Good Sam Club Open Roads Forum: Travel Trailers: towing with Toyota 4Runner
Open Roads Forum Already a member? Login here.   If not, Register Today!  |  Help

Newest  |  Active  |  Popular  |  RVing FAQ Forum Rules  |  Forum Posting Help and Support  |  Contact  

Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Travel Trailers

Open Roads Forum  >  Travel Trailers

 > towing with Toyota 4Runner

This Topic Is Closed  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 4  
Prev  |  Next
anaro

Mebane, NC

Senior Member

Joined: 01/16/2011

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member


Posted: 01/29/12 07:44am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

How big of a trailer are you hoping to tow? You could look at the armada, suburban or expedition if you want a bigger trailer or more stability. If towing something small you could look at a v8 durango. I'm worried you might be outmatched in a 4 runner unless you go really little.


2014 Silverado 3500 Duramax, SRW, Crew Cab, 4WD
2014 Palomino Sabre 34REQS -
2011 Crossroads Zinger ZT26BL - sold in 2014

colorado_jeff

Colorado

Full Member

Joined: 06/19/2007

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 01/30/12 12:08pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Lots of long stories but the bottom-line, with our 2003 4spd V6 automatic it just couldn't handle the 23 ft 3500 lb dry trailer. Tried it for 2 summers Fine locally at 40 mph. Highway speed just too much wind resistance. In a head wind going up hill it was even worse. Kept dropping to 2nd to go even 45 mph on the highway. Turned the AC off to help eventhough it was 90+ out. Mileage dropped to 7mpg one trip. With a 20 gallon tank that meant looking for a gas station every 90 or so min. Can be some long stretches out west without gas stations.

If you are buying new consider the v8 or the Sequoia or the jeep diesel (if they still sell it). Or a truck with a cap. We ended up with a Ram 2500 diesel before we did our summer long trip. Took away all the worries with towing so we could just have fun.

Bob Landry

Austin, texas

Senior Member

Joined: 12/11/2005

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 01/30/12 03:08pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I pulled a 22FB Jayco with a 4Runner V6. It really struggled. Two trips and it got traded for Tundra with a 4.6L. One trip across West Texas fighting a cross wind and that truck got traded on one with a 5.7L. It does great. The trailer has since been upgraded(Outback @#8000 and the truck rocks). As in many other venues, more is better, bigger is better. No one ever woke up one morning and said,"Man, I wish I had less truck".


2011 Keystone Outback 277RL

gilldawg79

Alabama

Full Member

Joined: 03/13/2006

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 01/31/12 07:59pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

We towed our Jayco 19BH with a 2005 Pathfinder V6 for 2 summers. It didn't do bad, but I wanted more and got a 2500HD gas burner. Now we are getting a bigger trailer. LOL!


Jimmy
West Central Alabama
2012 Jayco JayFlight 26RKS w/ side bunks
2006 GMC Ext Cab 2500HD 4X4/6.0/4.10
RTR!


Goo

SW Ontario

Full Member

Joined: 03/10/2010

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 01/31/12 08:20pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Here's my story: We bought a 3800# (dry) 26' trailer 3 years ago and the wife didn't want a full size truck so we bought the 4Runner with the 4.7 since the book said it could tow 7200#. Well, the towing experience was a little scary. We bought the ProPride hitch to counter the sway. Much better experience but it was working hard. We went to the scales on our way out for a week away and here's what I found:
Trailer loaded - 5050#
Front axle AT its rating
Rear axle 50# OVER its rating
Well, a bigger TV was not in the budget, so I figured as long as I take it easy it'll do for a couple years - and it did. The for sale sign goes on it this April.


08 Trail Cruiser TC26QBH
2012 F150 FX4 Screw MaxTow
03 4Runner Limited V8 (SOLD *sniff*)
Wife
2 Kids
Dog

Sbeach99

Concord, NC

New Member

Joined: 12/29/2011

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 01/31/12 08:30pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

The common thread is that the 4Runner is a great and reliable vehicle and CAN tow its stated load. However it does so in a way that doesn't leave much to the imagination if you know what I mean. Plus, 90% of TV decisions are made by men and we are always keen for more power under the hood... darn good excuse. Honey, it's a matter of safety!!! Yes, the LTZ package with chrome wheels is definitely safer than the LS. ;-)

On my first post about our TT/TV, someone said, "Welcome to the forum. Now be prepared for a lifetime of TV/TT upgrades." Bought a TT. Need a bigger TV (for safety). New TV has more capacity. Buys bigger TT. Needs bigger TT... and so on and so on.

If I could have kept my full loaded weight around 4500 and 19' I would have kept the 4Runner forever. I could have towed Jimmy's Jayco above just about anywhere.


Scott

Just your average family trying to unplug every now and then!

2012 Coachmen Catalina 21BH
2011 Chevy Tahoe 4x4 LTZ
EAZ-Lift WDH

CKNSLS

Northern Utah

Senior Member

Joined: 07/20/2006

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 01/31/12 11:01pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Sbeach99 wrote:

The common thread is that the 4Runner is a great and reliable vehicle and CAN tow its stated load. However it does so in a way that doesn't leave much to the imagination if you know what I mean. Plus, 90% of TV decisions are made by men and we are always keen for more power under the hood... darn good excuse. Honey, it's a matter of safety!!! Yes, the LTZ package with chrome wheels is definitely safer than the LS. ;-)

On my first post about our TT/TV, someone said, "Welcome to the forum. Now be prepared for a lifetime of TV/TT upgrades." Bought a TT. Need a bigger TV (for safety). New TV has more capacity. Buys bigger TT. Needs bigger TT... and so on and so on.

If I could have kept my full loaded weight around 4500 and 19' I would have kept the 4Runner forever. I could have towed Jimmy's Jayco above just about anywhere.


Agree with SB. I towed a 21 foot Shamrock 21 RS (Dry 4,000 pounds) and the 4Runner had the power w/the 4.7, but that 109.5" wheelbase is the limitation that doesn't make it a great tow vehicle. I towed with it only in the flatlands for 4 years and then traded it in on a 1500 Silverado Crew Cab.

APT

SE Michigan

Senior Member

Joined: 06/09/2010

View Profile



Posted: 02/01/12 05:40am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

You need to determine what kind of TT you want, size and weight. Then plan the TV purchase accordingly. There are so many people that come on here that just bought a brand new current model XYZ with 8000+ pounds tow rating only to find out they are limited to a TT under 5000 pounds loaded.

Buy the most capable (as in payload probably) tow vehicle you can afford and can live with in non towing situations, like if it is a daily driver. I'd save the 4 Runner for single axle (3500 pounds GVWR) TTs.


A & A parents of DD 2005, DS1 2007, DS2 2009
2011 Suburban 2500 6.0L 3.73 pulling 2011 Heartland North Trail 28BRS
2017 Subaru Outback 3.6R

tfodify

Winnipeg

New Member

Joined: 04/19/2010

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 02/01/12 06:32am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

APT wrote:

You need to determine what kind of TT you want, size and weight. Then plan the TV purchase accordingly. There are so many people that come on here that just bought a brand new current model XYZ with 8000+ pounds tow rating only to find out they are limited to a TT under 5000 pounds loaded.

Buy the most capable (as in payload probably) tow vehicle you can afford and can live with in non towing situations, like if it is a daily driver. I'd save the 4 Runner for single axle (3500 pounds GVWR) TTs.


Last summer we pulled our 29', 4700 lb dry trailer about 3000 miles with our V8 'runner, including through the Rockies twice (Rogers Pass). We don't have parking room for a big truck, and I did a ton of research before we bought either vehicle (I highly recommend this spreadsheet). I also have a Sherline tongue weight scale and we bought a ProPride hitch.

The 'runner is minimally loaded - two adults and one child and hardly any gear. Tongue weight is at around 10% when we tow with a full fresh tank. We're at 90% of GCVWR, and about 300 lbs shy of the truck GVWR with a full tank of gas.

I don't recommend this setup to everyone. I strongly suspect you need the ProPride (or a Hensley) to be stable with just 10% tongue weight. And it's definitely sensitive to having the weight distribution set up properly, and that took me a bit of trial and error. But once it's dialed in, it's pretty sweet. I don't really notice anything passing (or being passed by) trucks on the highway. I've driven it on a winding, two lane road with a 50 mph speed limit and slower curves, and it's like it's on rails.

You're going to feel strong crosswinds, but the ProPride really does take the sway out of the equation. We hit some really nasty winds on the prairies last year, crossing a storm front that dropped a foot (yes, a foot) of hail in some areas (none on our path, thankfully). My wife was driving - she slowed down to 50 mph but didn't find the experience particularly stressful. You feel the whole tow vehicle move side to side as you would when not towing, only somewhat more pronounced.

Sure, it would be nice to have more torque - we definitely slow down on the big hills. In my perfect world the 'runner would have a diesel (and maybe a bit more payload). The ProPride fixes the wheelbase issue (as would a Hensley).

I would not attempt this without the ProPride (or a Hensley), and maybe not with a different trailer (ours is a Crossroads Slingshot 29BH). The trailer's configuration helps - it would be easy to get too much tongue weight if it were built differently, as the hitch adds close to 200 lbs. And the truck has the load leveling air bags which I'm sure is also a useful thing.

Bottom line: yes, you can tow a long trailer with a V8 'runner, if it's the right (light) trailer, if you have the right hitch, if it's loaded right, if you have a low enough load in the truck. If, if, if.

I think it's worth noting that with a 7000 lb towing capacity, a 4700 lb dry trailer could pretty easily be too much for the 'runner. I had lots of salesmen assure me that their heavier trailers with more tongue weight would be no problem for a regular towing configuration.

I'm happy with our decision.

And that spreadsheet is an absolute gem. My thanks to Pop-the-top!

Sbeach99

Concord, NC

New Member

Joined: 12/29/2011

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 02/01/12 07:00am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

tfodify wrote:

APT wrote:

You need to determine what kind of TT you want, size and weight. Then plan the TV purchase accordingly. There are so many people that come on here that just bought a brand new current model XYZ with 8000+ pounds tow rating only to find out they are limited to a TT under 5000 pounds loaded.

Buy the most capable (as in payload probably) tow vehicle you can afford and can live with in non towing situations, like if it is a daily driver. I'd save the 4 Runner for single axle (3500 pounds GVWR) TTs.


Last summer we pulled our 29', 4700 lb dry trailer about 3000 miles with our V8 'runner, including through the Rockies twice (Rogers Pass). We don't have parking room for a big truck, and I did a ton of research before we bought either vehicle (I highly recommend this spreadsheet). I also have a Sherline tongue weight scale and we bought a ProPride hitch.

The 'runner is minimally loaded - two adults and one child and hardly any gear. Tongue weight is at around 10% when we tow with a full fresh tank. We're at 90% of GCVWR, and about 300 lbs shy of the truck GVWR with a full tank of gas.

I don't recommend this setup to everyone. I strongly suspect you need the ProPride (or a Hensley) to be stable with just 10% tongue weight. And it's definitely sensitive to having the weight distribution set up properly, and that took me a bit of trial and error. But once it's dialed in, it's pretty sweet. I don't really notice anything passing (or being passed by) trucks on the highway. I've driven it on a winding, two lane road with a 50 mph speed limit and slower curves, and it's like it's on rails.

You're going to feel strong crosswinds, but the ProPride really does take the sway out of the equation. We hit some really nasty winds on the prairies last year, crossing a storm front that dropped a foot (yes, a foot) of hail in some areas (none on our path, thankfully). My wife was driving - she slowed down to 50 mph but didn't find the experience particularly stressful. You feel the whole tow vehicle move side to side as you would when not towing, only somewhat more pronounced.

Sure, it would be nice to have more torque - we definitely slow down on the big hills. In my perfect world the 'runner would have a diesel (and maybe a bit more payload). The ProPride fixes the wheelbase issue (as would a Hensley).

I would not attempt this without the ProPride (or a Hensley), and maybe not with a different trailer (ours is a Crossroads Slingshot 29BH). The trailer's configuration helps - it would be easy to get too much tongue weight if it were built differently, as the hitch adds close to 200 lbs. And the truck has the load leveling air bags which I'm sure is also a useful thing.

Bottom line: yes, you can tow a long trailer with a V8 'runner, if it's the right (light) trailer, if you have the right hitch, if it's loaded right, if you have a low enough load in the truck. If, if, if.

I think it's worth noting that with a 7000 lb towing capacity, a 4700 lb dry trailer could pretty easily be too much for the 'runner. I had lots of salesmen assure me that their heavier trailers with more tongue weight would be no problem for a regular towing configuration.

I'm happy with our decision.

And that spreadsheet is an absolute gem. My thanks to Pop-the-top!


Similarly, my EAZ-lift hitch towed my 21QBH dead straight as an arrow. Mind you she is a dual-axle and 24'9" total length. Can't imagine 29+. There is a big difference between the v6 and v8 obviously and Toyota certainly put more thought into the V8 as a TV. I do miss getting 21 MPG from my TV when doing more normal non-towing driving; the Tahoe tops out around 17.5 mpg on the highway (despite what the sticker claims).

This Topic Is Closed  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 4  
Prev  |  Next

Open Roads Forum  >  Travel Trailers

 > towing with Toyota 4Runner
Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Travel Trailers


New posts No new posts
Closed, new posts Closed, no new posts
Moved, new posts Moved, no new posts

Adjust text size:

© 2019 CWI, Inc. © 2019 Good Sam Enterprises, LLC. All Rights Reserved. | Terms of Use | PRIVACY POLICY | YOUR PRIVACY RIGHTS