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 > Your search for posts made by 'Hikerdogs' found 13 matches.

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RE: Crash Guards on Towed

Could have posted this in several places but it applies to Motorhoem Owners in this case. Roadmaster did offer crash guards/brush guards that plugged int into the horns of the baseplate, but no more. They really didn't market them. We now have a 2019 Edge ST and it uses mounts that are roudn, and more like Blue ox perhaps. We have a lot of deer in our area, in our yard and even on the porches..and even a few cattle that get out from behind the fence..In Az we saw lots of Pronghorns and some hti by cars and Elk and Javelinas. I can buy a crash guard as used on patrol cars but...I would not be able to mount it, I believe without removing the Roadmaster base plate. I may bee wrong about this. Has anyone mounted a crash gaurd on their towed vehicle in particular a Ford Edge ST or know of equpmetn that can be used We've hti more than one deer and it is costly. I'm not sure what you're referring to when you make the statement "crash guards/brush guards that plugged into the horns of the baseplate". However they did offer the "Guardian Rock Shield". https://roadmasterinc.com/products/protection_storage/protect_store.php If this is what you're looking for it's still listed as a product on their website. They are available from etrailer, amazon, and many other retailers.
Hikerdogs 04/19/20 06:52am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Access to Grey Water Holding Tank

I don't think you really want to access either the black or grey tanks unless absolutely necessary. We had to do it in our 2001 Adventurer and it was a royal PITA. First off you have to remove a couple of the side panels. They're held in place by screws on a top and bottom flange. To get to the screws you have to remove the trim belt. Once the trim and panels are removed you have to remove a set of sheet metal panels between the main floor and the sub floor. Once the screws are removed you have to get a thin putty knife under the sheet metal and slowly break the caulking type seal. The sheet metal panels are thin and the glue/caulking is strong. It takes lots of patience to keep from destroying the panels. Once you gain access to the tanks you'll find there's very little room to work on them. You have to be a bit of a contortionist just to get to the plumbing connections. We had a leak where the fitting from the toilet meets the black tank. We didn't know it until we had driven about 250 miles and were pulling in the drive. As we went up the slope you could see black gummy crud dripping out the back of the motorhome. It took several hours to access the tanks, and another couple hours to flush out the smelly goo. Once everything was clean It was a real chore to get into the area and find the problem. Once we found the problem we quickly realized the repair was beyond our capabilities. We didn't have the tools or components to replace the broken connection to the tank. In the end we took the motorhome to the Forest City service center. Even though we had already gained access to the tanks it took the better part of a day to repair the connection. We stayed overnight and they leak tested and reinstalled the panels the following day. It's not a process I would wish to repeat. If we have a similar problem in the future the motorhome will go directly to Forest City.
Hikerdogs 03/28/20 06:43am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Coleman Heat Pump blowing cold air

The roof AC units on some models are also heat pumps. As mentioned earlier the system is reversed when in the heat pump mode. If you get warm air for a short time then it turns cool or cold the evaporator is frosting over. There should be a temperature sensor stuck in the coil. When it senses the coil has frosted over it will shut down the compressor (fan will keep running) until the frost melts. Either the sensor is defective or it is no longer positioned properly. In most cases it's either a small probe wedged between the fins, or a button that's held to the side of the condensor with double sided tape.
Hikerdogs 02/27/20 06:57pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: Brake problem

It doaesn't take much heat to boil DOT 3 brake fluid when it becomes satureated with water. Dot# 3 is the original brake fluid installed on your 2001 chassis. The dry boiling point is 401*F or 205*C. When it becomes saturated (4% water) the boiling point is lowered to 284*F or 140*C. Remember when you step on the brakes you're changing the energy of inertia to heat. Most motorhomes today come with either DOT 4 or Dot 5.1 brake fluid. The DOT 4 has a dry boiling point of 230*C or 446*F and a wet boiling point of 155C or 311*F. In most cases vehicles that were originally equpiied with DOT 3 fluid can be changed to DOT 4. It's not advisable to mix them, but when the system is flushed DOT 4 can be used to replace the DOT 3. The most recent fluid used is DOT 5.1. This fluid has a dry boiling point of 270*C or 518*F, and a wet boiling point of 190*C or 374*F. Unfortunately in most cases it cannot be used to replace either DOT 3 or DOT4. It is not compatible with the rubber parts in the system. To further confuse things there is also DOT 5.0 fluid in the market. It is a silicone based fluid primarily used in racing and aircraft applications. It does not absorbe water like the other styles therefore has limited long term use. Since it does not absorb water any water in the system will gravitate to the lowest point. In cold weather it can freeze and block the flow to the calipers. If left too long in the system it can cause the lines to rust through. This fluid is also not compatible with the rubber parts in most production vehicles. In systems where it is used it needs to be changed on a regular basis to avoid the fore mentioned problems.
Hikerdogs 09/19/19 07:01am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Ford Questions

2 of the "exposed lug nuts" 180* from each other should have a horizontal slash across the wrench lands. Those nuts need to be removed with the T wrench to remove the hub cap. As for the "Tow/Haul" button (5 and 6 speed transmissions) it changes the shift points, but still allows the transmission to go into overdrive. The "OD" button on the 4 speed (4R100) does lock out overdrive. An additional feature of the 5 and 6 speed transmissions is when the Tow/Haul mode is engaged it will also provide engine braking. To slow the vehicle when going down hill with Tow/Haul engaged depress the brake pedal for 1 second or longer. If the speed increases more than 3 mph the transmission will downshift to the next lower gear if is within ithe safe RPM range. Cruise control will perform a similar function. If going down hill with the cruise engaged it will downshift to the next lower gear maintain the set speed if it's within the safe RPM range.
Hikerdogs 09/08/19 07:12pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: Things getting out of hand

I don't understand what's happening here. You pay your storage place to do maintenance? They fill your tanks for you? Is this common stuff? My storage lot is literally a parking lot lol. I pay to store my RV there, that's it. Are you allowed to use their water to fill up, or is it only available if you pay them to fill it for you? Yeah, I don't get that part either. I see it's indoor storage but sounds like storage plus valet service. That's what it sounds like to me. Not only are they performing "services" that are normally done by the owner, they are charging truck shop prices to do menial work. The going labor rate at truck shops in our area is $140.00 per hour for mechanical repairs. However they have a schedule for standard maintenance items that is considerably less expensive. Charging $140.00 per hour to fill a water tank or change a water filter is outrageous. Then again if you're not willing or able to do it yourself you can't expect someone else to do it for free. It's time to find a less expensive storage facility/valet service, or spend the money one time to install the needed conveniences at your home. Our drive is about half the length of yours with no turn around option. Every time we bring the motorhome to the house we back it up the drive. To accomplish the tasks you are paying $140.00 an hour for we installed a 30 amp and 50 amp service, and water and sewer connections to the house systems. In our case we hired an electrician to install the outlets, and I tapped into the sewer system in the garage to dump the tanks. Fresh water was available in the garage and at outdoor faucets. It takes about 100' of garden hose to go from the water source in the garage to the motorhome. You can probably have the electrical and plumbing connections installed for $1,000.00 or less. That's a one time expense that would be recovered in a couple years or less if you're utilizing the "valet" service 3 or more times a year.
Hikerdogs 08/29/19 06:41am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Things getting out of hand

I don't understand what's happening here. You pay your storage place to do maintenance? They fill your tanks for you? Is this common stuff? My storage lot is literally a parking lot lol. I pay to store my RV there, that's it. That's what it sounds like to me. Not only are they performing "services" that are normally done by the owner, they are charging truck shop prices to do menial work. The going labor rate at truck shops in our area is $140.00 per hour for mechanical repairs. However they have a schedule for standard maintenance items that is considerably less expensive. Charging $140.00 per hour to fill a water tank or change a water filter is outrageous. Then again if you're not willing or able to do it yourself you can't expect someone else to do it for free. It's time to find a less expensive storage facility/valet service, or spend the money one time to install the needed conveniences at your home. Our drive is about half the length of yours with no turn around option. Every time we bring the motorhome to the house we back it up the drive. To accomplish the tasks you are paying $140.00 an hour for we installed a 30 amp and 50 amp service, and water and sewer connections to the house systems. In our case we hired an electrician to install the outlets, and I tapped into the sewer system in the garage to dump the tanks. Fresh water was available in the garage and at outdoor faucets. It takes about 100' of garden hose to go from the water source in the garage to the motorhome. You can probably have the electrical and plumbing connections installed for $1,000.00 or less. That's a one time expense that would be recovered in a couple years or less if you're utilizing the "valet" service 3 or more times a year.
Hikerdogs 08/29/19 06:39am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Does Your State Require a SBS

Wisconsin like Washington requires supplimental braking on ANYTHING being towed that weighs over 3,000 lbs. Unlike Washington a towed vhhicle can be towed at the posted speed limit just like a trailer. While there is no "law" stating it Ford says the F53 chassis brakes are rated for the GVWR not the GCWR. They also state that ANYTHING being towed that weighs over 1,500 lbs. should have supplimental brakes. So if you're towing a vehicle with a motorhome built on the F53 chassis and the combined weight of the motorhome and towed vehicle exceeds the GVWR, or the towed vehicle itself exceeds 1,500 lbs. you should have a supplimental braking system. The "over 1,500 lb." clause pretty much covers every 4 wheel vehicle built in the last 50 years.
Hikerdogs 08/08/19 06:50pm Dinghy Towing
RE: Non-binding Tow Bar

Regardless of manufacturer claims there are always some conditions that will cause a tow bar to bind. Those conditions might include attempting to disconnect when the toad is at an extreme angle to the motorhome, the toad significantly higher or lower than the motorhome, or at an extreme side to side angle from the motorhome. That being said the non binding bars do a much better job than those that don't have that feature. The non binding feature is simply a difference in the angle that the locking caams lock into the extension rods. The non binding ones have a sloped angle on the cam and a taperd slot in the bars. The standard versions have a more square cut cam and square cut slot in the bars. Our first tow bar was a Roadmater Sterling. It was not a non binding design, but if the toad was relatively in line with the motorhome it would work fine. It was destroyed in an accident and replaced with a Roadmaster Sterling All Terrain, which is a non binding tow bar. This one is slightly more forgiving in that the toad doesn't have to be nearly as well aligned to the motorhome for it to work properly. We used the previous bar for 110,000 miles with no problems. We have about 35,000 miles on the new one, again with no problems.
Hikerdogs 08/03/19 04:00am Dinghy Towing
RE: F-53 Axle vent

Several companies offer a vent tube cap that eliminates the problem of bugs and debris. Both our motorhomes had these caps installed on the vent tube. I assumed they came from Ford, but looking for a Ford part number has so far been unsuccessful. They may have been installed at the Winnebago factory, at their service center in Forest City, or by our local Ford garage. I suspect the latter in that this dealership also sells Jeeps, and the caps are almost identical to those on the vent tubes of our Jeep Wrangler.
Hikerdogs 07/28/19 04:49pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: Winnebago vs Tiffin

Generally in the Itasca they put a better grade of materials and components in it. The Itasca will have standard things that are an option in the same model Winnebago That was true in 2001 when we bought our first Winnebago, but the differences vanished by 2013 when we bought our current motorhome. We visited several dealers trying to decide whether to purchase a Winnebago Adventurer or an Itasca Suncruiser. The Suncruiser listed for about $3,000.00 more than an identically equipped Adventurer. When we asked the sales people why the difference in price we never got any good answers. We emailed Winnebago asking for a list of differences and got back a list of 16 differences between the models. 15 of the 16 differences were badging in that one model would be badged as an Itasca where the other would be badged as a Winnebago. Likewise on would have the Suncruiser nameplate while the other would have an Adventurer nameplate. The only real difference between the two was that the Suncruiser offered 1 interior color scheme that was not offered on the Adventurer. Other than that all the systems, appliances, standard equipment, and options were identical. Still not sure which model to purchase we were able to take a private tour of the production facility and several completed coaches at the factory. We asked our tour guide (a senior training manager) which one would be the best value. His immediate response was the Winnebago Adventurer. He said the quality was equal, the price was slightly lower, the name recognition was better, and the resale value would be higher. One thing we were also alerted to was that (at least at the time) is that any component either standard or optional on any other Winnebago product can be ordered as an option on any other coach as long as it will physically fit in the coach you are ordering. At the time a 6 way power passengers seat and a couple other options were not offered on the Adventurer or Suncruiser models. They were however available on the Journey. We were able to order those options even though they were not listed in any brochure or ordering form. The Itasca nameplate has recently been dropped from the lineup, but models like the Sunstar and Sunova formerly in the Itasca lineup are now offered under the Winnebago nameplate
Hikerdogs 07/21/19 09:24am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Battery corrosion

Many batteries have the vent in the center of the top plate like this: https://www.centennialbatteries.com/centennial-commercial-heavy-duty-battery-c-31-10st-group-31 Unfortunately this is also where the battery hold down bracket is positioned. Our Buick Lucerne had this arrangement, but it also had a tube fitted over the vent that extended below the battery case. I copied this system for our house batteries using clear vinyl tubing. The tube is secured to the vent with a small wire tie. It extends below the battery box and a couple inches below the frame rail. Itis also wire tied to the frame rail. The tubing has been in place 2 years and the hold down bracket and frame rail are still corrosion free.
Hikerdogs 07/01/19 02:18am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Brake controller

To warm this topic up again. Because of health reasons I was not able to install anything. Now i am working on it again. I was able to locate the hidden connector under the dash of my unit, and plugged the controller in, and all lights are on. My problem is, how to find the other connector under the F53 chassis to connect the trailer plug outlet to? Where would I find the connector? Can anybody enlighten me? I have to be able to explain it to my niece, who will crawl for me underneath the motorhome, because I cannot do this anymore. She is 35 and very handy with tools! But I have to tell her what to do. It's possible the wire for the brakes was never run from the original Ford harness to the trailer socket at the rear of the coach. The wire runs along the outside of the drivers side frame rail inside a wire loom to the end of the frame rail supplied by Ford. It's a #10 blue wire. Ford folded back and taped the wires inside the loom. Open the loom at the joint of the Ford supplied frame and the frame extensions added by the body builder. There should be a tag on each of the wires identifying their purpose. The wire for the brakes is clearly marked either "Brakes" or "Trailer Brakes". The body builder extends them from this point to the rear of the coach. That particular wire was not connected on our 2001 Winnebago Adventurer built on the Ford F53 chassis. When I inquired as to why it was never connected I was told that it was done by the dealer only if they were aware that the customer was towing a trailer or dolly that had electric brakes. On our newer (2013) motorhome the wire runs in a loom down the inside of the passengers side frame rail. Winnebago now connects all the wires to the trailer socket.
Hikerdogs 06/19/19 06:50am Dinghy Towing
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