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RE: Dry as a bone,…again

Folks, My recently acquired Holiday Rambler, Augusta, B+, 29’ has a fresh water issue. When dry camping I can only get about two days from the single 29 gallon fresh water holding tank. It’s only the two of us and we don’t shower in the RV. There is no leak. Our previous rig, a 34’ Itasca Suncruiser, had two large water tanks. Never an issue. Your new RV does not have a fresh water issue; YOU have a water usage issue. Your previous 34' class A rig likely had at least 3 or even 4 times the water capacity that your new rig has (my 30' Itasca Sunrise has 84 gal). It is easy to get lazy with water conservation when you have that much on "tap". My last rig (a class C) had 32 gal, and we (DW & I) could go 3-4 days IF we only "navy" showered on the last day, but we were also very cognizant of conserving in everything we did. Sorry, but going from a large class A to a mid-sized B+, you've got to change how you use water.
4x4van 06/09/21 04:54pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Metal carport RV shelter

You know the how it is with boats and "2foot-itis". My advice is to make the building as large as your property can accommodate, within reason of coarse. Build it bigger than your rig needs because life changes. Suddenly it's too small and you'll be kicking yourself over your decision to make it just big enough. Maybe you'll never own a larger motor home, but later want to store other things inside, if not for yourself, then for family & friends. /\ This /\ You'll never say "Wish I had gone smaller", but you might say "Wish I had gone bigger".
4x4van 05/10/21 10:15am Class C Motorhomes
RE: Would you switch from Class A to Travel Trailer

Some of these "A is better than TT" arguments are getting pretty weak. I have a class C and a folding trailer and these are my thoughts: 1. If you already have a tow vehicle OR a toad, go that way. The money you save by not having to buy the other will get you more trips. 2. Being able to use the restroom while stopped in road construction is priceless. If you buy a TT make sure you have easy access. 3. If the trip allows, you can take the A without a toad, but you can't take the trailer without the tow vehicle. 4. Having the other person willing/able to drive the combination can be a lifesaver. If they refuse to drive one, go with the other. 5. If you like to stop for lunch, neither combo is inconvenient. If you like to eat and drive, then the A is more convenient. 6. The A will be more difficult to find a shop for engine work than a tow vehicle will be due to size. 7. If the A engine fails, you lose your home but still have a car to get around. If the tow vehicle engine fails, you still have your home but no way to get around. 8. If the A house portion or the trailer fails, you lose your home but still have a vehicle to get around.Good wrap up.
4x4van 05/10/21 09:59am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Is the year of the coach based on the year of the chassis

"A 2G alternator's biggest issue: an under-capacity rectifier and power connector (A). The connection and large, hollow case cavity were corrosion-prone, which increased resistance, causing voltage drops and heat build-up. Result: early unit failure, and even electrical fires" https://www.hotrod.com/articles/install-high-output-ford-3g-alternator-older-fords/ According to that, the 3G came out in the 94s, not the 92s like I said. So that means you could not spot a 92 by its headlight shape, etc and know it has a 3G. If the 94 C has a 93 chassis with a 2G, that would be a problem for me, but it is all history now. I do imagine the same sort of thing can be happening with more recent model years.Interesting article, but I do see that it is pretty simple to change out the 1G/2G alternator with a 3G, so the idea that the alternator would be the deciding factor in whether or not to purchase a particular RV is unlikely, at least from my perspective, although yours may be different. I also see nothing in the article (other than the one picture caption) mentioning fires. If it was common or "infamous", as you suggest, I'd expect the article itself would mention it in the text.
4x4van 05/05/21 09:13am Class C Motorhomes
RE: Would you switch from Class A to Travel Trailer

And then there is common sense. There isn't an intelligent person alive that would let their loved ones ride in a camper being pulled down the road. Lets face it, in any type of accident a pull type camp will not win - period. They're just not built that well. That's not a knock on them, it's just a realistic statement - they're simply not built for it. It's bad enough in a MH, but at least you have a decent frame around you. With a pull camper, of any type, what could possibly go wrong. :E https://pickuptrucktalk.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/trailer-wreck-photo-1.jpg Agreed. But then I don't recall this thread discussing riding in a trailer...:? It sure seemed like it. No way are you going to be driving the Volvo and getting up to stretch your legs, make a sandwich, use the bathroom, etc - unless you're riding in the camper. :wPretty sure that that was my point; can't be done with a trailer (nor has anyone claimed it can/should), while it CAN be done in a class A/C.
4x4van 05/05/21 09:02am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Would you switch from Class A to Travel Trailer

And then there is common sense. There isn't an intelligent person alive that would let their loved ones ride in a camper being pulled down the road. Lets face it, in any type of accident a pull type camp will not win - period. They're just not built that well. That's not a knock on them, it's just a realistic statement - they're simply not built for it. It's bad enough in a MH, but at least you have a decent frame around you. With a pull camper, of any type, what could possibly go wrong. :E https://pickuptrucktalk.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/trailer-wreck-photo-1.jpg Agreed. But then I don't recall this thread discussing riding in a trailer...:?
4x4van 05/04/21 04:21pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: Is the year of the coach based on the year of the chassis

" I would suggest no one would actually consider a lesser alternator as "waste of time" on a used RV, as you suggest.." The 1991 Fords and earlier had a bad type of alternator that was infamous for catching fire for some unlucky owners. It also has low amps, which hinders "alternator charging" of the House batteries. The 92s got a newer, better, higher amp alternator, so it is important in that case. (This was all discussed a while ago on Tech Issues with Mex supplying the gory details on the 91's alternator fires.) My 91 has that alternator, but it is doing ok so far. Fingers crossed. Doesn't matter now of course, but I thought it might be the same thing with new "generation" changes that matter. AFAIK there are some recent changes to alternator regulation that also affect House charging, so people are getting DC-DC chargers. I don't know what chassis years are involved, but it could matter to some buyers perhaps.Hmmmm, this is the first I've heard of alternator fires being common or infamous. Neither of mine had issues ('79 & '88...oops; '87 :)), and replacing an alternator with a better unit would likely be relatively inexpensive. So I'm not saying that an alternator is not relevant, just that it wouldn't be a "waste of time".
4x4van 05/04/21 03:32pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Awning replacement fabric adventure...oy

Anyone know where to purchase the metal guard/wrap? My last RV had the metal guard and after 12 years the material was still in perfect shape. My current one (without the metal guard) is already showing signs of wear after just a few years.
4x4van 05/03/21 04:19pm Tech Issues
RE: Hooray for Shark Bite fittings...

My Itasca uses Flair-it fittings on the PEX lines. They are fairly inexpensive, easy to use (no tools required), and quite effective. I carry a couple of straight couplers, a couple of elbows, a couple of T's, and a couple of end caps; although I have yet to actually need any of them. The few leaks I've had required nothing more than a hand tightening. My most used fitting for emergency repairs is the in-line valve. It can be used as a connector, an end cap, and of course as a valve.Excellent point about the valve being "multi-functional"; I think I'll add a couple of Flair-It valves to my spare set.
4x4van 05/03/21 04:07pm General RVing Issues
RE: Is the year of the coach based on the year of the chassis

There's nothing misleading about it. I understand your reasoning, but this is not the world of cars/trucks; You are not buying/selling/registering a bare chassis, you are buying/selling/registering a complete RV, and while a major chassis change may very well make a difference, I would suggest no one would actually consider a lesser alternator as "waste of time" on a used RV, as you suggest. The manufacturer's brochure will normally list the basic drivetrain mechanicals that apply to the first units built in that model year, and then there may in fact be upgrades midyear (when the newer chassis begin their trip down the coach assembly line). So you are actually more likely to get better than the brochure lists, but never worse in the case of split year RVs. Doubtful that you would complain about those improvements/upgrades, right? I live in CA. My last coach was a 1988 Jamboree, built in 1987 on a 1987 Ford Chassis, and that chassis was actually built in late 1986. So was it a 1986, 1987, or 1988? It was correctly registered as a 1988. CA does in fact, follow the Federal guidelines (I'm sure that exceptions occur, but they are the exception, not the rule). The only hassle is that when purchasing chassis or tune-up parts, you will need to purchase for an earlier model year, particularly if there were changes. I had to remember to buy for a 1987 rather than 1988, as there were significant changes at that time (Carb vs FI, for example). That was indeed a big change, but I bought the rig knowing it was carb. Keep in mind, if the chassis and coach had to match, there wouldn't be any current model year coaches even available until mid-year:(. You want to purchase a new 2021 RV? You would need to wait till June of 2021.
4x4van 05/03/21 03:14pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Would you switch from Class A to Travel Trailer

Traveling long distance in a Class A is much nicer than traveling long distance in a TV/TT. Your DW can get up, stretch her legs, go to the restroom, grab a snack/drink...even lay down and catch a few Z's. None of that can be done in a TV while driving down the road. I'm going to disagree with part of that, it depends on what TV you have. A friend has a converted Volvo tractor that he pulls a big 5'er with. I've been on a few trips with him in, it's dream to drive, far nicer IMHO than my Class A in that it is far more 'surefooted' on the highway. There is no hint of the 'tail wagging the dog' from crosswinds or the bow wave of other vehicles. While the Volvo may very well be "a dream" to drive, it still doesn't allow everything else in the section of my comment that you quoted; DW can't get up, stretch her legs, go to the restroom, grab a snack/drink...even lay down and catch a few Z's. It's also a very rare towing combination. I know it’s commonly done, but still, neither the Volvo NOR the law allow any of those things either.While that is true in Canada, It's not necessarily the case here in the US. In fact, more than half of the states in the US currently require only the driver and front seat passenger, along with kids/minors, to be seat-belted in an RV. https://camperreport.com/wearing-seatbelts-in-motorhomes-the-laws-for-all-50-states/ https://www.cruiseamerica.com/rv-adventures/rv-lifestyle/rv-seat-belt-laws-in-every-us-state-canada
4x4van 05/03/21 01:59pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: What's under the coroplast?

Thanks guys. Hopefully I'll get a chance to pull it off soon. You've given me a bit more confidence of what I'm apt to find (both the good and the bad!).
4x4van 05/03/21 01:04pm Travel Trailers
What's under the coroplast?

My daughter and SIL have a 2020 Forest River Heritage Glen TT, and there are 2 issues that I need to address. Unfortunately, both will require dropping the coroplast on the bottom of the trailer. Anyone know what's underneath (above) the coroplast? To clarify, ALL 3 of the tanks (2 grey, 1 black) drain ridiculously slow, as if the valve is only open half way, but since there are 3 different valves, the likelihood of it being a valve issue is remote. I'd like to actually see the plumbing configuration. Second issue is the freshwater "siphon" problem. First couple of trips were fine, but the last time, driving down the road, I noticed (while following) water pouring out of the bottom right side of the trailer. Upon stopping and looking, it was flowing out of what I "think" is either the overflow or a vent on the right side of the trailer. They had lost fully 1/2 tank of their fresh water! I plugged the line, and we continued. Shortly after, it started doing it again, this time from a line out of the bottom left side. THAT line has another line joining it thru a T before the open end. Neither of them are the low-point drains, which are found elsewhere (and marked as such). Also, this was not simply a matter of the water "sloshing" against the sides; it continued flowing full force even after stopping. Since any "siphon" action needs the beginning of the line actually in the water, then the vent/overflow lines must be either not installed at the top of the tank, or the lines extend down into the tank. Either way is not acceptable, and I refuse to go along with the idea that we must put a valve (or cap) on the lines in order to travel with fresh water. And sadly, Forest River flat out refuses to provide me with any plumbing schematics/diagrams, either for fresh or waste water systems; they claim it's a "liability issue"...BS!!!!!! Again, pulling the coroplast will hopefully give me some access to see just what's going on, but I'd hate to pull it and find the entire underside filled with spray foam or something, especially since there is indeed some spray foam around several locations where lines/wiring come through the coroplast. Any one pull this stuff down?
4x4van 04/30/21 05:11pm Travel Trailers
RE: Towing

Although I am one of those who believes that a secondary or auxiliary braking system is important and effective ,I still have a problem finding any legitimate statutes that specifically address the legal requirements for doing so! There are all kinds of statements published by the various companies selling auxiliary braking units indicating regulations in this jurisdiction or the other but no government issued requirements can be found probably because Towing equipment is not specifically covered under legislation. If someone can provide such documentation provided by the department of transport I would be interested in reading it! As stated I use a proportionate braking device which works very well with the air braking system in my Diesel Pusher and my Honda CRV !Maybe I'm not understanding what you're asking about, but every state in the US has laws specifically applying to trailers and the requirements for brakes on them (depending on weight). Are you saying that Canada doesn't?
4x4van 04/29/21 04:19pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: Would you switch from Class A to Travel Trailer

Traveling long distance in a Class A is much nicer than traveling long distance in a TV/TT. Your DW can get up, stretch her legs, go to the restroom, grab a snack/drink...even lay down and catch a few Z's. None of that can be done in a TV while driving down the road. I'm going to disagree with part of that, it depends on what TV you have. A friend has a converted Volvo tractor that he pulls a big 5'er with. I've been on a few trips with him in, it's dream to drive, far nicer IMHO than my Class A in that it is far more 'surefooted' on the highway. There is no hint of the 'tail wagging the dog' from crosswinds or the bow wave of other vehicles. While the Volvo may very well be "a dream" to drive, it still doesn't allow everything else in the section of my comment that you quoted; DW can't get up, stretch her legs, go to the restroom, grab a snack/drink...even lay down and catch a few Z's. It's also a very rare towing combination.
4x4van 04/26/21 09:37am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Stupid question about tires

Everything you never wanted to know about using Nitrogen in tires.
4x4van 04/22/21 02:19pm General RVing Issues
RE: Trailering

I'm really not sure why anyone else's fuel tank size is of such interest to Tom. He says he really can't see any reason to do a "55 gallon tank". Seriously? And I can't really see any reason to have a smaller tank. What makes anyone else's fueling preferences "odd" to him? My last RV had a 40 gallon tank; I hated it since my typical trip was about 350 miles, and at 7mpg, I had to make an additional stop for fuel on the way home. My current rig has a 75 gallon tank; I can now make that same trip without having to stop for fuel on the way home. It also guarantees that I have plenty of fuel for the generator if needed, both at the campsite and on the way home (for AC use).
4x4van 04/22/21 12:06pm Travel Trailers
RE: Would you switch from Class A to Travel Trailer

Traveling long distance in a Class A is much nicer than traveling long distance in a TV/TT. Your DW can get up, stretch her legs, go to the restroom, grab a snack/drink...even lay down and catch a few Z's. None of that can be done in a TV while driving down the road. The view from the huge front window while traveling (and when camped) is another major plus. And when you do stop (for the day or even for a short break), the A is already at living temperature inside, whereas the TT won't be. Someone here claimed that the driving area in a class A isn't "living" space...or that a 30' class A is equivalent to a 25' TT. I would disagree 100%. The front chairs swivel around and become part of the living area in a class A; in fact, that is my favorite seating location when camped. You only lose about 2' due to the dash; certainly less than the tongue of a TT.
4x4van 04/22/21 11:14am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Toon-Brite clear coat

I have used Both Red Max Pro and ZEP wet look on my Rig. Neither have yellowed . I also used the same products on a boat .they worked wonderfully on the Hull sides but peeled off on the BowDeck.I attributed that to the extremely bright Sunshine we were getting In the weeks following the application. Years ago I used Poly Glow on another rig which worked about the same.Interesting. I used the Red Max Pro on my last rig (in fact, I wrote a pretty detailed how-to on it that many have referred to). Mine definitely yellowed, although it wasn't too noticeable since my rig was tan. Ended up peeling/flaking on the sides that were exposed to the sun. Lots of bright sun/heat here in SoCal.
4x4van 04/19/21 03:43pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: Class C that's easy to fix?

Well, I guess I should have expected it, this being the class C forum and all, but I sometimes wonder if those who claim how much easier class C's are to work on than class A's have actually ever tried it on both? I've owned 2 class C's, both on E350 chassis, and they were both a nightmare to work on. The doghouse only exposes the rear 1/2 of the engine, the small hood only exposes the top front 1/4. The remaining 1/4 is blocked, top and sides, by the firewall, too far forward to reach from the back and too far back to reach from the front. Have fun getting the mid-point spark plugs on either side (one of my Cs actually had a section of the shock tower cut out with an acetylene torch by a previous owner to facilitate access to that plug). The other problem that the van cabs have (that trucks don't) is the fact that the floor is surrounding the rear of the engine, at the mid-engine level. Try replacing a broken exhaust manifold stud (a common occurrence) with barely 4" of clearance between that manifold and the gas pedal. Perhaps the newer Fords are better, but there is still the matter of the floor level being at about mid-engine level and the passenger compartment area for "feet" being next to the engine rather than above (like a class A) or behind (like a truck). That does not lend itself to easy engine access. Working on MY class A (Workhorse chassis) on the other hand, is like stretching out in a large open air garage. The easily removed doghouse (one quarter-turn allen bolt) exposes the entire top of the engine from just behind the radiator to the trans, and both sides are fully accessible from the large wheel wells without even removing a tire; all sparkplugs and coils are easily visible and accessible, as are all of the exhaust manifold studs. The entire floor is above the engine, not at the mid-engine level. Oil change? I can literally sit nearly upright underneath with full access to the drain plug and filter, as there is no other "stuff" closely surrounding the engine/trans and the floor is higher than the C. Belts and hoses are a bit of a pain, but certainly not much worse than my class Cs. Obviously, some class A's may be worse, but all class C's have tight working space around the drivetrain. The same blanket statement cannot be made about class A's.
4x4van 04/12/21 06:35pm Class C Motorhomes
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