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 > Your search for posts made by 'Chum lee' found 361 matches.

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RE: gelcoat sun damaged after 1.5 years. yay winnebago :-(

"I'm considering a boat shop, just let them do their magic. anyway, any tips would be appreciated." I think you answered your own question. Just go to a boat shop that regularly does fiberglass repairs in house rather than sending it out. Be prepared for some sticker shock. What does Winnebago say, if anything? A call might be worth your while. IMO, a little more durability could be expected. Chum lee
Chum lee 07/15/19 01:46pm General RVing Issues
RE: Owners Manual

A quick search shows that you most likely have a Ford F53 chassis with a V10. You should think of your MH as TWO separate entities. The chassis, made by Ford, and the coach, made/assembled by Mountain High Coachworks. You should be able to find a Ford Owners manual online. Google is your friend. You should also be able to find a Ford Factory Shop/Service manual with wiring diagrams FOR THE CHASSIS ONLY. (if you are so inclined) For the coach, you'll most likely have to rely on the individual component manufacturers owner/operators/installation manuals which are available online. Google is your friend, again. There is fairly good documentation available for things like the generator, water heater, rooftop A/C units, furnace, refrigerator, converter, water pump, toilet, stairs, etc. Just find the model# (on the unit itself) and have the year handy when researching. It's not a newer car, its an older motor home. Chum lee
Chum lee 07/13/19 04:23pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: Campground Breakers - EDITED

Simple answer, yes .... breakers do wear out if tripped and/or flipped on and off a lot. (some are more resilient to off-on / and-or / being blown where others are not.) Age and wear does play a factor. Yep! Male and female receptacles/plugs wear out/break too. From electrical engineering 101: LCL or Long Continuous Loads require that conductors/circuits be derated for reliable service in continuous highly loaded conditions. (like what is happening in this case) 50 amps doesn't always mean 50 reliable amps. (2 circuits in this case) Chum lee
Chum lee 07/13/19 12:27pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: 1979 dodge mobile traveler 360cl wont pass emissions

First things first. ALL gasoline fueled vehicles produce CO2 when they are running. Period. Generally, for emissions testing, CO2 content is noted as a %, but, not tested. You probably mean CO, or, carbon monoxide, not carbon dioxide. (CO2) Very different animals. In order to be helpful, you have to post the actual tested CO content in the exhaust gas to make a meaningful diagnosis. Your failed emissions test results must tell you what that value is. You should also post the maximum allowable CO content in the exhaust gas, usually as a PPM value. (Parts Per Million) It's helpful if you post ALL the test results along with their MAX allowable values. If you don't do that, chances are you are wasting your time in this format. Chum lee EDIT: Your test results should look similar to what landyacht318 posted above. I don't know if Utah still does the same but there should be two sets of test results. One at 15 mph (low speed/load) and one at 25 mph. (higher speed/load) California is one of the most restrictive states in the USA. You must pass both low and higher speed tests to pass the test. (at least in California) Utah may vary.
Chum lee 07/13/19 12:11pm Tech Issues
RE: What gauge wire do I use

"If you want someone to come and steal your copper wire, use 4 gauge." I think he mentioned underground wire. You need to get out more. At $2.30/lb. (currently), 3 - #4 copper wires add up fast. (a rhetorical question) What makes you think that if something is buried in conduit, (even directly) it's safe from theft? It happens all the time, nice long runs make it even more appealing. Chum lee
Chum lee 07/12/19 12:31pm Tech Issues
RE: What gauge wire do I use

I like to think of wire gauge like this. (from an engineers perspective) With a 30 amp 120 volt circuit and a 200' run: If you want the system to work reliably at least 80% of the time use 12 gauge copper wire. (chance of fire exists) If you want the system to work reliably 90% of the time or more use 10 gauge copper wire. (chance of fire exists but is quite low) If you want the system to work reliably 95% of the time or more use 8 gauge copper wire. If you want the system to work reliably more than 99% of the time use 6 gauge copper wire. If you want someone to come and steal your copper wire, use 4 gauge. You don't get to decide when the system fails to work reliably. You do get to decide the chances of how reliable it will be if/when it works. It's kind of like the weather. Even if there is a 100% chance of rain, . . . it's still just a chance. Chum lee What are the odds for failure over an extended period? Say it's a hot day and A/C runs all day putting a heavy load on those wires. The heat builds up over time as the load increases and the chance of a failure do also. Using the proper size wire minimizes that risk potential. Where's the economy if you install a wire that's too small and burns up, then need to do the whole job over again with a larger size wire? That's EXACTLY my point. How reliable do you want your system to be? Odds are just odds. In this example, nobody can predict how an individual user will load the system. To the OP's question, MY answer is: "If you want the system to work reliably more than 99% of the time use 6 gauge copper wire. Whatever bean counter rational anybody decides to use is up to them. If you like fires and damaged equipment, then ignore the codes and go with 12 gauge wire. Don't like fires? Then spend some money on wire and buy some safety factor. How much safety factor do you want? That's up to you and your budget. It's not that hard. Do you feel lucky? MEX: This is my advice for a very general example. In any case where SPECIFIC DEDICATED LOADS are well defined, the above WOULD NOT necessarily be my advice. Chum lee
Chum lee 07/12/19 12:10pm Tech Issues
RE: Was rear ended on the highway

I've always had good experiences with USAA. That said, right now say as little as possible to the adjuster(s), especially with regard to your physical condition. Let a doctors report(s) do that. Let the police report, if one exists, describe the accident. Not you. Remember, everything you say (to anyone) can and WILL be used against you and may jeopardize your case. "I don't recall right now I'm in too much pain." is a good response. Don't hesitate to consult with an attorney at your earliest convenience. You need not discuss the fact that you did/did not with anyone . . . . yet. It sounds like there are some major damages. You are playing a game with professionals, don't think you are smarter than they are. They do this everyday for a living, unfortunately you have to for a while. BTDT! Chum lee
Chum lee 07/11/19 03:00pm General RVing Issues
RE: What gauge wire do I use

I like to think of wire gauge like this. (from an engineers perspective) With a 30 amp 120 volt circuit and a 200' run: If you want the system to work reliably at least 80% of the time use 12 gauge copper wire. (chance of fire exists) If you want the system to work reliably 90% of the time or more use 10 gauge copper wire. (chance of fire exists but is quite low) If you want the system to work reliably 95% of the time or more use 8 gauge copper wire. If you want the system to work reliably more than 99% of the time use 6 gauge copper wire. If you want someone to come and steal your copper wire, use 4 gauge. You don't get to decide when the system fails to work reliably. You do get to decide the chances of how reliable it will be if/when it works. It's kind of like the weather. Even if there is a 100% chance of rain, . . . it's still just a chance. Chum lee
Chum lee 07/11/19 02:34pm Tech Issues
RE: Travel to the USA

"Do the border "guys" do a walk through or fridge check?" The answer is, . . . . . sometimes. Do you feel lucky? A lot depends on how you act, how you look, your vehicle, and the inspectors current state of mind. I know, I know, they (law enforcement) say they don't profile, but, that hasn't been my experience. Sometimes they check everyone, sometimes the computer just singles you out, and sometimes you're just unlucky and you find yourselves in secondary for the full monty. Most food items are cheaper in the USA so unless there is something special that you can't buy here, don't take the chance. Make sure any prescription medications are current and have clear labels with your name on them. Declare cash amounts over $10,000 US. Wire transfers are safer. Chum lee
Chum lee 07/10/19 05:13pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: 100 amp service

Or..do you just run the generator when you can't find or arrange 100 amp service? IMO, continuously doing the above in any reputable RV park that provides electric service would be STRONGLY discouraged. If your immediate neighbors don't say anything, the management most likely will. Chum lee
Chum lee 07/09/19 06:06pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: brake pads

We had a left front brake flex line fail on our previous Chevy powered '79 Delta Class C , as you described, it almost threw us off a cliff on US 101. It would be good to know how often flexible front brake lines should be replaced for safety sake. Unfortunately, the industry usually replaces brake lines based on a visual inspection or performance complaint and there is no standard replacement interval. In the old days, the flexible lines were supposed to be inspected every time a "mechanic" was under the vehicle during the standard service interval. (6 months or 6,000 miles) Nowadays, that doesn't happen. (unless you do it yourself or specifically request it) Chum lee
Chum lee 07/08/19 02:42pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: 1996 F53 Motorhome Radiator?

If its the original factory radiator, you might want to take it to a radiator shop (if they still exist in your area) and see if they can repair it. The technician will probably have to be at least 50 years old. Ford used some pretty good radiators in their truck chassis. But, time and poor maintenance usually take their toll on everything. Nothing lasts forever. Just a thought. A new radiator that matches the specs of the old factory unit can be in the thousands. (US dollars) Chum lee
Chum lee 07/08/19 02:26pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: Running Air Conditioner Via Inverter while Towing/Driving

NRALIFR wrote: "Don’t doubt a determined fabricator." Somehow, . . . . . . I believe you! There could be a new reality TV show here somewhere. I've always liked people with an attitude like yours. Make America Great Again! (Re)Build it from the ground up. Chum lee
Chum lee 07/08/19 02:15pm Tech Issues
RE: Fiberglass wall bubble

A picture is worth a thousand words. Chum lee
Chum lee 07/07/19 03:22pm Tech Issues
RE: Switch to houseboat?

Why choose one or the other? Clicky-clicky. That's an interesting idea and probably the most practical one I've seen so far. (as far as converting a normal RV for aquatic use) What does one do with a 60' long, 16' wide hull (a barge really) when you AREN'T using it? It's a little oversize for most fresh water marina slips. Can you trailer that hull? Hummmmmmm. Economic lake rentals? (just add your RV) Chum lee
Chum lee 07/05/19 01:06pm General RVing Issues
RE: Can anyone recommend a tankless on demand water heater?

Rather than building your own, I think you would be better off going on YouTube and watching a few "Wonderhussy" videos. Sarah knows the location every natural hot spring west of the Rockies. She visits them regularly and documents most of her adventures on YouTube. (no affiliation) Chum lee
Chum lee 07/02/19 02:19pm Tech Issues
RE: Switch to houseboat?

Has anyone ever considered switching to a houseboat? I'm getting tired of these 50 buck a night campground fees. Everyplace we go there's a nice lake to stay on free. W'd stay for a month or so. I'd have to pay for pump outs, maybe a launch fee or two, run a generator some but other than that, why not???? Once I sold the class A and put that down on the boat, the savings in CG fees would pay for the boat wouldn't it? When all is said and done, in the long run, I can't think of any houseboat that would be cheaper to own/operate than a similar sized Class A motorhome of similar vintage. Now, . . . . . if you want to compare a houseboat to an aircraft, . . . . . you may have a valid point. Chum lee
Chum lee 07/01/19 06:30pm General RVing Issues
RE: I hate dinettes

Dinette? What dinette? Where mine used to be in my 30' long no slide Class A was replaced with a built-in 6'-0" long desk with drawers (underneath) on both sides. A very comfortable multi adjustable wheeled office chair now functions as my command center when parked. It's perfect for me. The desk is about 22" wide so the center aisle is now wider than when the dinette was there giving more space in the kitchen area. Guests now sit on the jackknife sofa or the 360 degree captains chairs. (3 in front) I wouldn't have it any other way. The RV still sleeps 3, . . . . 4 in a pinch. When I bought the RV used, the previous owner actually discounted the price because there was no dinette/drop down bed. Chum lee
Chum lee 06/30/19 02:23pm General RVing Issues
RE: Battery corrosion

The metal brackets that hold down the batteries tend to collect a lot of "white" stuff. I've cleaned them many times using battery cleaner and then spraying with battery protector. Terminals themselves are clean it's just the hold down brackets. Any suggestions on how to deal with this? Not sure what batteries you are talking about. You can buy a plastic (non-corrosive) hold down for your chassis battery(s). Problem solved. You can paint (clean well and use epoxy paint) the metal hold down clamps commonly used on the coach batteries. Are you overfilling/overcharging the coach batteries? That eventually tends to bubble the acid out of the battery(s) which then gets all over the battery compartment. Rinsing/brushing regularly with baking soda/water solution is your economical friend. Chum lee
Chum lee 06/29/19 01:33pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: Locks on Propane tanks?

The propane tank on our Class A has a door with a lock, so no reason not to lock yours. That will keep the opportunist from taking your tanks, but not someone determined. I was very surprised to read that your motorhome has a locking propane compartment. I've owned 8 motorhomes and the propane compartment was the ONLY one that didn't have a lock on it. Your motorhome is much newer than ours so I'm wondering if the newer ones now come with a locking compartment. It will be interesting to hear other replies. No lock on my 1999 Class A propane basement compartment. All other basement doors have locks except the generator. Since there are significant fire safety issues with both compartments, I prefer that the doors stay open all the time. Both compartments are open from below anyway. Chum lee
Chum lee 06/28/19 12:19pm General RVing Issues
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