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 > Your search for posts made by 'Bordercollie' found 34 matches.

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RE: New to me 1979 Dodge Fireball

Look for a related year model Dodge Van maintenance and repair manual, maybe "Chilton's". Owner's manuals are hard to find and were not usually detailed enough/generic. My 72 Dodge B300 engine required a lot fiddling with carbs, automatic choke and ignition system. Make sure you have a good coil.
Bordercollie 10/15/20 05:08pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Brougham Dodge 1979 engine

I would be skeptical about the bad fuel pump. Rig may not be able to run, you can't road test it. An old $13K "bargain" rig cost us some 12K more in repairs to get it usable long ago before we knew what we were doing. Replacing roof AC units, water heaters, fridges, RV generators, converter chargers, fresh water pumps, and house batteries plus 6 correct type quality tires and brakes, awning and suspension can raise the cost of a "cheap" old tired shabby rig to where it exceeds cost of a much newer and overall better, safer, fully usable rig. You may not be able to buy discontinued 8.00 X 16.5 tires and need to replace wheels and use new radial tires. Water damage is very costly to have fixed.
Bordercollie 10/15/20 04:32pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Should I buy a Class C or not for this specific situation?

Our 2004 Class C, bought new, required replacement of roof AC unit, fridge, converter/charger, fresh water pump and RV generator fuel system work at around 10 years old. Tires usually need to be replaced every 5-6 years when they become unsafe. House batteries last about 4 years properly maintained. Figure in cost of storage if you can't park on your property. There is also cost of insurance, annual DMV costs, periodic smog testing, and financing charges if you can't pay cash, and cost of fuel, propane, RV camp fees, and incidentals. Buying, owning and maintaining and using motorhome is expensive. Many of us only drive our motorhomes some 5000 miles per year camping and touring, etc., the rig sits unused most of the time. Will you and your wife continue to enjoy using the rig. Kids get older and lose interest in family fun. All factors to be considered when deciding to get into RV'ing along with basic type (class) year, model, size, floor plan, and features. Motorhome rental costs may seem ridiculous but may be a lot cheaper than owning.
Bordercollie 10/12/20 04:58am Class C Motorhomes
RE: Thinking about buying a class c

Your post mentions that you don't want to spend much and you don't want a "big one" It sounds as if you may be only "luke warm" about buying, maintaining and using an RV. In my opinion, a 26-27 foot bumper to bumper Class C is probably the best choice for most couples/families. This size is probably the most common and most available in used Class C's. That size usually has an RV queen size bed in a rear bedroom, a dinette that can make into a kid's or guest bed as well as an overhead bed over the cab area. There is a galley with cook top, oven, microwave, sink and fridge and some pantry storage and a fair amount of cabinetry. A "north-south queen bed with access on both sides is most convenient when one wants to get out of bed or make the bed. The bathrooms have a shower, a sink, a medicine cabinet, storage, and toilet. There is a fairly ample storage/cargo area in the rear. It's good to have a spare tire mounted securely in the rear. Some forest camp sites do not accomodate rigs longer than 27 feet. There is usually a water heater, an RV generator and roof air conditioning unit and some TV provision.
Bordercollie 10/08/20 09:52pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Thinking about buying a class c

We had to replace the fridge, roof AC unit, awning fabric, converter charger and have major fuel system work on the RV generator in our 2004 Class C at around the 10 year point. If you buy a 10 year old rig, expect some major repairs or replacements and factor that in with cost of insurance, registration, smog testing, tire and house battery replacements every 4-5 years. Owning any motorhome is a luxury. I've always thought that it might be more cost-effective to buy a 3 year old rig than a 10 year old one and either might be more cost effective than financing a new rig.
Bordercollie 10/07/20 10:09pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Is CG info available from MFG's

I build RC model planes and getting the model to balance properly at the designed CG point (slightly nose-down) is essential to flyability. Class C's with a lot of rear overhang, when loaded up in the rear, may have excess weight on the rear tires and not enough on the front tires for stable steering. I would think that a short Class C, with modest rear overhang might have better weight distribution and stability in steering.
Bordercollie 10/07/20 09:29pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: 24 ft ClassC MH downsides

We had a 23 foot class C and before that a Dodge van conversion. I grew to hate having cardboard boxes in the aisle etc. and having to convert couches into beds and and back again. There was little space for storage and clutter became depressing on long trips or extended camping. Going from a 32 foot to a 24 foot RV will be a big change. Probably some small Class C motorhomes do much better on storage than what you describe. For example, our 24 foot Class C has: - The entire area under both dinette seats available for storage. - Large partitioned-off separate areas at the foot and head of the overhead cab bed available for storage that run the full width of the bed. - Overhead cabinets above the lounge chair, above the dinette area, and above the kitchen double sink area. - Two closets for storage of clothing. - Drawers and cabinets under the kitchen areas, under and over the bathroom sink, under the refrigerator, and under one of the closets. - Overhead cabinets above and around the corner of the rear corner bed area. - Seven outside storage bays, with two of them extending under the floor laterally across the width of the coach for storage of long items. - Two storage areas under each cab seat. We don't have to transport anything on the roof, on either bumper, or strapped to the roof-access ladder. The only thing "under foot" when we travel is the enclosed crate, seat-belted in a dinette seat, for the dog so that she can travel somewhat restrained and safe. ;) Wow, there have been some real storage improvements in short rigs.
Bordercollie 09/18/20 08:42pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Looking for a good RV

It is nice to have the "best" or as good as you can afford or feel comfortable in spending the money for. It's difficult to know which brands/models to stay away from but most brands are of reasonably good materials and workmanship to be able to sell. I suspect that some manufacturers hire unskilled labor, use spot checks of assembly quality, and do not functionally test appliances and devices for proper operation before delivery to dealers. Dealer service departments are often backlogged negotiating with manufacturers for repair costs and correcting new rig defects.
Bordercollie 09/18/20 03:06pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: 2002 E.450 c.class starting issues

If seafoam doesn't help, find a reputable Ford truck mechanic with diagnostic tools to troubleshoot it and fix it.
Bordercollie 09/18/20 02:39pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Vintage RV upgrades

Sanitation of campsites. There are alternatives to dumping dishwater and shower water in and around campsites. There are plastic holding tanks for excess "gray water" and "black" (sewage) water that you can dump at a camp dump site. If you ever notice a strange smell at your newly rented campsite, it may be that the previous users dumped gray water, "bummer". If needed you can pull your rig over to the dump site half way through your stay and dump black and gray water tanks. Try to leave campsites cleaner than you found them including pet leavings.
Bordercollie 09/17/20 09:22pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Vintage RV upgrades

Another basic info item, the converter/charger does not charge the engine starting battery on most rigs. This means that when you park the rig for a month in your driveway, the starting battery self-discharges. A brand new starting battery may start the engine after a month or more but an older one may not be able to turn the engine over. Batteries that are kept fully charged keep their capacity longer than ones that are run down, left discharged, and later recharged. Frequent checks of electrolyte levels, adding distilled water as needed to cover the plates and timely recharging of batteries is a necessity with RV's. You can use a 12 volt "smart" trickle charger to keep your starting battery up if you have 110vac available. I have an add-on Trik-L-Start device installed which keeps my starting battery up while parked for months. It is connected to the house batteries and shares charging current with them . Make sure that battery connections are kept clean of corrosion and are making good contact.
Bordercollie 09/17/20 09:14pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Vintage RV upgrades

Another basic info item, the converter/charger does not charge the engine starting battery on most rigs. This means that when you park the rig for a month in your driveway, the starting battery self-discharges. A brand new starting battery may start the engine after a month or more but an older one may not be able to turn the engine over. Batteries that are kept fully charged keep their capacity longer than ones that are run down, left discharged, and later recharged. Frequent checks of electrolyte levels, adding distilled water as needed to cover the plates and timely recharging of batteries is a necessity with RV's. You can use a 12 volt "smart" trickle charger to keep your starting battery up if you have 110vac available. I have an add-on Trik-L-Start device installed which keeps my starting battery up while parked for months. It is connected to the house batteries and shares charging current with them . Make sure that battery connections are kept clean of corrosion and are making good contact.
Bordercollie 09/17/20 09:13pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Vintage RV upgrades

If you don't already know this, TYPICAL Class C electrical power is fed into the RV's "housebox" electrical system via cable plugged into 120vac camp power which feeds a "converter/charger"device which charges one or two deep cycle "house batteries" which in turn power the 12 volt DC interior lights and 12 volt appliance controls, the fresh water pump and the furnace blower. When the RV generator is running, it takes the place of the camp cable 110 vac hookup supplying 110vac power to the electrical system. When the RV's engine is running, it's alternator charges the house batteries while underway. Most RV water heaters and refrigerators run on propane. Refrigerators and microwave ovens also run on 110 vac when RV is on camp power or RV generator power. Furnace blowers draw considerable 12 volt house battery current and may run house batteries down in one night's use. Otherwise, house battery power may run interior lights for two to three nights if in good condition. Two day camping and a few hundred miles driving usually keeps house batteries charged and interior lights working.
Bordercollie 09/16/20 02:56pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: 24 ft ClassC MH downsides

We had a 23 foot class C and before that a Dodge van conversion. I grew to hate having cardboard boxes in the aisle etc. and having to convert couches into beds and and back again. There was little space for storage and clutter became depressing on long trips or extended camping. Going from a 32 foot to a 24 foot RV will be a big change.
Bordercollie 09/15/20 08:57pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Class C Pros and Cons

If you have had a TT you probably have a truck to pull a TT. RV'ers average some 5000 miles per year so a motorhome spends most of it's life parked in a drive way or in a storage yard, same for a TT but your truck can be used for transportation and other uses. A Class C without a towed trailer or car is more maneuverable. We use our Class C for going to local events like airshows and day trips to local parks with our dogs. A class B , like a Road Trek can be used by a couple for camping and touring as well as for commuting. Class A's are similar to Class C's but may have less sleeping space for the same length. Class A's are popular with older couples having somewhat smoother ride. A lot depends on how you often and how you are going to use an RV and just plain what appeals to you.
Bordercollie 09/15/20 08:38pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Carrying a Motorcycle with my 2000 Shasta Sprite?

Spend some time googling and reading about available rear and front motorcycle carrying options. I have carried my 188 lb Honda Trail 90 on a rear aluminum hitch rack safely with ratchet straps and bungee cords. This arrangement blocks access to rear cargo door, however. The weight of a motorcycle may shift the balance of your rig adding weight to the rear and making the front end light on it's front wheels. It may be that a small trailer is best and also useful for carrying other gear that won't fit well inside your short rig.
Bordercollie 09/15/20 08:26pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Vintage RV upgrades

Have radiator and transmission cooling radiator tested and change out water pump as preventive maintenance. Have dash AC system tested/serviced including belt and idler pulley. Replace front brake flex lines, a pain if they rupture internally, can cause loss of control. Have entire brake system serviced. Make sure tires are of proper type and less than 3 years old, not old stock. RV tires are safety critical items that need to be changed out when 5 or 6 years old regardless of mileage. Make sure that RV generator, roof AC system, convertor charger, and house batteries are good and able to work together properly to power the RV when not connected to camp power. Make sure propane system is working properly to power fridge, water heater and stove. Verify that fresh water pump , water pump switches, and plumbing are in good shape. Make sure interior and exterior lighting system work properly including turn signals, clearance lights, headlights and running lights. Verify that awning deploys and retracts properly and that fabric is in good condition. Make sure water heater and fridge are working properly. Drain water heater and clean out sediment. Verify that holding tanks and their dump valves are not leaking and toilet is flushing properly. There's more, but these are basics for safety and comfort.
Bordercollie 09/15/20 08:10pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Advice needed -90s Tioga

You should be able to find a much newer Class C in better condition for 12K. We bought an old rig for 13K as beginners and wound up spending another 10K the first year on engine cooling system, AC, water heater, etc., etc, just to make it safe to drive and usable for camping/touring. Read advice on buying a used Class C on this forum and don't rush to buy. Consider paying a truck mechanic and an RV repair place to inspect and provide an itemized price list for needed repairs and replacements on a prospective buy.
Bordercollie 08/30/20 10:16pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Looking for a good RV

There are a couple of Class C manufacturers that are considered "best". Lazy Days and Phoenix Cruisers as I recall. Winnebago and Jayco are also considered good brands, there are others. Most major brands offer "entry level" and higher grade rigs, some with gas engines, some with diesel power. I don't know of any detailed unbiased reviews ranking best workmanship, best features/amenities, and best dealer after-sale support. Try googling "best brands of Class C RV's". We own a 2004 Fleetwood Tioga 26Q bought new in 2003.I consider our rig of average housebox workmanship quality. We have replaced the fridge, roof AC unit, and the converter/charger and recently had the generator fuel system serviced and replaced the dual house batteries. Fleetwood Class C's are very common and many are used by rental companies. Do your homework and read advice on picking a rig that is best for you and your budget.
Bordercollie 08/30/20 09:21pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Switches in bathroom and fridge not working

One of the 110volt AC outlets may have a GFI reset button that needs to be pressed, hear it click.
Bordercollie 08/23/20 10:28am Class C Motorhomes
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