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RE: One Great Big EV Thread

https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/51098010553_3a93e32fc6_c.jpg Curb Weight: 3366_________________________________ 3582 lbs. Long range: _________________________________________________ 4065 lbs. I probably missed a post but why the weight reference?
Reisender 05/08/21 12:14pm Around the Campfire
RE: One Great Big EV Thread

Exactly.
Reisender 05/07/21 08:13pm Around the Campfire
RE: One Great Big EV Thread

OK, I am putting together an numeric analysis and I need to tap into brain trust of those with BEVs. Based on the following statement, I calculate 1 mile will require 0.333 Kwh of power. Is this accurate? Electric vehicles need to be plugged in, often for many hours, to fully recharge a depleted battery. As a result, EV owners will most likely choose to charge their vehicle at home while the car is parked in the driveway or garage. Adding an EV to a home’s electrical load will have an impact on the total amount of electricity consumed—i.e., higher monthly electric bills. For example, a typical midsize EV driven 30 miles daily will require about 10 kWh of electricity to be fully recharged each day, or about 300 kWh per month. This load can amount to a 25 to 60 percent increase in monthly electricity consumption for the average household.18 https://www.ucsusa.org/sites/default/files/2019-09/electric-car-global-warming-emissions-report.pdf What would be an appropriate rate for a fullsize BEV? Or would it be the same.... Our lifetime average for power to distance is 6.4 kilometres to 1 kWh of electricity. Mostly commuting but maybe 15 percent longer road trips. That changes with the seasons as we travel less in winter. Our commute has shortened somewhat and we only do about 1100 to 1200 kilometres a month now. Our monthly power bill is probably 20 bucks higher than if we didn’t have an EV. We pay about 9 cents per kWh plus tax for hydro. CAD. Hydro is fairly cheap here. The vehicle is about a midsize sedan. Don’t know if any of that is useful data to you.
Reisender 05/07/21 09:16am Around the Campfire
RE: One Great Big EV Thread

Well, it kinda depends on ones definition of progress etc. But yah, I agree, some of it depends on the infrastructure supportinh the vehicle. Interestingly enough we have owned versions of both vehicles in the picture below. The other thing they don't say is the leaf on the left could fast charge to 80 percent of its range (72 miles) in 30 minutes. Ten years later the Tesla on the right can charge to 80 percent of its range (263 miles or 3 times the range of the leaf on the left) in about 20 minutes. Where will it be in 15 years. Who knows. https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/51098010553_3a93e32fc6_c.jpg
Reisender 05/07/21 07:47am Around the Campfire
RE: One Great Big EV Thread

Hence, the need for government mandates. BEVs will become more widespread when it is illegal to buy anything else. Nothing will be made illegal. There will be incentives like there has always been to support public policy. I expect battery electric vehicles will be the go-fast luxury vehicles and hydrogen FCEVs the rest of the vehicles. California says otherwise. After 2035, it will be illegal to buy a new ICE vehicle in California. https://www.edmunds.com/car-news/california-mandates-electric-cars-for-2035.html I don’t really think there will be a need to outlaw the sale of gas vehicles in 15 or 20 years. I really doubt any manufacturer will be building and compelling or competitive gas car, SUV or light trucks like half tons. Who would they sell them to. In 15 years EV’s will have evolved way past what they are now and they are already superior to gassers on so many levels. Nobody is going to want to buy a stinky, noisy, high maintenance, gutless, clunky, shifty, expensive to fuel vehicle that you can’t fuel at home. Time will tell.
Reisender 05/07/21 06:47am Around the Campfire
RE: One Great Big EV Thread

Battery electric cars are unlikely to become widespread as the cost of lithium will only go up from here. Lithium is found in relatively few places in the world and when it is found it is in low concentrations. Example: The largest known deposit in the US at Thacker Pass in Nevada has a concentration of just 0.33%. Upper continental crust and mantle concentrations are even lower at 0.0035% and 0.00015% respectively. Source: https://www.geol.umd.edu/~mcdonoug/documents/geochemistry/Geochemistry,%20Solid%20Earth,%20Deep/Teng_etal_(GCA_04).pdf Define widespread.
Reisender 05/06/21 02:34pm Around the Campfire
RE: One Great Big EV Thread

Yes, but their target market is office commuters etc doing a typical commute. A typical commute is about 8 KWH In North America. That’s about 50 kilometres. I can see that. Ours is about 6 KWH most days. If a user is using that little then why not charge when you get home? I don’t see the point. The idea is twofold. 1. Apartment dwellers that don’t have access to charging at home can charge daily at these facilities. 2. These are not connected to the grid in anyway and essentially shift the load off the grid. Definitely a quick problem solver for some applications. Keep in mind these are primarily L2 applications using a common J1772 plug so any EV can charge. They are starting to pop up more frequently in Europe as well. There is a German manufacturer, same idea although I believe they have bigger storage. I’ve seen a few of these and never seen them with a DCFC plug although I suppose it could work with enough storage. Like I say, primarily office commuters. They work well from what I gather.
Reisender 05/05/21 10:01pm Around the Campfire
RE: One Great Big EV Thread

Don’t know how practical those solar chargers are. With 12 400-watt panels each they might be able to produce 75 kWh per day at the latitude of San Diego per charger. Yes, but their target market is office commuters etc doing a typical commute. A typical commute is about 8 KWH In North America. That’s about 50 kilometres. I can see that. Ours is about 6 KWH most days.
Reisender 05/05/21 08:27pm Around the Campfire
RE: One Great Big EV Thread

Charging up at home is certainly convenient however electricity in the quantities needed for vehicle charging is not portable. When hurricanes or winter storms take down power lines then home vehicle charging will be left high and dry. Meh. Not an issue here. We get power outages from time to time, but they are never more than a few hours long. I only charge up once or twice a week. More susceptible areas will have to prepare better I suppose. Nice for you, but we need to consider the Florida coasts and Texas gulf coast too. Power outages from hurricanes can last weeks. Think about the traffic jams you see on the news when populations are evacuating. Everybody needing an hour to charge their car every 250 miles? Yah I get that. Lots of extreme weather there. But EV’s are evolving pretty quick. The latest models charge 200 miles in 15 minutes. That will probably be mainstream in a few years. Things will look different in 5 years than they are today. And five years after that things will change again. It may be different there but here BC Canada if there is a power outage the gas stations are all closed as well. I can see governments having to rethink infrastructure needs as alternative fueled vehicles gain popularity. We are noticing some of that here with BC Hydro adding some DCFC stations on some pretty remote highways presumably for winter storm situations. We have just been passing them by but I can see how they would be handy in unexpected harsh winter conditions.
Reisender 05/05/21 08:23pm Around the Campfire
RE: One Great Big EV Thread

Lol. :). I saw a 120 service outlet that might work.
Reisender 05/05/21 07:57pm Around the Campfire
RE: Ram TRX vs Cybertruck

That front end actually has some style and class to it. So many are just square blocks. It looks different than the one in the neighbourhood too. Maybe a model year thing.
Reisender 05/05/21 06:51pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Tesla Semi truck unveil & test ride set for Oct 26th !

Tesla Powerwall owner shows how the battery system can withstand 48-hour outage with solar power https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/51160232451_cba736964a_c.jpg That’s pretty cool. Enjoy your posts. Interesting stuff.
Reisender 05/05/21 04:11pm Tow Vehicles
RE: One Great Big EV Thread

Folks, let's stop with the quotes within quotes within quotes within quotes within quotes please. Just quote the member to which you are responding to, and if it is the post directly above you, you do not need to quote at all. Thanks. Check.
Reisender 05/05/21 03:56pm Around the Campfire
RE: One Great Big EV Thread

I have no problem with hydrogen. I can see getting the price down so it’s competitive with electricity might be a challenge though. That and there is a whole bunch of people getting used to the convenience of fueling at home. Not sure if that is doable with hydrogen. I can see some advantages for over the road trucking though. Not to mention vehicles like our F350 dually diesels etc. Charging up at home is certainly convenient however electricity in the quantities needed for vehicle charging is not portable. When hurricanes or winter storms take down power lines then home vehicle charging will be left high and dry. Meh. Not an issue here. We get power outages from time to time, but they are never more than a few hours long. I only charge up once or twice a week. More susceptible areas will have to prepare better I suppose. May get an electric someday but will probably wait for hydrogen. It better fits one of our use cases which is making a 500 mile drive to stay at a ski area, sometimes into a winter storm warning. We do a couple of 5 minute fuel ups along the way. That scenario is not going to happen with batteries. Fair enough. But not everybody is as constrained for time. The extra 20 -30 minutes in an EV for that trip might be worth it to some as an EV has a lot of advantages. I think in your case a bigger challenge would be is if the infrastructure is in place on the route you need to go. We are very fortunate in that infrastructure is pretty good on the routes we travel, but at least for the near future that may not be the case for some or even many people depending on where they are and where they are going. That will take time. Jmho. You must take into account that electric cars lose significant range in cold temperatures particularly the temperatures I am talking. Running the electric heat pump takes energy also. Hydrogen fuel cells generate heat as a part of the hydrogen and oxygen combining. Also right now there is hydrogen at the Amazon and Walmart warehouses fueling hydrogen forklifts every 3 seconds across the country. Hydrogen forklifts moved 1/3 of US groceries in the US in the last year and don’t have any performance degradation in cold warehouses. Yah I’m not up on hydrogen much. But we live in Canada and honestly a 500 mile trip in the winter probably wouldn’t take any longer in our EV than it would in our old grand Cherokee. But that is mostly because we travel different than you. You take two 5 minute fuel breaks on your 500 mile trip. We would stop at least 20 minutes for lunch and probably once or twice for a coffee and pee break for 10 or 15 minutes. We just charge while we are stopped. We do trips like that now. But again we have two things going for us, good infrastructure and the extra 20 or 30 minutes for charging that we would be taking as a break anyway. Different people, different needs and styles of travelling and of course it depends where you travel. Cheers.
Reisender 05/05/21 03:49pm Around the Campfire
RE: One Great Big EV Thread

I have no problem with hydrogen. I can see getting the price down so it’s competitive with electricity might be a challenge though. That and there is a whole bunch of people getting used to the convenience of fueling at home. Not sure if that is doable with hydrogen. I can see some advantages for over the road trucking though. Not to mention vehicles like our F350 dually diesels etc. Charging up at home is certainly convenient however electricity in the quantities needed for vehicle charging is not portable. When hurricanes or winter storms take down power lines then home vehicle charging will be left high and dry. Meh. Not an issue here. We get power outages from time to time, but they are never more than a few hours long. I only charge up once or twice a week. More susceptible areas will have to prepare better I suppose. May get an electric someday but will probably wait for hydrogen. It better fits one of our use cases which is making a 500 mile drive to stay at a ski area, sometimes into a winter storm warning. We do a couple of 5 minute fuel ups along the way. That scenario is not going to happen with batteries. Fair enough. But not everybody is as constrained for time. The extra 20 -30 minutes in an EV for that trip might be worth it to some as an EV has a lot of advantages. I think in your case a bigger challenge would be is if the infrastructure is in place on the route you need to go. We are very fortunate in that infrastructure is pretty good on the routes we travel, but at least for the near future that may not be the case for some or even many people depending on where they are and where they are going. That will take time. Jmho.
Reisender 05/05/21 03:05pm General RVing Issues
RE: One Great Big EV Thread

I have no problem with hydrogen. I can see getting the price down so it’s competitive with electricity might be a challenge though. That and there is a whole bunch of people getting used to the convenience of fueling at home. Not sure if that is doable with hydrogen. I can see some advantages for over the road trucking though. Not to mention vehicles like our F350 dually diesels etc. Charging up at home is certainly convenient however electricity in the quantities needed for vehicle charging is not portable. When hurricanes or winter storms take down power lines then home vehicle charging will be left high and dry. Meh. Not an issue here. We get power outages from time to time, but they are never more than a few hours long. I only charge up once or twice a week. More susceptible areas will have to prepare better I suppose.
Reisender 05/05/21 02:25pm Around the Campfire
RE: One Great Big EV Thread

I have no problem with hydrogen. I can see getting the price down so it’s competitive with electricity might be a challenge though. That and there is a whole bunch of people getting used to the convenience of fueling at home. Not sure if that is doable with hydrogen. I can see some advantages for over the road trucking though. Not to mention vehicles like our F350 dually diesels etc.
Reisender 05/05/21 01:47pm Around the Campfire
RE: One Great Big EV Thread

Kind of last months news but from a different source. GM’s Silverado EV info. For the GM crowd. https://www.bnnbloomberg.ca/general-motors-to-announce-electric-pickup-at-detroit-plant-1.1586749
Reisender 05/05/21 11:09am Around the Campfire
RE: Tesla Semi truck unveil & test ride set for Oct 26th !

Would be sad to not get the new 4680 cells just to be first. Don’t know for sure but doubt that would happen. I think the battery in the CT may be structural. Just a guess but have seen some mumblings on the web about that.
Reisender 05/04/21 10:51am Tow Vehicles
RE: One Great Big EV Thread

Cuz Sam, it happened with Apple, remember? https://www.npr.org/2020/11/18/936268845/apple-agrees-to-pay-113-million-to-settle-batterygate-case-over-iphone-slowdowns Apple on Wednesday agreed to pay $113 million to settle consumer fraud lawsuits brought by more than 30 states over allegations that it secretly slowed down old iPhones, a controversy that became known as "batterygate." Apple first denied that it purposely slowed down iPhone batteries, then said it did so to preserve battery life amid widespread reports of iPhones unexpectedly turning off. The company maintained that it wasn't necessary for iPhone users to replace their sluggish phones, but state attorneys general led by Arizona found people saw no other choice. History has a way of repeating itself. Imagine if there is a shortage of Lithium, thus preventing consumers from replacing EV battery packs as scheduled, after 10 years of use.... Which EV manufacturers have a schedule that says EV batteries need to be replaced after 10 years of use? I have never heard of this.
Reisender 05/04/21 10:09am Around the Campfire
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