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RE: Fridge project for the fall

Absorption refrigeration was in use before electricity was widespread for fans. If the area is shaped right, so the normal lift of the warmer air can keep it flowing there is not much need for fans. I have a computer fan on mine. I have thought of putting a thermo-activated switch on it, but about the only time I turn it on is if it will be over 100, and I will be away from camper, can't watch the temp. At about 85 outside, if the fan is on, my eggs freeze.Is your fridge vented through the roof? No, mine is vented thru the wall. But I have a self-made baffle that slopes from top of coils to the top of vent. As the heated air lifts it is forced to the opening.
JRscooby 09/23/21 08:28am General RVing Issues
RE: Fridge project for the fall

Absorption refrigeration was in use before electricity was widespread for fans. If the area is shaped right, so the normal lift of the warmer air can keep it flowing there is not much need for fans. I have a computer fan on mine. I have thought of putting a thermo-activated switch on it, but about the only time I turn it on is if it will be over 100, and I will be away from camper, can't watch the temp. At about 85 outside, if the fan is on, my eggs freeze.
JRscooby 09/22/21 06:57am General RVing Issues
RE: Fridge project for the fall

Don't stuff it with food. Use a small circulation fan inside. My Dometic is in a slide, no fans, and works great. As long as what you put in there is cold going in, not much of a issue in my experience. A fan helps, but the taper of, and shape where the lids force gaps for air flow. When I spent a month in 100+ weather I figured out just how many and what size of the square/rectangle shaped containers would fit. When I took a full 1 out I would replace with MT. With most of the cold air contained, and knowing which I wanted when opened so closed quick temp recovered much quicker. During really hot weather I've seen folks remove the back cover and place a house fan blowing at the coils. Big air flow is not as good as forcing the air to flow thru the right places. Some RV fridges don't work very well not matter what you do. Others are much better. Maybe you just have one of the bad ones. I don't like to post brand names on this forum though. The technology of a absorption fridge is pretty simple. A little bit of work with the insulation and air flow can overcome the label.
JRscooby 09/22/21 04:50am General RVing Issues
RE: Saw a unicorn F-150 on the road yesterday!

You must remember a dollar is not worth much anymore.I brought my first F150 in 76 300 6 banger 3 speed on the column with AM radio for $3,300 plus tax. LOL. End of Feb '05 I bought a regular cab short bed V6 Dodge. End of Aug, bought wife a new Neon. The 2 of them together was under $25,000.
JRscooby 09/19/21 01:59pm General RVing Issues
RE: Can I Use Gear Oil On Dual Cam

I don't know why anybody would even think of using anything that smells as rear-end grease if anything else would work.
JRscooby 09/18/21 06:48am Travel Trailers
RE: cleaning 7-pin receiver connector on truck

I'm not much smarter than a box of rocks, but have used Dielectric grease on hundreds of light cords for millions of miles for decades. And sense I started, the only issue I have had is careless handling. Start with tight, clean connections. A little of the grease about every 10-20 unhooks. I assume that like any grease, it will keep moisture, therefore corrosion off the contacts. And because it is non-conductive, I do not need to worry about it causing short circuits. In the case that is "working" for you, basically you are depending on the contact springs to be strong enough to displace enough of the dielectric grease from the contact surface to make a electrical connection. Sometimes works, sometimes doesn't. The metal to metal contact is all that will carry the current, even if nothing is used. And the odds the friction of connecting will scrape off the grease is much higher than it will remove enough of any corrosion Whatever contact is being made is compromised electrically and adding needless resistance to the equation. Any corrosion will also compromise the contact. And it will also reduce the spring pressure. Cleaning likely will restore contact, but every time a abrasive is used, there is less metal, weaker contact. The proper tool is two of the greases I mentioned (Oxgard or No-Alox) and you just apply that to the contact surfaces only, it will not run or creep and it is specifically made for doing the exact thing you want which is to keep moisture away from the contact surfaces. There is 2 things that can go wrong when you plug in the light cord. Bad contact, and just as bad if not worse, contact between the conductors, or a short. When mine is covered with dielectric grease, I plug in, the contacts slide on each other, the grease will stack up in bottom of socket. I would be willing to bet the magic you recommend will do the same thing. But, and to me a big but, the dielectric, being non-conductive, will not cause a short. I would add that your recommendation would likely reduce problems in something like a crimp connection, where the fit tightens after the wire is in place.
JRscooby 09/17/21 03:58pm General RVing Issues
RE: Black Eye

I said all trucks and I am sure that "most" are not paid by the mile. What we are talking about here are not the ones that are going "as fast as legally possible ". We are talking about the speeders tailgaters intimidators. If your not in this category then why are you supporting their action? If you are in that category how are you going to feel when you kill a family? I spent my life in trucks, and would be willing to bet most are paid for performance, and a very large percentage of them it is by book miles. Others, paid a flat rate for haul, extra time does not pay extra. Also there is the fact that often times somebody that rides a desk sets up load/unload times. Then there is the E-logs. When I retired if I was behind slow traffic for 20 miles, the rounding error could CYA.
JRscooby 09/17/21 02:58pm General RVing Issues
RE: Black Eye

Based on responses from this thread, we can see why there is no firm pull over, don't impede traffic rule. It seems we all have a different approach / standard as to what s acceptable when it comes to a line of traffic behind you. The issue is if I'm traveling a road I don't know, how do I know where it is safe to pull off? Remember, I will also need to get back in traffic lane, and for some time I will be moving even slower. Most places I drive there are places where it is safe to step to left, and step out to pass a slower vehicle. IMHO, somebody driving a speed they are comfortable, even if well below the limit, is not the obstruction. The obstruction is the rectum that pulls up behind, and rides there without using the opportunity to pass. Don't need to "tailgate", just don't allow room for somebody to pass you, and safely to slow back to speed of lead vehicle. It takes a running auto to pass 2 at a time.
JRscooby 09/17/21 08:13am General RVing Issues
RE: cleaning 7-pin receiver connector on truck

Dielectric grease has been the best fix, but not always. NO, wrong application for dielectric grease. Dielectric grease is a Silicone grease made of liquid Silicon and a thickener. Silicon IS a NON-CONDUCTIVE ELECTRICAL INSULATOR.. See HERE Highlights from website link.. "Dielectric grease assists in preventing arcing between electrical parts. Dielectric grease is also known as tune-up grease. It is a silicone-based and non-conductive type of grease to protect electrical connectors from corrosion, moisture, and dirt. It disrupts electric currents’ flow, thus making it ideal for sealing and lubricating rubber parts of electric connectors. Ensure that the grease does not touch the path of electrical currents or where parts are connecting. This is because the grease is an insulator, and it disrupts the flow of currents. Therefore, it is recommended to use dielectric grease on surfaces of electrical parts where the currents are not passing. When using dielectric grease for an automotive tune-up on a diesel or gasoline engine, start by applying a little grease at the end of a spark plug wire’s rubber boot and spread it only to cover the inside lip. This prevents high voltage electricity from flowing to the boot and leaking from the engine block. It also makes it less difficult to put the boot over the ceramic insulator. It creates a watertight seal around the spark plug, protecting the connection from dirt and water. The other great use of dielectric grease is on gaskets of multi-pin connectors or rubber mating surfaces in the truck and automotive engines. In this application, it acts as a sealant and lubricant of the connector’s non-conductive mating surfaces. However, it is not advisable to use the grease on the connector’s actual electrical conductive contacts. Cons of Dielectric Grease Although dielectric grease is beneficial, it can also be detrimental when applied incorrectly. The grease is non-conductive; thus, when used incorrectly, it can prevent current flow. If you fail to clean the conductor’s contact points after applying the dielectric grease, the current will not pass through. " There is special grease made specifically for electrical contacts, it is sold as OxGard or No-Alox which are designed to prevent corrosion from moisture. Those types of grease you only apply to the contact surfaces as it does allow for electrical conduction but seals moisture which causes corrosion of the contacts away from the contact surfaces. These greases were developed to help allow Aluminum to copper wiring interfaces to coexist.. BUT, to make this work properly, the contacts surfaces must be 100% corrosion free which means you must use some elbow grease, muscle and sandpaper to shine the contact surfaces clean of any corrosion. I'm not much smarter than a box of rocks, but have used Dielectric grease on hundreds of light cords for millions of miles for decades. And sense I started, the only issue I have had is careless handling. Start with tight, clean connections. A little of the grease about every 10-20 unhooks. I assume that like any grease, it will keep moisture, therefore corrosion off the contacts. And because it is non-conductive, I do not need to worry about it causing short circuits.
JRscooby 09/16/21 03:46pm General RVing Issues
RE: Fridge project for the fall

First step is look at air flow from the lower area to upper, on the working side. Make sure there is no path except thru the fins, or the burner stack. Best if you have a baffle that slopes up from top of the vent opening to the fins, so air will flow up to replace the air that is heated by fins. Then go to top. You need to install baffle so the heated air from stack or fins can go no place except outside. And should all slope so there is no place for the air to pool. While you are at it, extra insulation between the cold part of fridge and outside wall will help.
JRscooby 09/16/21 04:35am General RVing Issues
RE: Ruined manual transmissions

Why do I keep getting all the “Karen’s” commenting when I specifically asked a reasonable question?! I had to get a moderator involved the last time I posted. Just exactly what "Karen's" comments are putting your panties in a bunch? Fact is most manual transmissions do not lube themselves as well when the input shaft is not spinning. It might be the height of input/output shaft, but most I have looked at those 2 have the same centerline. As a trumpism, I would say it has to do with the angle of gears, do they shove lube towards the bearings or away. I think you will find few who tow when the manufacture says don't, because we trust some science
JRscooby 09/15/21 02:47pm Dinghy Towing
RE: cleaning 7-pin receiver connector on truck

When was the last time you cleaned your battery terminals? Disconnect batteries, brush trailer outlet, blow out any shed bristles, spray with dielectric, clean and re-connect battery.
JRscooby 09/15/21 10:43am General RVing Issues
RE: Hmm... another use for Tork-Lift?

Not surprising any subject brings lot of speculation. "Wide load" signs are not legal in lot of states, so generally the "oversize load" should apply here. When the racks sticks about 1 foot past bumper, making it about 9 ft wide, it is about the width of side mirrors, so maybe the law of small brackets sticking past 102" legal width apply? That load sure calls for center support, flags and holding chains, but seeing the truck on center lane, doesn't look like driver is concern. Brackets stick out about a foot on one side makes it 9 feet wide? Side mirrors in normal position are less than 102. And if less than 102, the width is no reason for flags and signs.
JRscooby 09/15/21 10:36am Truck Campers
RE: Hmm... another use for Tork-Lift?

I worked for a rebar fabricator and hauled quite a few loads of rebar. I know how to secure various sizes of rebar and I would have been fired, and rightfully so, if I hauled rebar like that. It’s flat out dangerous. Yes, this should not be the way to haul rebar. And when my skateboard had a headboard mounted to the front of it. Most pros pulling a flatbed have their protection mounted tractor frame behind cab instead. This means in a sudden stop, if the load shifts it has at least 5 feet to be moving faster than the driver when it hits the rack. I'm not saying this is a good/safe way to haul. What I'm saying is if you are going to be upset about this unusual method, you maybe should take issue with the tons of bar and pipe that moves out to small jobs on roof racks and such. Better that load does not get loose, but if it does the launch from low like that is much less likely to do real harm.
JRscooby 09/15/21 08:45am Truck Campers
RE: Hmm... another use for Tork-Lift?

Looks like it needs a “Wide Load” sign to me. :):) Not unless eight and half feet. It’s at least that. The trucks bumper is 6’ wide, and my calibrated eyeballs say that’s more than 15” to the end of the extensions. Looks more like 18”, but just for reference license plates are all 12” wide. Compare that to what’s sticking out past the ends of the bumper. Maybe he knows the width limit, and it’s 1/4” under. :W :):) Well no state would issue a permit for that load. And my experience has taught me that few LEOs will notice somebody is a little over without a sign. Sign would cause more problems than solves. Going off in weeds for a little humor. A company in KC, who's main job is cranes. All their tractors have blanket permits, so a load up to 10 feet wide does not require special calls to state. Some of the booms, they had issues with the cribbing failing because needed to stick out past the side of trailer so far. Management had the shop build some trailers 10 foot wide, to reduce this problem. As long as there is a load over 8.5 feet wide on the trailer, works great. But normally when the big cranes go out, the trucks make a few trips with boom sections. A MT trailer on the ground is not a load. But 2 of them stacked on a 102 can cross the scales.
JRscooby 09/15/21 06:53am Truck Campers
RE: Hmm... another use for Tork-Lift?

Are you kidding, that truck gets into an accident and those rebar become flying projectiles. Yeah, your right whats the real danger?:S While this statement is true, IMHO, it is made by somebody that does not pay a lot of attention to the way things are normally done. Sure, pickup hits something, that rebar keeps moving. But it will be hitting the ground probably before the back is clear of front rack. Most likely any damage done will be to tires or feet/ankles. Not Good. Now let's look at the same impact, same bundle of bar, loaded in the normal manner, a rack over bed and cab. The bar is launched at at the same speed, but starting at over 6 feet in the air. With the same drop rate it can skip off the roof of the car the truck hit, off the deck lid of the car stopped in front, and into that car's passenger compartment. But it must go much farther before it hits anybody in the ankles. I think even worse. Looks like it needs a “Wide Load” sign to me. :):) Not unless eight and half feet.
JRscooby 09/15/21 04:42am Truck Campers
RE: Work-anywhere towing assistance?

There is simply nothing wrong with driving one armed and or one eyed. For that matter you can be totally deaf. Bell, many always get in head first to drive. By that I mean put head in seat, climb in, wiggle around until firmly between the cheeks, start engine.
JRscooby 09/14/21 03:58pm General RVing Issues
RE: Hmm... another use for Tork-Lift?

Yeah, that looks REAL safe! What is the real danger, compared to what most small contractors do? If it was me, I would probably put a strap in center to reduce sag, but not likely to cause harm.
JRscooby 09/14/21 03:54pm Truck Campers
RE: Ruined manual transmissions

Not RV, but back in '70s, when driving a tow truck there where some that we would only pull as far as the shoulder before we pulled axle or driveshaft. I towed my old "3 on the tree" Ford for about 300 miles 4 down. After that it made noise in 2nd gear. I know several guys that would tow their VW based dune buggies. 3 of them towed about 500 miles in convoy. 1 would not shift when got home.
JRscooby 09/14/21 01:42pm Dinghy Towing
RE: Broke my hitch pin today

Just weld the adapter to the stinger and be done with it. It will still have a lot of slop and play in it. How would there be more play than just the normal looseness of a ballmount in receiver?
JRscooby 09/14/21 08:15am Towing
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