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 > Your search for posts made by 'JALLEN4' found 15 matches.

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RE: Sales Hints

For them to drive it (even with you in the vehicle) make a copy (or picture) of their driver's license and their proof of insurance, because if something happened while your prospective buyer was driving it, you want HIS insurance to be primary, not yours. I'm not an insurance agent, but I think as long as it's your vehicle and the other driver is driving it with your permission, your insurance is going to be primary. I cannot see how photographing an insurance card of the driver's for some other vehicle isn't going to matter one bit in the case of a crash; and as a buyer I'd be very put-off if the seller required me to provide them with a binder for a vehicle I hadn't even committed to purchasing or even made an offer on yet. I haven't read the policy recently, but I think I remember my own car insurance only covers me in another vehicle to the extent that no other policy would be applicable. If I were test driving your RV and you had no insurance, it would appear to cover me in that situation; but if you had insurance, it would not cover whatever your insurance does cover. Nope, his will be. Been there -- done that. Yes, having a copy not only assures you he has both a DL and insurance, but contains information you might need in the unlikely event something happened. Again, been there -- done that. And who said anything about a binder? If you're calling the DL/insurance card thing a binder, you've obviously not test driven anything at a dealership recently. (They won't ask you for an insurance card necessarily, but they WILL ask you to produce a DL, and yes, they'll make a copy of it). Dealerships ask for a license and copy it because they number one want to make sure it is a licensed driver operating their vehicle and as a theft prevention in case it all goes upside down. One would be surprised how often a theft takes place on a "test drive". It does not transfer primary responsibility to the consumer. As a dealer, you cannot void your ownership and potential liability. This is why you buy Garage Owners Liability for a huge yearly premium. When we speak of "Been there...Done that" my opinion comes from four decades of owning/operating multiple new car dealerships, working with attorneys to set demo policies, and purchasing insurance yearly for all of the above. I appreciate your input based on your history in the business. I, too, spent a while in the automobile business ... right at 30 years to be exact (Real Estate overlapping in the final years of it). I managed a multi-line highline dealership for a number of years before starting my own dealership with my son. So, I know how it works. I've worked with attorneys, set policies, bought plenty of (usually overpriced) insurance, and had my share of experiences with customers damaging cars, and even one theft (only one thank goodness). So I'm not speaking off the cuff, but rather as a result of real life experience. We sold the dealership including all the real estate in 2013. Simply Google "primary insurance carrier on dealership test drive". The results are not ambivalent. Or, you can call NADA Legal, if still a member, and they will be happy to address the issue.
JALLEN4 08/17/20 05:50am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Sales Hints

For them to drive it (even with you in the vehicle) make a copy (or picture) of their driver's license and their proof of insurance, because if something happened while your prospective buyer was driving it, you want HIS insurance to be primary, not yours. I'm not an insurance agent, but I think as long as it's your vehicle and the other driver is driving it with your permission, your insurance is going to be primary. I cannot see how photographing an insurance card of the driver's for some other vehicle isn't going to matter one bit in the case of a crash; and as a buyer I'd be very put-off if the seller required me to provide them with a binder for a vehicle I hadn't even committed to purchasing or even made an offer on yet. I haven't read the policy recently, but I think I remember my own car insurance only covers me in another vehicle to the extent that no other policy would be applicable. If I were test driving your RV and you had no insurance, it would appear to cover me in that situation; but if you had insurance, it would not cover whatever your insurance does cover. Nope, his will be. Been there -- done that. Yes, having a copy not only assures you he has both a DL and insurance, but contains information you might need in the unlikely event something happened. Again, been there -- done that. And who said anything about a binder? If you're calling the DL/insurance card thing a binder, you've obviously not test driven anything at a dealership recently. (They won't ask you for an insurance card necessarily, but they WILL ask you to produce a DL, and yes, they'll make a copy of it). Dealerships ask for a license and copy it because they number one want to make sure it is a licensed driver operating their vehicle and as a theft prevention in case it all goes upside down. One would be surprised how often a theft takes place on a "test drive". It does not transfer primary responsibility to the consumer. As a dealer, you cannot void your ownership and potential liability. This is why you buy Garage Owners Liability for a huge yearly premium. When we speak of "Been there...Done that" my opinion comes from four decades of owning/operating multiple new car dealerships, working with attorneys to set demo policies, and purchasing insurance yearly for all of the above.
JALLEN4 08/16/20 05:32am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Sales Hints

A lot depends on if you own your RV free and clear and have the title in hand or if the bank is holding your title because of a loan. If the bank holds the title, check with them to see the procedure that they use. Some banks/States use electronic titles and as soon as the lein is paid, they will release the title ELECTRONICALLY so that you and the buyer can go to the DMV and get a printed title. If the buyer is going to finance the purchase and you also have a loan on the RV, the two banks will have to get together to figure out how they want to deal with things. If you own the RV free and clear and the buyer is paying cash then I found the best way is for them to wire transfer the funds to you before you sign over the title. Depending on the seller's bank, he may have to make arrangements to wire transfer the funds BEFORE he comes to see you. Most banks will not authorize a wire transfer over the phone unless prior arrangements have been made. Once the wire transfer is complete, then you can sign over the title. Naturally you may find a buyer that wants to pay cash. One of my Classic Cars sold for over $50,000 and the buyer insisted on paying cash. No big deal but we had to go to my bank where they counted the money with two tellers and then deposited it in to my cash. My bank knew me and this DID NOT involve any additional paperwork and red flags to the FEDS even tho it was a cash deposit in excess of $10,000. If your bank is not familiar with you, depositing that much cash may be an issue and require additional paperwork. I do not ever recommend accepting a cashier's check. These can be forged and a stop payment can be issued on the check by the buyer. As far as removing you from liability all you have to do is type up a Bill of Sale outlining the entire transaction and when you hand over the title, both of you sign the Bill of Sale and you are out of it, according to my attorney. Using a Notary at your bank insures that each party is who they say they are. In my last sale, the buyer lived in my State and at closing we BOTH went down to the DMV and the title was transferred right there. Since Florida uses electronic titles, he received a new title with his name on it and a new tag as soon as he paid the sales tax and the license fee. Took about 15 minutes and he had a new tag and title and was ready to drive home. Really all it takes is a little common sense but if there is any doubt, go to your bank and get their advice. You want to avoid trying to close a deal on the weekend where your financial institution and the DMV are closed. This could be a red flag if the buyer insists on closing a weekend deal with a cashier's check. If it is a cash deal on the weekend, use your own discretion but he can still sign a Bill of Sale and there are places, like car dealers, that do have a Notary and are open on the weekends. You offer some excellent advice. I would though take exception to your attorney's opinion about potential liability before title transfer but after signing a bill-of-sale. Most attorneys, not in the automotive practice realm, would answer that way and will proceed under that premise in court. As a retired new car dealer, I have been down that road and have seen it played out as well as being warned by our various trade Associations. Be careful and do not rush to cancel coverage on a sold unit for the sake of a couple bucks.
JALLEN4 08/15/20 01:37pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: Sales Hints

The true way to assure valid funds is a wire transfer to your account. Checks of all types can be forged and cash can be counterfeit. Many states are starting to require all real estate transactions through title companies be conducted with wire transfers of funds. There is a questionable period in all transactions where the title has been given to a new owner but not yet transferred. Dealers have the same problem and their insurance takes this period into account. Do not cancel your insurance coverage until you feel confident title has been transferred. A common mistake is for the owner to allow the purchaser to drive the unit home on his tags. NEVER do that! Temporary tags for this purpose are available from the State in every state. Making the actual "closing" in the environment of a bank or credit union is a very wise move. There have been many a mistake and unfortunate happenings with vehicle transactions not conducted in a safe public place with knowledgeable assistance available.
JALLEN4 08/15/20 07:03am Class A Motorhomes
RE: MOTORHOME sales questions.

I sold tens of thousands of motorized vehicles over a four decade plus career and can give you some basic pointers where amateurs most often make mistakes. 1. Clean it spotlessly and keep it that way until it sells. 2. Make all needed and obvious repairs. Don't assume the buyer will allow in the price to fix it himself. Fix the scratches, dents missing parts. Replace the tires if totally worn out and not just offer an "allowance". Let there be no excuses for the buyer not to buy! 3. Remove all personal items and added decorations that are not affixed. The buyer will not necessarily like what you thought was beautiful! 4. By all means look up NADA low wholesale and low retail values and know what they realistically are. 5. Search continuously on-line for "comparative product" prices even if a competing manufacturer. You are in competition with all of them....not just your model! 6. Call every major RV store in a 300 mile radius and solicit a "buy" offer. Most will give you one, some low and some pretty accurate. This will give you a reality check as to what "range" you are in and keep in mind dealers are normally NOT making ten thousand dollars re-selling what they buy from the public. 7. Prepare to put up with a lot of B.S from the tire-kicking public and various scam artists. It can be a challenge but you can win. Good luck!
JALLEN4 08/12/20 06:56am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Big truck dealer in Idaho?

Always remember this, the best deals are always where you are not! If you live in the South, always go North. Same goes for East or West. The myth will always go on!
JALLEN4 07/19/20 06:38am Tow Vehicles
RE: HOA says NO to temp RV for Dr.

The thing most seem to ignore here is that the DR. denied is in fact the HOA! When you move into an HOA, a completely volunteer action, you become a member of and the HOA. If you decide to not participate in the actions of that body and ignore your responsibilities, you suffer whatever actions the other members wish to take. Too many with no understanding tend to think of the HOA as a monolithic entity impervious to the wants of the whole. It is not. It is neighbors banding together for the common good. The rules are all subject to change and designed to reflect the majority desires. Those who move into an HOA and choose to not participate are going to get exactly what they chose. Rules made for other's desires and not necessarily ones they agree with.
JALLEN4 04/21/20 06:10am General RVing Issues
RE: Am I being greedy?

I spent my career for many decades as a new car dealer. What you are describing is ridiculous unless it is a part of the written agreement involving the transaction. If not, and you have already taken delivery of the new unit and given the dealer the trade...you are done. You owe him nothing after the fact! He is the dealer and the expert here. It is his responsibility to inspect the trade and to evaluate it before the transaction is consummated. It was not something that was hidden and was in clear sight. If your responsibility was listed in the buyers agreement originally, it is a whole different story and both parties made a clear mistake. The time for an agreement is before the papers are signed.
JALLEN4 03/09/20 06:09am General RVing Issues
RE: dealer advertising

Of course it is a good starting point. That is exactly why dealers put the information in the ad. While paying cash for the RV is a wonderful thing, most people will never own one if that is the way they have to buy it. It is surprising for all vehicle sales how many people show up to look at them without a clue as to what the payments will be. Having a good idea of what you can afford under what terms before you arrive at the dealership will help you stay on point and keep from falling in love with more RV than you can really afford and making a huge mistake. The key is to know your limitations, do your research, and setting your parameters before starting to look. I have watched far too many people get carried away and decide it is only another $100 a month more to get exactly what we want. Often that $100 is the difference between practicality and falling into the deep end. Decide what you can comfortably spend in cash and payments before you go and stick to it.
JALLEN4 02/15/20 05:23am Class A Motorhomes
RE: How much do dealers pay for the RV's they sell

As a retired new car dealer, I can assure you that it would be extremely rare for some part-time dealership gopher to actually have a clue as to what the dealer is paying for product. He might well think he does. I can assure you very few people working for me did and none of them were part-time lot boys.
JALLEN4 02/02/20 06:02am General RVing Issues
RE: Camping World Get Best Price button

I think it would be rather naive to think any dealer is going to post on their website the very best price they are going to sell any unit. Factually, they most times do not really know themselves. I can't tell you how many times I have said "This is the lowest price I am going to take"...not one penny less...and meant it. Then, only to be made a real offer by a real customer with real money.
JALLEN4 01/23/20 05:29am Camping World RV Sales
RE: Truck warranty

The dealer making the warranty repair is subject to audit on his warranty repairs and can be charged back for his submission. If you are taking a new truck to a dealer other than the selling dealer immediately after purchase, it is not hard to understand that dealer's hesitancy. If the manufacturer calls for the replaced part and determines in their opinion it is not warranty, the dealer will eat the part and the labor. You did not buy it there and that dealer would be prudent to make sure they are going to get paid.
JALLEN4 01/05/20 04:45am Tow Vehicles
RE: Sticker shock

I gladly take my F150 to the local Ford dealership. They properly service my truck and get it back to me when promised. They are not the cheapest here in town, but, I had problems with a couple of other shops getting the work done. One other shop had one of my vehicles for 3 weeks because they kept doing other jobs while my truck sat on the lift. The Ford shop gets my work done and the vehicle back to me asap. They beat all of the other tires shops when I needed new tires. Great service. Stick with that dealer then. They have obviously earned your business. All the dealers I've dealt with the past 30 years sucked big time and would never use them for any repair other than warranty work You truly need to think about what you are saying. If, over a 30 year period of time, you have never received proper treatment from a dealer's shop...you might want to reconsider where the problem actually is. Perhaps he actually checks the work and is in touch with reality. My last dealer visit resulted in a damaged hub cap and a brake hose pulled tight across the coil spring. I have had bad and dangerous worked performed by dealers and other shops since I started driving many decades ago. But go ahead and always blame the victim. Nobody is "blaming the victim" but that is a good attempt to shift the conversation. It is just ridiculous to state that over a 30 year period of time no dealer ever did anything other than poor work. There are millions of satisfactory reviews of shops on the internet including on this forum. Sounds good though to those who want to think everyone is taking advantage of them always!
JALLEN4 11/11/19 05:13am Tow Vehicles
RE: Sticker shock

I gladly take my F150 to the local Ford dealership. They properly service my truck and get it back to me when promised. They are not the cheapest here in town, but, I had problems with a couple of other shops getting the work done. One other shop had one of my vehicles for 3 weeks because they kept doing other jobs while my truck sat on the lift. The Ford shop gets my work done and the vehicle back to me asap. They beat all of the other tires shops when I needed new tires. Great service. Stick with that dealer then. They have obviously earned your business. All the dealers I've dealt with the past 30 years sucked big time and would never use them for any repair other than warranty work You truly need to think about what you are saying. If, over a 30 year period of time, you have never received proper treatment from a dealer's shop...you might want to reconsider where the problem actually is.
JALLEN4 11/10/19 05:50am Tow Vehicles
RE: Sticker shock

Here is an idea. Why don't you guys who obviously know everything about how these service shops should be run, start your own. You will obviously be rich nearly overnight and us dummies will never have to wait to make an appointment again while we enjoy your cheap prices!:R
JALLEN4 11/09/19 05:46am Tow Vehicles
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