Good Sam Club Open Roads Forum: Search
Open Roads Forum Already a member? Login here.   If not, Register Today!  |  Help

Newest  |  Active  |  Popular  |  RVing FAQ Forum Rules  |  Forum Posting Help and Support  |  Contact  



Open Roads Forum  >  Search the Forums

 > Your search for posts made by 'LOG' found 30 matches.

Sort by:    Search within results:
Page of 2  
Next
  Subject Author Date Posted Forum
RE: Best Class C for the money

Tropicaal36 posted "Gee....after all that, I don't understand why a Class C doesn't cost a lot more than a DP/A....lol Hey whatever floats one's boat and why they make one for everyone. I used to have some arguments against a DP, but now that we have one, there's no going back to anything else, for us and not many do." The Original Poster asked a question about a Class C motorhome in a Class C forum. A poster with a Diesel Pusher asked why the OP did not consider a Class A motorhome. And someone then wonders about the responses received?
LOG 05/19/20 08:18am Class C Motorhomes
RE: Best Class C for the money

There are only four reasons for a diesel pusher. Room, washing machine, and dishwasher. And Prestige. Room is the only one worth considering. A Class C can support a toad. Class C's have Corian surfaces, tile floors, safe, vacuum cleaner, Satellite TV, etc. They are easier to drive, cost less to operate, easier to service. All given up is room and prestige.
LOG 05/18/20 04:58pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Best Class C for the money

IMHO, our Chinook Glacier is the best built Class C motorhome. I believe that is why 2005 models are listed for sale in the 50,000 dollar range. It is probably not the most reliable due to hydraulic levelers, hydraulic slide with pneumatic seal, satellite TV, GPS navigation, 2000 watt inverter. As far as driving is concerned. We have owned a 27 foot Class A motorhome, a 36 foot diesel pusher, and our 25 foot Class C. IMHO, the Class C is by far the easiest to drive. No comparison.
LOG 05/18/20 05:10am Class C Motorhomes
RE: Battery Charging Problem ***UPDATE***

Log, Why do you think I'm attempting to teach you anything? I don't see your name in any of my recent posts on the thread. Maybe you need to go back and read your posts about "hydrometers" and "dancing on the head of needles", and how I determine fully charged.
LOG 04/01/20 05:28pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Battery Charging Problem ***UPDATE***

Pianotuna, When I purchased our Foretravel diesel pusher in 2013. It had the identical 12 volt system as our boat. Even the isolators were from the same company. The only difference was that it had a lot less batteries and one alternator.
LOG 04/01/20 04:30pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Battery Charging Problem ***UPDATE***

Pianatuna. Before RVing, I had a boat. From 2002 until 2013 I spent months and months anchored in the Bahamas and Exumas. The boat had a single 6 cylinder inline diesel engine. It had two alternators (one 70 amp and one 120 amp), two smart battery chargers (one 40 amp and one 60 amp). The 60 amp was fully field repairable. It had a 2500 watt inverter and a 8 kilowatt diesel generator. It had ten group 31 Lifeline AGM batteries. Five banks, three banks with one battery, one bank with three batteries, and one bank with four batteries. Are you reading? In 2002 it had ten Lifeline AGM batteries. Do you really believe there is something you can teach me about 12 volt batteries and charging systems? Really?
LOG 04/01/20 04:06pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Battery Charging Problem ***UPDATE***

Whizbang, I apologize for hijacking your thread. I was simply trying to get Theoldwizard1 and Pianotuna to admit that you did not need one. I was unsuccessful.
LOG 03/30/20 08:28pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Battery Charging Problem

Log, Your needs are met by your system. Mine are different, so of course, my recommendation to others is different than yours. My intent was not to upset you. I'm sorry if our verbal exchange did so. I am not upset. But I do question if you are intellectually dishonest. You recommend a DC to DC battery charger. But you do not use one. You question how I can determine battery state of charge without a hydrometer. But your system cannot be tested with one. ETc, Etc, Etc. You give your motorhome as an example of a system that does not fully charge the house bank. But you do not use a DC to Dc charger. Go figure?
LOG 03/30/20 08:06pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Battery Charging Problem ***UPDATE***

OK, how about a TIME OUT. If you want/think you need smart charging from your alternator, you will need an alternator with external regulator. Then buy a smart regulator-- we have had one to control the sailboat's 120 amp alternator for a decade. NEXT. Thank you. Now please address the need for a DC to Dc battery charger in a Class C Motorhome. The reason for this discussion. A response from a recognized expert is more than welcomed. This is my last post in this thread.
LOG 03/30/20 05:08pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Battery Charging Problem ***UPDATE***

You have really gone beyond the need for a DC to DC battery charger. Log, Most of the charging is done via solar. When I am on shore power, I use a Magnum inverter charger with temperature compensation. The remote for the Magnum allows me to adjust charging voltages to meet my needs. Any charging I get while traveling is incidental. It would not be adequate to my needs. If I intended to fully charge while driving, I would get a dc to DC device. They are far cheaper than an isolation device. Then I could easily meet Trojan's suggestion of 14.8 volts to fully charge one of their lead acid jars. Somehow I get the impression that your Magnum charger and your system is OK and you have fully charged batteries, but my charger and my way of determining full charge is inadequate or wrong. Why is that?
LOG 03/30/20 04:56pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Battery Charging Problem ***UPDATE***

Log, Voltage may be the least accurate method to check state of charge. I suggest verifying the charge level a few times using a temperature compensated hydrometer. You may be surprised at of "real" state of charge where the battery charger goes into float mode. How do you determine state of charge with your AGM batteries? Not by some electronic tester I would suspect?
LOG 03/30/20 04:44pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Battery Charging Problem ***UPDATE***

Log, I'm glad your system works well for your needs. It takes a great deal of time for a battery bank to become full. At 85% state of charge, the acceptance rate is a mere 15 amps per 100 amp hours of capacity. The closer the battery bank is to full the slower the charging rate. Sulphated batteries behave by showing they are fully charged by voltage, shortly after being connected to a charger. Most "smart" chargers fail to drive a battery 100% state of charge. Getting to truly 100% requires "dancing on the needles", especially if voltage is the only parameter being used. You have really gone beyond the need for a DC to DC battery charger.
LOG 03/30/20 04:31pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Battery Charging Problem ***UPDATE***

Log, Voltage may be the least accurate method to check state of charge. I suggest verifying the charge level a few times using a temperature compensated hydrometer. You may be surprised at of "real" state of charge where the battery charger goes into float mode. By the way, how is that hydrometer working out with your AGM batteries?
LOG 03/30/20 04:25pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Battery Charging Problem ***UPDATE***

Log, Voltage may be the least accurate method to check state of charge. I suggest verifying the charge level a few times using a temperature compensated hydrometer. You may be surprised at of "real" state of charge where the battery charger goes into float mode. My battery tester, a state of the art micro-load electronic tester, shows voltage, state of charge, amp hours, cca, marine cca, percent of amp hours, etc. It is the same one use by auto/rv shops around the US. I recommend that you research micro-load battery testers.
LOG 03/30/20 04:16pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Battery Charging Problem ***UPDATE***

Log, Voltage may be the least accurate method to check state of charge. I suggest verifying the charge level a few times using a temperature compensated hydrometer. You may be surprised at of "real" state of charge where the battery charger goes into float mode. I believe voltage is close enough for this discussion The issue here is whether or not a motorhome with a "smart" charging system fully charges the batteries with the engine alternator. And if they require a DC to DC battery charger as advocated by you and THEOLDWIZARD1. The answer is they obviously don't. The fact that your highly modified motorhome may require one in no way shows that the average motorhome requires one. After a day of driving, even if the batteries were slightly lower than fully charged, shore power or generator would almost immediately restore them to fully charge (measured by any method). This high tech talk you are exposes means nothing to the regular motorhome owner. And, the suggestion that they should add an expensive, unnecessary piece of equipment as a DC to DC battery charger is ill advised.
LOG 03/30/20 04:08pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Battery Charging Problem ***UPDATE***

Log, How do you measure fully charged on your battery bank? Fully charged on my batteries is when my battery charger goes to float mode. Float mode on my battery charger depends on temperature of the batteries because it is temperature compensated. That would be somewhere close to 13.2 volts. If measured at rest, without any source of charging, the batteries would measure around 12.7 volts. When I pull into a campground after a day of driving (around six hours), and hook up to shore power, my battery charger goes almost immediately to float. If they were not fully charged at that time, the battery charger would go into Bulk mode. I would like to add that my battery tester is a professional level OTC micro-load electronic battery tester that sells for more than $500. It is not a simple multi-meter tester.
LOG 03/30/20 03:35pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Battery Charging Problem ***UPDATE***

It appears that your motorhome has the voltage drop problem that DrewE was explaining. And has nothing to do with a "smart" charging system. Maybe you need a better battery isolation manager or combiner. LOG, I have dual charging paths with #8 wire (rating 50 amps) with dual solenoids, each rated at 200 amps continuous. I have manual control of the solenoids and charging from the alternator. Each charging path is protected by a 50 amp automatic circuit breaker. If the house batteries are "hungry", then I see more than 75 amps of charging. (my meter only reads to 75 amps). On occasion I've observed at least one of the circuit breakers flipping off and then on. On normal use, because my starting battery is given a maintenance charge when ever the sun is shining, I see little charging after the starter battery is full from the ecm's point of view. I can "force" charging of the house bank by using the inverter and running the 1400 watt water heater. However this does, after about 20 minutes, cause the starter battery to go down to 12.3 volts. At that point, I use my manual control to stop the charging, and I disconnect the water heater. The reason for doing so, is the 1/3:2/3 duty cycle on the alternator which I do not wish to burn out. After 40 minutes of highway driving, I can repeat the above process. The last hour of driving I use to return some charge to the house bank. I can "see" one of the breakers flipping in and out if I run the engine and use the microwave (170 amps draw) and the induction cooker (70 to 130 amps) at the same time. These observations are from 2013 when I had 8 identical marine jars, one of which was used as a starter battery, and the house banks were configured as 3 and 4. Both banks were wired in a balanced manner. The "house" bank was 875 amp-hours @ 12 volts. It appears that your motorhome is not the typical motorhome that one would expect to see in a later model motorhome with a "smart" charging system as was explained in one of the first post in this thread by Theoldwizard1. Would you provide an example of a newer motorhome that would not fully charge the house bank with the engine alternator. My older 2005 motorhome does not have that problem. I simply start the engine, drive to my destination, and when I arrive my engine battery and house bank are both fully charged, without my having done anything other than driving and listening to then radio.
LOG 03/30/20 12:24pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Battery Charging Problem ***UPDATE***

A smart charging system WILL NEVER FULLY CHARGE A "HOUSE BATTERY BANK" ! It appears that this is just an opinion. I mistakenly understood it to be a fact.
LOG 03/30/20 11:43am Class C Motorhomes
RE: Battery Charging Problem ***UPDATE***

Would you please provide the year, make and model of a motorhome that has a "smart" charging system that would do that. Thanks. My own RV exhibits this behavior. 2005 Kustom Koach. It appears that your motorhome has the voltage drop problem that DrewE was explaining. And has nothing to do with a "smart" charging system. Maybe you need a better battery isolation manager or combiner.
LOG 03/30/20 11:12am Class C Motorhomes
RE: Battery Charging Problem ***UPDATE***

Lets say a new motorhome with a smart charging system also included a battery combiner that connected the chassis battery and the house bank when the engine is running. Would the ECM still see the chassis battery as fully charged and drop the alternator voltage before both are fully charged? Yes the ECM "sees" the chassis battery and drops the alternator voltage. Yes and no. The ECM sees the voltage at the chassis battery. Provided the two batteries are connected with a low enough resistance connection, the voltage will be practically the same at both batteries, and the ECM will see that same voltage and not deem the battery to be charged and drop the voltage until both are at whatever it thinks is fully charged. Not all motorhomes have a connection between them with a low enough resistance for this to work too well. That could be because the wire is insufficiently heavy, or there's a poor connection somewhere, or in some cases because an auto-resetting circuit breaker is clicking on and off (and, of course, has a very high resistance in the off state). The greater the resistance is in the connection, the greater the voltage drop will be to the house batteries, and the more prematurely the charge voltage will drop. Thanks for that explanation. That makes sense to me. However, my understanding is that we are talking here about a "smart" charging system on newer motorhomes that come from the factory with a system deigned to do that.
LOG 03/30/20 10:47am Class C Motorhomes
Sort by:    Search within results:
Page of 2  
Next


New posts No new posts
Closed, new posts Closed, no new posts
Moved, new posts Moved, no new posts

Adjust text size:




© 2020 CWI, Inc. © 2020 Good Sam Enterprises, LLC. All Rights Reserved.