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 > Your search for posts made by 'CapriRacer' found 45 matches.

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RE: PSI rating variables

First, there ought to be a tire placard somewhere on the vehicle. I've heard it is common for that to be near the driver's front corner. What does it say for tire size and pressure? Use that as a first step. Second, it would be good to weigh the trailer - individual tire weights if possible - if not, at least axle by axle. Then you need to add a factor if you didn't get individual tire weights - 7% if axle by axle, 12% if all axles together. Then compare that to the load carrying capacity of the tires. I am of the opinion that tires should be loaded to more than 85% of their capacity at the pressure used. You never told us what tire size you have so I am wondering why anyone would think they could give you advice! Mix of LT's and ST's, yes! But are the numbers even the same? I am going to suggest you prioritize getting all the tires replaced. You're in Southern California, and the sun can really take a toll!
CapriRacer 10/26/20 07:03am Toy Haulers
"Goodyear Endurance Tire Failures"

Here's the link to the closed discussion: https://forums.goodsamclub.com/index.cfm/fuseaction/thread/tid/30102538/gotomsg/30158262.cfm#30158262 I didn't get to comment on the last post, so I am doing it here. First, thanks to cummins2014 for the help on the google key word search. That indeed brought up some complaints - HOWEVER - none of them on the first page were actual failures. They were ALL road hazard failures! This took me a couple of hours to wade through all the discussion threads brought up - and interestingly, there were many discussion covering the same points raised in this forum! Needless to say I am pretty peeved to have spent so much time on a fruitless search. Conclusion: There have been no reports of structural failures with the Goodyear Endurance ST tires - only road hazard related ones.
CapriRacer 10/22/20 07:57am Fifth-Wheels
RE: I need new Tires

At this point, it appears we have a "Yes, there are.... No, there aren't!" type of argument. Since one can't post a link to something that doesn't exist, then we need a links to posts where they are said to exist. I did a quick google search. but didn't find any posts, but maybe I am using key words that don't bring them up. As someone who is interested from a technical point of view, I am asking for help. Please!! Post some links. As said in my previous post I googled the Endurance ,and there was some reading to be had . Reports of lost tread , bubbles in the tread etc, and a few pictures . I googled Goodyear Endurance tire failures , and just telling what I read . If you want to read it google it same as I did, as was suggested by another on this thread, they apparently found the same reading I did. It was not difficult . They probably felt the same way I do about links, if you really want to know ,go looking, google it . Some have made claims that there are only road hazard problems with the Endurance, the links I read suggest otherwise ,seems to be a few defective tires. All I can say is read it ,and come to your own conclusion, you are the tire expert . Maybe you can give some light on these reports on the Endurance . If I remember correctly you gave a glowing report on Endurance awhile back , correct me if I am wrong . So I googled "Endurance" and no tire related stuff in the first 10 pages. I then googled "Goodyear Endurance", and 10 pages later, still didn't find any reported failures. So - again - links please.
CapriRacer 10/21/20 09:50am Fifth-Wheels
RE: I need new Tires

At this point, it appears we have a "Yes, there are.... No, there aren't!" type of argument. Since one can't post a link to something that doesn't exist, then we need a links to posts where they are said to exist. I did a quick google search. but didn't find any posts, but maybe I am using key words that don't bring them up. As someone who is interested from a technical point of view, I am asking for help. Please!! Post some links.
CapriRacer 10/21/20 06:23am Fifth-Wheels
RE: Goodyear Endurance Tires VS Carlisle Trail HD Tires

It might be time for me to mix things up a bit! 1) An ST tire carries much more load than a similar sized LT tire: LT235/85R16 LR E = 3085# @ 80 psi, ST235/85R16 LR E = 3640# @ 80 psi (+18%). That means that at least one of the government tests is more stringent for ST tires. 2) US Government testing procedures do NOT produce a tire that will perform well in the US market (This applies to Passenger Car tires, LT tires, AND ST tires!) Nowadays, the tire has to EXCEED the government minimums by a good percentage to perform adequately.
CapriRacer 10/12/20 04:50am Travel Trailers
RE: Tire Pressure Chart For Continental Tires

Please note that the Continental chart and the Toyo Chart are the same - and they came from the Tire and Rim Yearbook.
CapriRacer 09/28/20 06:33am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Tire Pressure Chart For Continental Tires

I can't seem to find a psi chart for Continental tires. Anyone on here that can steer me to one. Sorry, but Tire Load Tables are NOT specific to a brand of tires. They are published by tire standardizing organizations such The Tire and Rim Association (US based) and are the same regardless of the manufacturer. You can sometimes find portions of those tables published by tire manufacturers, but those are only reproductions of what the standardizing body published. So to answer your question: ANY table will work. Just make sure the table you use is appropriate to the application. There will be difference based on what kind of vehicle and the intended service. Then why do two different Michelin tires of the same size 295/80R22.5, the ZXA2 and the H Coach have different load tables, and why do my Toyo's of the same size have yet again different tables? Maybe that works for car tires, but it doesn't work for large truck/RV tires Because Michelin - in their infinite wisdom - didn't tell you that they modified the tables according to the service (in particular speed). Figures that Michelin would complicate something that is supposed to be simple! (Jadatis has a post above this one that explains in more detail.) As far as Toyo is concerned - I couldn't find a load table on the internet for any of their 295/80R22.5's. Do you have a link?
CapriRacer 09/27/20 07:06am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Tire Pressure Chart For Continental Tires

I can't seem to find a psi chart for Continental tires. Anyone on here that can steer me to one. Sorry, but Tire Load Tables are NOT specific to a brand of tires. They are published by tire standardizing organizations such The Tire and Rim Association (US based) and are the same regardless of the manufacturer. You can sometimes find portions of those tables published by tire manufacturers, but those are only reproductions of what the standardizing body published. So to answer your question: ANY table will work. Just make sure the table you use is appropriate to the application. There will be difference based on what kind of vehicle and the intended service.
CapriRacer 09/25/20 06:32am Class A Motorhomes
RE: tire pressure

Just so everyone knows: The burst pressure of a tire is many times the max pressure. Unless a tire is on fire, there is no risk of the tire bursting on its own without it being damaged by some object - even in Death Valley! Interesting...I know it would vary, all ST tires not being equal, in quality and design, but what would you consider a possible psi bursting point of the OPs GY Endurance E-rated tire, if air is continuously added? I know you can not give an exact psi, but maybe a range of psi guess? Jerry Over 200 psi!
CapriRacer 09/13/20 07:00am Fifth-Wheels
RE: tire pressure

Just so everyone knows: The burst pressure of a tire is many times the max pressure. Unless a tire is on fire, there is no risk of the tire bursting on its own without it being damaged by some object - even in Death Valley!
CapriRacer 09/12/20 06:07am Fifth-Wheels
RE: Question about tires

Jim, not to discredit the tire boys, but the manufacturer of the OP's tires says they are LT tires, which I suspect is true with a max psi of 51 and 2,535 LR. ..... Sorry, but here's another correction: 1) P type Standard Load tires will have a max pressure of either 35 psi, 2.5 bar (36 psi), 44 psi, or 51 psi. A P type XL (Extra Load) tire will have a max pressure of either 41 psi or 50 psi. 2) An LT tire will have a max pressure of 50 psi (Load Range C), 65 psi (Load Range D), 80 psi (LR E). etc. (with some exceptions) 3) It is common for tire manufacturers to put letters in the model name of the tire including LT, ST, HT, etc. This does NOT mean the tire is an Special Trailer, Light Truck, or Heavy Truck, etc. type tire. Those designation are in the SIZE - and in the case of ST and LT tires, they are explicit. (others, like P type, they are implicit.) You may find some exceptions to the above as not everyone has a good understanding of how this works. For example, there are several tire manufacturers who put on the sidewall of their Standard Load P type tires: Max Load XXXX pounds @ max pressure 44 psi. This is sort of incorrect as the max load occurs at 35 psi, but 44 psi is the permissible max pressure with no increase in load. Yes, I know it is confusing.
CapriRacer 09/09/20 06:54am Towing
RE: Question about tires

^^^^^Exactly!! Many things you read are lawyer speak, or marketing, but nothing beats years of experience, actually towing in many situations. While CapriRacer may remember what he read, he obviously has no experience with 1,000 lbs siting on the hitch of a 1/2 ton truck. If the tire is marked xxxx capacity at 51 psi, on the OPs truck, then 30 lbs just isn't a wise decision, with 4k sitting on that rear axle. Jerry What I was referring to was this: " ..... you need to air up to get full use of tire load capability. ..... " That implies that the full load carrying capacity occurs at the max pressure - and that is generally NOT true! But I do agree that adding a bit more pressure does help with stability. Oh, and I towed my racecar all over the southeast, so Yes!!, I do know a bit about towing.
CapriRacer 09/04/20 05:32am Towing
RE: Question about tires

The door sticker is for best ride, but for towing heavy, you need to air up to get full use of tire load capability. Like mentioned full pressure in rear, and try about 42 in the front. A bit of trial, to know what handles best, after all hooked up and towing. Jerry Nope! That's not right. The inflation pressure on the sticker on the doorframe includes the max load (GAWR's) and unless specified otherwise, includes the towing limitations published by the vehicle manufacturer.
CapriRacer 09/03/20 06:40am Towing
RE: Poor Tire Install

A couple of thoughts: Determining if a tire failed due to a road hazard is not something an amateur can do very well. Even after 20 years of doing it, I occasionally screw up! I have found that I am much more successful if I can examine the inside of the tire. Trying to find a cut or puncture from the outside is pretty difficult. "The outer side wall had completely separated from the tire right at the edge of the tread." This is a classic run flat condition. That leads me to believe this was a puncture related failure. Plus the mention of an sudden explosion further leads me to believe in a road hazard. Innertubes? Yes that is puzzling. It's quite possible that the tube failed. I have found that valve holes for tubeless wheels are not mounted in the best location for tubes. I don't like the excuse that if the tire doesn't seal, they put in a tube. Tubes are relatively expensive compared to what fixing the wheel seal would cost. On the other hand, there are a lot of wackos working in tire shops. Based on that experience I wouldn't give those guys any more business.
CapriRacer 08/18/20 04:52am Towing
RE: Question about tires

I have been learning a lot about tongue weight and payload capacity lately, but I have not even looked into tire capacity and weight rating at all. I am going to need some help with this. So my truck has Goodyear 275/55R20 113T tires. It says the treadwear is 500, Traction B, Temperature B. It also says the max load is 2535 lbs, and max psi is 51. My GAWR on my truck with those tires is 4000 lbs on the front, and 4150 lbs on the rear. Ok, with that information, how do I figure out if I am good to tow a 7,000 lbs GVWR trailer, with 680 lbs of dry tongue weight without having a tire blowout? I heard something that you need D or E rated tires if you are going to tow. But it looks like my tires can handle 2535 lbs each, so shouldnt i be fine? This isn't enough information to answer your question. You need to look up the towing capacity as specified by the vehicle manufacturer - might be in the owners manual.
CapriRacer 08/10/20 07:07am Towing
RE: Tires

Before you all jump on me abut inflation and weight, etc. I always check my tires and make sure they are aired up to 95 lbs (as called for)...Well, this weekend, one of my Chinese tire bombs blew on me on the way home from a trip. The tires are 235 85 R 16. I am looking at the Endurance. Weird thing is that the OEM tires say load range F and Endurance are E. When I look at inflation rates per Goodyear, they say I can hit the same rating by airing up to 95 lbs or 100 even though tires say 80lbs. So are people still happy with Endurance? My only requirement is tires made in North America, preferably the USA. You need a Load Range F (max pressure = 95 psi!) not a Load Range E (max pressure = 80 psi!). What that means is you can't use the Goodyear Endurance. This may also mean you can't use any tires made in the US.
CapriRacer 08/10/20 07:01am Fifth-Wheels
RE: New camper coming has nitrogen filled tires

....Nitrogen doesn't expand and contract as much as typical air from a compressor due to moisture ...... Sorry, but ALL gases behave pretty close to the Ideal Gas Law: PV = nRT. That is, they build up pressure when they heat up. That includes nitrogen and water vapor! The only exception is when you have liquid water in the tire - and even then, it eventually disappears (migrates outside the tire due to the Law of Partial Pressure of Gases.)
CapriRacer 07/18/20 05:47am Travel Trailers
RE: tire pressure

I have an Itasca Sunova 35j, and posted on the driver's side of the coach it says 80 psi cold all tires. I have 6 19.5 Michelins and on the sidewall it's stamped 120 psi cold. I've always split the difference on the road. If we're at 100 psi all around, we're rolling. I'm just curious how the rest of you navigate that; I mean 40 psi is a big discrepancy. Thanks for any feedback. Are the tire sizes the same? I almost sounds like the original tires - the ones listed on the vehicle tire placard - were 235/85R16 Load Range E (80 psi max). If that is the case, then those 19.5's are probably an upgrade. Oh and a Rule of Thumb: You don't want to get more than a 10% increase in pressure between cold and running. If you get more, then you need to slow down and think about getting tires with more load carrying capacity. (Maybe that's what happened here?) If you get 15% or more, you need to take immediate action. Slow down AND get tires with more load capacity - within a week!
CapriRacer 07/18/20 05:39am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Unusual tire wear

...I know that it is a common belief that tires worn on both the outer edges are always always caused by under-inflation. I would like to question that...... And you are right to do so. My experience is that steer tires wear on the shoulders and drive tires wear in the center and that this phenomenon is much stronger than over/under inflation. Besides, most tire manufacturers are doing what they can to reduce uneven wear - even uneven wear caused by over/under inflation and the steer/drive phenomenon I mentioned above.
CapriRacer 07/13/20 05:41am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Mission Load Max Radial crowned like a bias ply.

The one on the left is EXACTLY what mine looks like, though not as pronounced. I don't have any other tires of that brand to compare it to, but the promotional photos for the brand show a nice square flat profile. Finally got pictures but it looks like I need an external photo hosting site. Don't belong to one. Don't want to belong to one. So you're just going to have to use your imagination. The tire is dated 2004 but is still supple and has no weather checking. Still had 55PSI in it when I let the air out this afternoon. I only want to use it for a farm wagon, and a spare at that. Will only be inflated to 30-40PSI most likely. A tire that is bulged out as shown above is separated! It has failed!! It's just that the belt is still trying to hold it together. Using the tire further will cause it to come apart - SUDDENLY and doing damage in the process!! DO NOT USE A TIRE THAT LOOKS LIKE THAT!!
CapriRacer 06/27/20 06:58am Towing
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