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 > Your search for posts made by 'KD4UPL' found 259 matches.

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RE: 2012 F-150 tow rating

..There are many different kinds of trailers: flat bed, dump, horse, cargo, boat, equipment, cattle, and RV. They all have their differences. A hard sided RV trailer is by far the most challenging. They have a huge frontal area, a high percentage of tongue weight, a large side "sail" area to catch wind, and very limited ability to adjust the weight balance. The same truck that might pull an 8,000 pound boat very well might be a struggling hand full with a 6,000 pound RV.lo So, yes, your truck can pull 11,500 pounds. If that's a flatbed load of bricks or a dump trailer load of gravel you're probably fine. If you're talking about a hard sided RV I wouldn't even want to tow 9,000 pounds with a 1500 series truck.You apprently aren't familiar with the SAE J2807 standard, which is how truck ratings are established, or you would never had made such a ridiculous statement. None of my statements are ridiculous. Their are multiple types of trailers, they do have different physical characteristics and quirks, they do tow differently. Wind resistance and tongue weight are absolutely factors that must be considered in how suitable a tow vehicle is. Are you suggesting that a trailer that vastly overloads the rear axle, tires, and hitch is just fine as long as it weighs no more than the "tow rating" of the vehicle?
KD4UPL 11/25/20 05:53pm Tow Vehicles
RE: 2012 F-150 tow rating

The truck's tow rating is correct but it's not that simple. You have to use your head and figure out the other ratings like payload and axle weights. There are many different kinds of trailers: flat bed, dump, horse, cargo, boat, equipment, cattle, and RV. They all have their differences. A hard sided RV trailer is by far the most challenging. They have a huge frontal area, a high percentage of tongue weight, a large side "sail" area to catch wind, and very limited ability to adjust the weight balance. The same truck that might pull an 8,000 pound boat very well might be a struggling hand full with a 6,000 pound RV. So, yes, your truck can pull 11,500 pounds. If that's a flatbed load of bricks or a dump trailer load of gravel you're probably fine. If you're talking about a hard sided RV I wouldn't even want to tow 9,000 pounds with a 1500 series truck.
KD4UPL 11/22/20 04:52pm Tow Vehicles
RE: What's a good battery level monitor?

The Trimetric TM-2030-RV is a nice, simple battery meter that has been around for decades. It's not fancy but it does the job. If you ever plan to expand your system to include an inverter charger you could get a Magnum inverter and use their matching ME-BMK. The Victron unit listed looks nice but I have no experience with that one.
KD4UPL 11/17/20 05:53pm Tech Issues
RE: Generator Timer Click, click how to change

Considering no body know what generator we're talking about it's hard to make a good recommendation. However, it is almost assuredly not 120v. Most Onan and other quality generators use a 12v meter. Many portable types wrap the spark plug wire as bgum mentions.
KD4UPL 11/15/20 07:29am Tech Issues
RE: 1997 Fleetwood Caribou 12 ft

That camper belongs on a dually only. My 2003 Fleetwood 11X was nearly 12' long. It weighed a bit over 4,000 pounds loaded for a trip. I had my family of five with me in the Chevy dually truck. We tipped the scales at about 13,000 pounds. Unless you pack incredibly light and take no passengers I wouldn't even entertain putting that on a F250.
KD4UPL 11/15/20 07:27am Truck Campers
RE: Generator use during travel

I agree, just run the furnace. I know someone who tried to run a portable generator in motion on the rear of a bus. It wouldn't. It ran fine stationary, not moving. It could have been the oil sloshing away from the low oil sensor. It could have been the vacuum at the back of the bus deprived it of air. Who knows.
KD4UPL 11/15/20 07:23am Travel Trailers
RE: 1988 coachmen truck camper

I can't imagine it's much less than 3,000 pounds dry weight. Might be as low as 2,500 depending on a lot of factors. Personally, I wouldn't be interested in any camper that old regardless of the price. Unless it's been garage kept it's entire life there is likely a lot of rot hiding everywhere. The odds that it's been carefully maintained and had all the seams kept totally watertight for over 30 years are slim to none. I looked those campers up on NADA for you. They list for about $1,000 average retail.
KD4UPL 11/15/20 07:20am Truck Campers
RE: marker lights to led marker lights

Yes, just swap the fixtures. However, you may need to change the signal light flasher in your tow vehicle. Some of the older vehicles have flashers that flash very rapidly (like a strobe light almost) when used with LEDs. These are readily available and it's usually a simple un-plug, plug-in swap.
KD4UPL 11/14/20 01:44pm Travel Trailers
RE: house batteries and generator

If your going to drive it every 2 weeks and run the generator once a month why would you want to go to the trouble of removing the house batteries? If you leave them disconnected when the RV is no in use they should stay plenty charged up for the 2 weeks the RV is not driven.
KD4UPL 11/08/20 05:03pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Tranny overheated

Well, the basics are: Did you have enough fluid in it? Do you service your transmission regularly including fluid and filter? Do you have a transmission temperature gauge? What was it reading? It could be a computer glitch, could be a trans problem, could be an actual overheat due to outside circumstances.
KD4UPL 11/08/20 05:01pm Towing
RE: DECA AGM Batteries

I assume you mean Deka (with a K). I install off grid solar systems for a living. I have installed hundreds batteries, both flooded and AGM, over the last 15 years. I've had very good results with them or I wouldn't keep using them. I typically see their AGM batteries lasting 7 to 10 years before needing replacement. I do think that Lifeline batteries are a little better but they are also more expensive. However, they make a wider variety of sizes so I often go with Lifeline if a different size works better for a given installation. A quick googls search shows the Deka 8AGC2 selling online anywhere from $260 to $360 with most places about $300. What is CW charging?
KD4UPL 11/07/20 06:21am Tech Issues
RE: Recommendation needed for first camper trailer

I really thought the diesel Colorado had a higher tow rating than that. Keep in mind their are many kinds of trailers and a hard sided travel trailer is by far the most difficult to tow. A truck that may be well suited to tow a 5,000 pound boat may be a struggling handful with a 4,000 pound travel trailer. The dry weight of a trailer doesn't include water, propane, or a battery. You then have to add all of your food and gear. If your tow rating really is 5,000 and the trailer really is 4,000 pounds dry then I would say you have too much trailer for that truck.
KD4UPL 11/04/20 06:53pm Travel Trailers
RE: truck camper and towing a flat trailer advice

If you don't have a dually I wouldn't try the "biggest one". Even a dually of 2001 vintage would be grossly overloaded by the largest truck campers. Some of the large triple slide units weigh around 5,000 pounds EMPTY. You can expect between 6,000 and 7,000 pounds when fully loaded with water, propane, batteries, food, clothing, etc. Many people that get these large campers use a 4500 or 5500 series truck with a custom flatbed to haul them. As for length, you will need a Super Hitch and Super Truss extension, both made by Torklift. The 48" extension should be long enough to tow behind most any length camper out there. I used one behind my 11' camper to tow my 4,500 pound boat or utility trailer. The hitch extension is rated for 12,000 pounds of trailer weight but you have to use a weigh distributing hitch above 6,000 pounds which you would likely be with a 4 runner on a flatbed. Lance, Eagle Cap, Host, and Arctic Fox are likely the brands you want to be looking at if you want a big camper. If you've got a SRW truck and want to tow a 4runner I would advise not going larger than a 9' or 10' camper. But really, weight is the question. You need to weigh your truck empty and pay attention to your rear axle weight. Subtract that from your RAWR on the door sticker and that's how much camper and tongue weight you can add to the truck. I think you'll be disappointed. If you're one of those people that things you can't go over the GVWR on the truck then your plan probably won't work unless you get a pop-up type camper. I'm not one of those people.
KD4UPL 11/01/20 05:57am Truck Campers
RE: utility bed for truck camper

A camper on a utility body is tricky. A much better solution is a flatbed with tool boxes mounted under and over the flatbed. The tool boxes can be moved around to fit the camper and tie downs as needed. A utility bed has no provisions for camper tie downs. Some of the ones I've seen have it bolted on semi-permanently. Most stock utility bodies for a SRW truck are only 48" wide in the bed, not enough for most modern truck campers. Utility bodies for DRW trucks are a bit wider inside so some campers will fit. However, pretty much every camper out there widens out behind where a normal truck bed's wheel wells are. Since utility beds don't widen out they must be modified to fit the camper. As for height, most utility beds are taller than regular truck beds which also causes a problem. There are "low profile" beds that will work better. Classy Chassis used to offer a custom TC utility bed. It was aluminum. I priced one maybe 8 years ago and it was around $15,000. I went with a $6,000 aluminum flatbed with tool boxes instead.
KD4UPL 10/31/20 03:38pm Truck Campers
RE: Stop gap suspension advice

Have you checked the availability of KYB Monomax shocks? I have them on my 2005 Chevy dually. I used it to carry a 4,000 pound camper and thought the shocks did really well.
KD4UPL 10/30/20 06:10pm Truck Campers
RE: Exploded Battery!

A battery at 9 volts is probably bad and should have been replaced. Do you ever check the water in the batteries? I'd bet they ran dry.
KD4UPL 10/28/20 07:02pm General RVing Issues
RE: comfortable ride in an one ton dually??

How much pressure are you running in the tires? Many people who don't know any better just inflate all tires to the maximum pressure listed on the sidewall. This often leads to an overinflated tire for the load it's carrying which results in a harsh ride and increased tread wear in the center of the tire. Weight your axles, consult a tire load inflation chart, and inflate the tires accordingly. It could make a significant difference. Are you running good tires like Michelin or other name brand or are you running cheap generic tires? Riding in a new dually likely felt terrible because it was empty, I would assume, on a test drive. It also could have had overinflated tires as well. My 2005 Chevy dually rides quite well in my opinion but it is always loaded to at least 9,000 pounds and frequently closer to 11,000 pounds.
KD4UPL 10/24/20 08:31pm Fifth-Wheels
RE: Tire Pressure

If you run more pressure than the load calls for it can wear the tires out in the center faster than the edges. I had that problem on my 2500 Suburban. The tires are rated for 80 psi. The door placard calls for the rear tires to be 71 psi. I was running them at 65 psi because I know I'm not near max axle weight. The rear tires were wearing out in the center so I lowered it to 55psi. According to the load inflation table that's all I need to carry the weight I've got on the rear tires so that makes it the proper pressure. Running 80 psi would be an incredibly harsh ride and wear the tires out worse. You need to weight your axles, consult the chart, and inflate accordingly. Any other method is a guess and likely wrong.
KD4UPL 10/23/20 05:58pm Towing
RE: Ford F150 battery drain when towing Travel Trailer

Are you perhaps running your RV's absorption refrigerator on the DC setting?
KD4UPL 10/20/20 08:12pm Tech Issues
RE: What are the top 5 advantages of a TC?

In VA anyway: no tags, no inspections, no personal property tax. Most class C MH's can't tow anywhere near what a truck with TC can and good luck finding one with a diesel and 4wd. With the right truck, belted seating positions for 6 passengers.
KD4UPL 10/19/20 07:47pm Truck Campers
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