we found that got rid of the our humidity and sweating walls/closets was two dehumidifiers.
And, low insulated R7 wall are a huge contributer to interior condensation on the walls especially in closets. Our newer unit has higher insulated valus and little to none sweating especailly in the closets.

shum02

Burlington ON CDA

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Posted: 12/03/11 08:52am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Almost 4 seasons of winter camping under my belt with no condensation issues or high humidity. Getting the humid air out of the rig either through venting or in some cases a dehumidifier(only know one who tried and didn't think it worth it)is the trick and unless the outside air is as humid as the interior it's going to work. Humid air freezing on exterior walls behind doors and closed accesses is par for the course and eventually if cold enough this will happen to any wall regardless of how well it is insulated.

Cooking, showering and lots of people breathing in a small space create humid air, it has to be vented and exchanged. 4 people in my rig while cooking and -20C/-4F outside will get you a lot of humidity in a very short period of time but I've never had issue getting that air out of the rig and new drier air warmed up. Only takes a lot of energy to get it done and at -4F there is not much in the way of water in that air unless its snowing.

Guess the air up here is different.

mtofell1

Oregon

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Posted: 12/03/11 04:33pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

As some have elluded to there are other factors. The single vs double pane windows will likely make the most difference. I've camped different rigs in Oregon in both and single pane trailer got cold super quick in comparison.

As for electric heaters I agree with the oil filled radiant. They're basically silent and are very safe. I also keep a ceramic or red glowing radiant around for quick heat up in the morning. The oil filled do take a bit to get going.

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