Good Sam Club Open Roads Forum: Search
Open Roads Forum Already a member? Login here.   If not, Register Today!  |  Help

Newest  |  Active  |  Popular  |  RVing FAQ Forum Rules  |  Forum Posting Help and Support  |  Contact  



Open Roads Forum  >  Search the Forums

 > Your search for posts made by 'Hikerdogs' found 19 matches.

Sort by:    Search within results:
  Subject Author Date Posted Forum
RE: Brake problem

It doaesn't take much heat to boil DOT 3 brake fluid when it becomes satureated with water. Dot# 3 is the original brake fluid installed on your 2001 chassis. The dry boiling point is 401*F or 205*C. When it becomes saturated (4% water) the boiling point is lowered to 284*F or 140*C. Remember when you step on the brakes you're changing the energy of inertia to heat. Most motorhomes today come with either DOT 4 or Dot 5.1 brake fluid. The DOT 4 has a dry boiling point of 230*C or 446*F and a wet boiling point of 155C or 311*F. In most cases vehicles that were originally equpiied with DOT 3 fluid can be changed to DOT 4. It's not advisable to mix them, but when the system is flushed DOT 4 can be used to replace the DOT 3. The most recent fluid used is DOT 5.1. This fluid has a dry boiling point of 270*C or 518*F, and a wet boiling point of 190*C or 374*F. Unfortunately in most cases it cannot be used to replace either DOT 3 or DOT4. It is not compatible with the rubber parts in the system. To further confuse things there is also DOT 5.0 fluid in the market. It is a silicone based fluid primarily used in racing and aircraft applications. It does not absorbe water like the other styles therefore has limited long term use. Since it does not absorb water any water in the system will gravitate to the lowest point. In cold weather it can freeze and block the flow to the calipers. If left too long in the system it can cause the lines to rust through. This fluid is also not compatible with the rubber parts in most production vehicles. In systems where it is used it needs to be changed on a regular basis to avoid the fore mentioned problems.
Hikerdogs 09/19/19 07:01am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Ford Questions

2 of the "exposed lug nuts" 180* from each other should have a horizontal slash across the wrench lands. Those nuts need to be removed with the T wrench to remove the hub cap. As for the "Tow/Haul" button (5 and 6 speed transmissions) it changes the shift points, but still allows the transmission to go into overdrive. The "OD" button on the 4 speed (4R100) does lock out overdrive. An additional feature of the 5 and 6 speed transmissions is when the Tow/Haul mode is engaged it will also provide engine braking. To slow the vehicle when going down hill with Tow/Haul engaged depress the brake pedal for 1 second or longer. If the speed increases more than 3 mph the transmission will downshift to the next lower gear if is within ithe safe RPM range. Cruise control will perform a similar function. If going down hill with the cruise engaged it will downshift to the next lower gear maintain the set speed if it's within the safe RPM range.
Hikerdogs 09/08/19 07:12pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: Things getting out of hand

I don't understand what's happening here. You pay your storage place to do maintenance? They fill your tanks for you? Is this common stuff? My storage lot is literally a parking lot lol. I pay to store my RV there, that's it. Are you allowed to use their water to fill up, or is it only available if you pay them to fill it for you? Yeah, I don't get that part either. I see it's indoor storage but sounds like storage plus valet service. That's what it sounds like to me. Not only are they performing "services" that are normally done by the owner, they are charging truck shop prices to do menial work. The going labor rate at truck shops in our area is $140.00 per hour for mechanical repairs. However they have a schedule for standard maintenance items that is considerably less expensive. Charging $140.00 per hour to fill a water tank or change a water filter is outrageous. Then again if you're not willing or able to do it yourself you can't expect someone else to do it for free. It's time to find a less expensive storage facility/valet service, or spend the money one time to install the needed conveniences at your home. Our drive is about half the length of yours with no turn around option. Every time we bring the motorhome to the house we back it up the drive. To accomplish the tasks you are paying $140.00 an hour for we installed a 30 amp and 50 amp service, and water and sewer connections to the house systems. In our case we hired an electrician to install the outlets, and I tapped into the sewer system in the garage to dump the tanks. Fresh water was available in the garage and at outdoor faucets. It takes about 100' of garden hose to go from the water source in the garage to the motorhome. You can probably have the electrical and plumbing connections installed for $1,000.00 or less. That's a one time expense that would be recovered in a couple years or less if you're utilizing the "valet" service 3 or more times a year.
Hikerdogs 08/29/19 06:41am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Things getting out of hand

I don't understand what's happening here. You pay your storage place to do maintenance? They fill your tanks for you? Is this common stuff? My storage lot is literally a parking lot lol. I pay to store my RV there, that's it. That's what it sounds like to me. Not only are they performing "services" that are normally done by the owner, they are charging truck shop prices to do menial work. The going labor rate at truck shops in our area is $140.00 per hour for mechanical repairs. However they have a schedule for standard maintenance items that is considerably less expensive. Charging $140.00 per hour to fill a water tank or change a water filter is outrageous. Then again if you're not willing or able to do it yourself you can't expect someone else to do it for free. It's time to find a less expensive storage facility/valet service, or spend the money one time to install the needed conveniences at your home. Our drive is about half the length of yours with no turn around option. Every time we bring the motorhome to the house we back it up the drive. To accomplish the tasks you are paying $140.00 an hour for we installed a 30 amp and 50 amp service, and water and sewer connections to the house systems. In our case we hired an electrician to install the outlets, and I tapped into the sewer system in the garage to dump the tanks. Fresh water was available in the garage and at outdoor faucets. It takes about 100' of garden hose to go from the water source in the garage to the motorhome. You can probably have the electrical and plumbing connections installed for $1,000.00 or less. That's a one time expense that would be recovered in a couple years or less if you're utilizing the "valet" service 3 or more times a year.
Hikerdogs 08/29/19 06:39am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Does Your State Require a SBS

Wisconsin like Washington requires supplimental braking on ANYTHING being towed that weighs over 3,000 lbs. Unlike Washington a towed vhhicle can be towed at the posted speed limit just like a trailer. While there is no "law" stating it Ford says the F53 chassis brakes are rated for the GVWR not the GCWR. They also state that ANYTHING being towed that weighs over 1,500 lbs. should have supplimental brakes. So if you're towing a vehicle with a motorhome built on the F53 chassis and the combined weight of the motorhome and towed vehicle exceeds the GVWR, or the towed vehicle itself exceeds 1,500 lbs. you should have a supplimental braking system. The "over 1,500 lb." clause pretty much covers every 4 wheel vehicle built in the last 50 years.
Hikerdogs 08/08/19 06:50pm Dinghy Towing
RE: Non-binding Tow Bar

Regardless of manufacturer claims there are always some conditions that will cause a tow bar to bind. Those conditions might include attempting to disconnect when the toad is at an extreme angle to the motorhome, the toad significantly higher or lower than the motorhome, or at an extreme side to side angle from the motorhome. That being said the non binding bars do a much better job than those that don't have that feature. The non binding feature is simply a difference in the angle that the locking caams lock into the extension rods. The non binding ones have a sloped angle on the cam and a taperd slot in the bars. The standard versions have a more square cut cam and square cut slot in the bars. Our first tow bar was a Roadmater Sterling. It was not a non binding design, but if the toad was relatively in line with the motorhome it would work fine. It was destroyed in an accident and replaced with a Roadmaster Sterling All Terrain, which is a non binding tow bar. This one is slightly more forgiving in that the toad doesn't have to be nearly as well aligned to the motorhome for it to work properly. We used the previous bar for 110,000 miles with no problems. We have about 35,000 miles on the new one, again with no problems.
Hikerdogs 08/03/19 04:00am Dinghy Towing
RE: F-53 Axle vent

Several companies offer a vent tube cap that eliminates the problem of bugs and debris. Both our motorhomes had these caps installed on the vent tube. I assumed they came from Ford, but looking for a Ford part number has so far been unsuccessful. They may have been installed at the Winnebago factory, at their service center in Forest City, or by our local Ford garage. I suspect the latter in that this dealership also sells Jeeps, and the caps are almost identical to those on the vent tubes of our Jeep Wrangler.
Hikerdogs 07/28/19 04:49pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: Winnebago vs Tiffin

Generally in the Itasca they put a better grade of materials and components in it. The Itasca will have standard things that are an option in the same model Winnebago That was true in 2001 when we bought our first Winnebago, but the differences vanished by 2013 when we bought our current motorhome. We visited several dealers trying to decide whether to purchase a Winnebago Adventurer or an Itasca Suncruiser. The Suncruiser listed for about $3,000.00 more than an identically equipped Adventurer. When we asked the sales people why the difference in price we never got any good answers. We emailed Winnebago asking for a list of differences and got back a list of 16 differences between the models. 15 of the 16 differences were badging in that one model would be badged as an Itasca where the other would be badged as a Winnebago. Likewise on would have the Suncruiser nameplate while the other would have an Adventurer nameplate. The only real difference between the two was that the Suncruiser offered 1 interior color scheme that was not offered on the Adventurer. Other than that all the systems, appliances, standard equipment, and options were identical. Still not sure which model to purchase we were able to take a private tour of the production facility and several completed coaches at the factory. We asked our tour guide (a senior training manager) which one would be the best value. His immediate response was the Winnebago Adventurer. He said the quality was equal, the price was slightly lower, the name recognition was better, and the resale value would be higher. One thing we were also alerted to was that (at least at the time) is that any component either standard or optional on any other Winnebago product can be ordered as an option on any other coach as long as it will physically fit in the coach you are ordering. At the time a 6 way power passengers seat and a couple other options were not offered on the Adventurer or Suncruiser models. They were however available on the Journey. We were able to order those options even though they were not listed in any brochure or ordering form. The Itasca nameplate has recently been dropped from the lineup, but models like the Sunstar and Sunova formerly in the Itasca lineup are now offered under the Winnebago nameplate
Hikerdogs 07/21/19 09:24am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Battery corrosion

Many batteries have the vent in the center of the top plate like this: https://www.centennialbatteries.com/centennial-commercial-heavy-duty-battery-c-31-10st-group-31 Unfortunately this is also where the battery hold down bracket is positioned. Our Buick Lucerne had this arrangement, but it also had a tube fitted over the vent that extended below the battery case. I copied this system for our house batteries using clear vinyl tubing. The tube is secured to the vent with a small wire tie. It extends below the battery box and a couple inches below the frame rail. Itis also wire tied to the frame rail. The tubing has been in place 2 years and the hold down bracket and frame rail are still corrosion free.
Hikerdogs 07/01/19 02:18am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Brake controller

To warm this topic up again. Because of health reasons I was not able to install anything. Now i am working on it again. I was able to locate the hidden connector under the dash of my unit, and plugged the controller in, and all lights are on. My problem is, how to find the other connector under the F53 chassis to connect the trailer plug outlet to? Where would I find the connector? Can anybody enlighten me? I have to be able to explain it to my niece, who will crawl for me underneath the motorhome, because I cannot do this anymore. She is 35 and very handy with tools! But I have to tell her what to do. It's possible the wire for the brakes was never run from the original Ford harness to the trailer socket at the rear of the coach. The wire runs along the outside of the drivers side frame rail inside a wire loom to the end of the frame rail supplied by Ford. It's a #10 blue wire. Ford folded back and taped the wires inside the loom. Open the loom at the joint of the Ford supplied frame and the frame extensions added by the body builder. There should be a tag on each of the wires identifying their purpose. The wire for the brakes is clearly marked either "Brakes" or "Trailer Brakes". The body builder extends them from this point to the rear of the coach. That particular wire was not connected on our 2001 Winnebago Adventurer built on the Ford F53 chassis. When I inquired as to why it was never connected I was told that it was done by the dealer only if they were aware that the customer was towing a trailer or dolly that had electric brakes. On our newer (2013) motorhome the wire runs in a loom down the inside of the passengers side frame rail. Winnebago now connects all the wires to the trailer socket.
Hikerdogs 06/19/19 06:50am Dinghy Towing
RE: Onan Emerald Plus 5000

BOTH 120 Breakers are supposed to be ON all the time. When you have 30 amp service and a 5kw Genset, that bottom 20 amp breaker is dedicated to the 2nd AC compressor. When on 30 amp shore power, there is a Energy Management system that monitors the AMP draw on Shore Power and if you have available amps will allow BOTH AC compressors to run. Some Model Motorhomes do not have an EMS system, but do have a switch that allows you to turn on the 2nd compressor as they expect you to manage your AC amperage. This type system is usually more than 15 years or older. On RV's(30 amp) that have 2 roof top AC units, the same applies. The 20 amp breaker is dedicated to the Rear AC unit and usually there will be a Front/Rear AC switch inside the RV to switch between the Front and Rear AC when on Shore Power. Doug If you don't have the owners manual click this link https://winnebagoind.com/resources/manuals/pdfs/Operator2000/00Suncruiser.pdf Thanks all for the responses. This makes a lot more sense now. I'm really angry that Itasca didn't put a 50 amp service in this coach. We do have an EMS system that shed's power and anytime we are on shore power and are running the air it sheds once that 2nd compressor kicks in. I'm excited to flip this switch and see what happens when on generator power. I'm guessing we'll have colder air when it's 90* and humid OR we'll find out that the 2nd compressor is frozen! 30 amp service was the standard until the 2007 model year. 50 amp was available as an extra cost option from about 2000. As I remember the option on our 2001 Adventurer cost around $300.00. Keep in mind at the time your coach was new there were very few RV parks that had 50 amp service. When we ordered our 2001 Adventurer the sales person was a bit surprised we wanted the 50 amp service. He said a recent publication by the industry indicated there were less than 15% of parks with 50 amp service. He also made sure we had a 30 amp adaptor to avoid problems. I'll bet we didn't use the 50 amp service more than half a dozen times in the first 3 years we had the motorhome. It wasn't available most places and was an extra charge in parks that had it. Fast forward another 3 years and the majority of parks had 50 amp service. It was still an extra cost at all but the higher end parks. Now it's standard at almost every RV park and all the state parks in our area.
Hikerdogs 05/20/19 06:12am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Car dollies

Another brand you might explore is Roadmaster. We had their 2000-1 dolly for a few years before towing 4 down. Like other dollies it is heavy, but not difficult to deal with. It has some nice features like attached ramps that lower for loading the car, steerable wheels to keep it inline with the rear wheels on the motorhome, lights, brakes, and storage compartments for the straps. We towed our Buick LeSabre with it for 4 years before purchasing a Jeep Wrangler. We had intended to use the dolly for the Jeep, but reading through the manual we found it could only be towed 4 down or on a trailer. We sold the dolly to a friend who is still using it today. It's almost 20 years old, has nearly 200,000 miles on it, and still works fine.
Hikerdogs 05/11/19 07:44am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Balancing Rear Tires?

On our last motorhome we bought new tires for the rear at about the 40,000 mile mark. They were supposed to be balanced using Equal Balance Beads. As time went on the ride got worse and worse. It was obvious the rear tires were out of balance. It finally got to the point that we stopped at a tire dealer in Florida and aske to have the beads removed , and the tires rebalanced with external weights. When they dismantled the tires they found no balance beads had ever ben installed. The tires now were starting to get flst spots. They rebalanced them with weights, with one tire needing over 12 ozs. The other 3 needed around 8 ozs. each. Even with the tires now balanced the flat spots made the ride terrible. We ended up replacing them with only 30,000 miles on them. We could have probably gotten double the mileage from them had they been balanced when new.
Hikerdogs 05/08/19 09:38am Class A Motorhomes
RE: TST - what am I missing?

OK What am I Missing !!! The price for the system on the camping World site is about a dollar different than the same model on the Amazon site. Both have 6 flow through sensors. The less expensive one at the bottom of the Camping World page only has 4 flow through sensors
Hikerdogs 04/17/19 06:10am Class A Motorhomes
RE: What Should I Consider for a 4WD Tow Vehicle?

I would pick a Jeep, but a little newer. I would go with either the TJ series with the 4.0 six cylinder, or the nweer JK series with the pentastar engine. The TJ is tthe first series with the body nestled inside the rear wheels, making the overall height lower and minimizing roll over possibilities. The CJ's are narrower which may or may not come in handy depending on the type of off roading you intend to do.
Hikerdogs 04/15/19 08:22am Dinghy Towing
RE: Auxiliary Brake System Reviews

We've been using a Roadmaster Brakemaster 9060 to tow our 2004 Jeep Wrangler (tJ) behind our 2013 Winnebago Adventurer 32H. https://www.roadmasterinc.com/products/braking/brakemaster/brake_m.html We used the same system to tow the Jeep behind our 2001 Winnebafo Adventurer 32V. We chose it because it provides proportional braking and the only part to install or remove is an air cylinder in the Jeep. It's been an excellent system for our application. The only downside is the time it takes do do the initial installation. If you have the system professinally installed I would guess it would take between 8 and 10 hours to do both the Jeep and the motorhome. In our case I spent 3 days doing the install. Rather than run the wires along side the existiong wiring harnesses I opened each of them and ran the wires along side the others inside the harnesses. The installation is seamless and there are no exposed wires anywhere in or under the coach or in or under the Jeep.
Hikerdogs 04/15/19 08:12am Class A Motorhomes
RE: The Steering Wheel and spinning the captain's chair

Slide the seat toward the steering wheel. Sounds weird I know but then it spins around the back will be further away from the wheel as it turns. You might tilt the seat back forward a bit also. We use the same procedure to swivel the seat on our 2013 Winnebago Adventurer. 1. Tilt the wheel all the way up 2. lower the left arm rest to the position it will be in when driving. 3. Tilt the seat back all the way forward. 4. Move the seat as far forward as possible. 5. Spin the seat to face the passengers compartment. 6. Move the seat to the farthest back position to allow the seat back to clear the steering wheel when returned to the upright position. 7. Move the seat back to the upright position The arm rest will go under the steering wheel when lowered. If left in the upright position it will bind against the steering wheel.
Hikerdogs 03/23/19 08:41am Class A Motorhomes
Food Trucks in Alaska and Yukon

This topic has been moved to another forum. You can read it here: 29847581
Hikerdogs 02/25/19 08:07am RV Parks, Campgrounds and Attractions
Food Trucks in Alaska and Yukon

We will be driving from Wisconsin to Alaska this summer and we enjoy stopping for lunch at local food trucks. When we went to Alaska in 2013, I recall having terrific meals at Seafood Express in Hyder and Compadres Burritos in Whitehorse. Can you recommend other food trucks or buses in Alaska or along the Alaska Hwy? Thanks. Tracy
Hikerdogs 02/25/19 08:07am RVing in Canada and Alaska
Sort by:    Search within results:


New posts No new posts
Closed, new posts Closed, no new posts
Moved, new posts Moved, no new posts

Adjust text size:




© 2020 CWI, Inc. © 2020 Good Sam Enterprises, LLC. All Rights Reserved.