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RE: Switching from 12 volt to 6 volt batteries

I have agree with Vintage465. My propane ain't broke, and it don't need fixing. It is perfect for boondocking. I get it though. Absorption fridges are kind of a pain at times, for some people, and the urge to go with a residential fridge is strong. All kinds of ways of justifying a residential unit in an RV have been posted. Now that solar and lots of battery are all the rage, some have lost interest in efficient off-grid practices. Just throw juice at whatever inconvenience comes along. Okay as long as the weather stays clear and sunny. Whether it runs through an inverter, or directly on 12v battery, a residential fridge is what it is. We are out camping without internet in the southern Canadian Rockies. Made it to town and have a few comments on your post. 1) Residential fridges and what the OP is talking about are quite different. 2) We have the option of having propane or all electric 12 v fridges in our RV's when camping. You choose to ignore the positives of all electric fridges even though many including myself have successfully dry camped for 5 years with one and you have never had any experience except for the fact that you have enjoyed residential fridges at home for the last many, many years. 3)Because 12 v fridges are your biggest draw of electricity from your batteries, you just naturally look for ways to conserve when boondocking. 4) Solar and batteries are the rage because they work.I am on a 2 month staycation dry camping in BC and in the end, no Genny or shore power, all because of solar/ batteries. Dave
crosscheck 07/13/20 09:18pm Travel Trailers
RE: Switching from 12 volt to 6 volt batteries

No, no, no... This Furrion given in links above is not a Danfoss-style compressor, it is not efficient. It draws 15 amps, the real camping-style compressor fridges draw 3-5 amps max and do not need a spike of electricity to get the compressor started either. There would be no point to put that in an RV unless you are always plugged in. I have one of these ICECO Compressor Fridgehttps://www.wayfair.com/appliances/pdp/iceco-211-cuft-frost-free-chest-freezer-ieco1002.html Though you will have to search another site to find specs... I have 2 GC batts and could easily go 3 days without use of solar charging. With solar this will run indefinately 5 amps draw is the max any compressor DC powered fridge should pull, typically 3-4 is normal, and they run a few minutes only before shutting off, having reached the cold temp. As I said... 8-10 mins per hour total of run time seems normal. You can insulate the sides and top to make it more efficient, but I have not needed to do this yeat. Also see ARB and Dometic for other more popular models. The one you link is a 2 C.F. that is listed at 7.5 amps. The Furrion is 10 C.F. and is listed at 15 amps. I'd assume a larger fridge would use a larger compressor, and thus more amps. I'm not an expert by any means, but the Furrion appears to be far more efficient than yours, if you take into account energy use per volume. I never measured, but I'd imagine mine runs about fifteen minutes every hour, but I keep it about 3/4 the way toward the cold side. I'd imagine if I put it in the middle, it'd run about ten minutes an hour. Just looked up a 9 cuft NovaKool fridge/freezer on their website. Althought slightly smaller than your unit, it draws 5.2 amps which is in line with our 7.5 unit which draws 4.4 as per tester. That's almost 3 times more than the NovaKool unit. Dave
crosscheck 07/08/20 09:28am Travel Trailers
RE: Switching from 12 volt to 6 volt batteries

My absorption fridge works fine but I would replace it in a heart beat if it quit. Dave Hi Dave, There is a firm that will retrofit a compressor to your existing Fridge. That is what I will do when the end of days takes my absorption fridge down. Don, Thanks for that info.As I mentioned earlier, a 9 cuft NovaKool would fit into the same spot as the 6cuft Norcold.Right now we would like the extra space. Dave
crosscheck 07/08/20 09:12am Travel Trailers
RE: Switching from 12 volt to 6 volt batteries

Couple things to add, That 12v fridge is bad news for boondocking. They are very inefficient. Normally only find those in popup style rigs. But, I guess you're stuck with it. Get more battery. I like the Vmax line of 6vdc. And with those AGM, you do not need to put them in a battery box. They are safe in any orientation. That might allow you to get even more than 2 of them, but you do need pairs. Unless you look at the Vmax 12vdc AGM. I don't have the 12v, but I would trust the name. The cheap club store batteries will need to be in a box, and you'll likely end up replacing them sooner. Depending on how you maintain them. Might or might not be worth the savings to you. One of the main reasons I chose a Danfos compressor style 12V fridge /freezer was because the they are a favourite of the ultimate boondockers which are yachters. They can't use propane fridges because propane is heavier than air and could sink to the lower decks if there was a leak and could cause an explosion. Our camping style is 98% dry/boondock camping. For 5 years, we camped with a 7.5cuft NovaKool fridge/freezer which when cycling used 4.4A. They are more efficient than absorption fridges using 1/3 less energy. They cool much quicker, for the same outer dimensions, have 1/3 more volume, keep more consistant temperatures in hot ambient temperatures and are not a fire hazard. We almost never needed our 2000W genny as we had 4 6V AGM batteries and lots of solar. People who use the term"12V fridges are bad news for boondocking" have never had this kind of fridge. They are becoming much more popular for so many reasons as long as you figure in more electrical capacity(batteries, solar) if you don't want to run your genny. I have a 6 cuft absorption fridge in my TT which came with the new unit. If it gives up the ghost down the line, a 9 cuft NovaKool will fit exactly in the same opening and as I already have plenty of solar and 4 6V GC-2 batteries and more room for extra solar, this is the route I will go. Dave That does sound like an efficient 12v fridge. My concern as a boon docker is I hate.........did I say hate?.... Generators. I'll do most anything not to use a generator. And I like camping year round. That include weather that gets down in the teens. I'd need enough battery to run my furnace to heat the the belly of the coach to keep the tanks warm enough. I can keep up with my furnace pretty easily with my solar, but I think if you tagged another fairly high draw unit on the 4-6v's it'd get critical. Bottom line is you really have to prioritize your usage choice. I want a furnace, a C-pap, no genny and winter. Prolly nixes the 12v fridge...for my boon docking needs. Howdy, to another Creekside owner. Another neat plus for compressor fridges is that they can be operational without problems out of level for long periods of time.( Again, think of yachts). No question, the NovaKool was the largest single draw of battery power bar none.So if you had to choose, get rid of the OEM heater fan and put in a Cat heater. I have no experience with these but some say they work well. My absorption fridge works fine but I would replace it in a heart beat if it quit. Dave
crosscheck 07/07/20 09:50pm Travel Trailers
RE: Switching from 12 volt to 6 volt batteries

One of the main reasons I chose a Danfos compressor style 12V fridge /freezer was because the they are a favourite of the ultimate boondockers which are yachters....snip Using 12VDC is by far the least efficient way to generate heat, out of the 3 utilities common on RVs. That's not to say it isn't appropriate in some situations. You mentioned one. If you've got enough solar and battery bank to support it, more power to you. I've noticed there isn't much shade over sailboats. I have seen a 12vdc fridge run our truck battery down during a single overnight stop at a motel. GM truck, which did not isolate the trailer from the starting battery. So it depleted the trailer battery and the truck battery. I wasn't the owner, but I was a participant, and it was my AAA card that got us back on the road that morning. "Compressor Refrigerators They use a process that compresses refrigerant to draw hot air out of the food compartment and vent it out the back or top of the fridge. They are highly efficient compared to absorption refrigerators." These are not my words but taken from a technical article regarding RV's. Compressor fridges do not use heat to make cold like absorption fridges do, that is why they are more efficient in energy use. If you are set up for high efficient compressor fridges, they work much better than absorption fridges. Just read all of the posts by big rigs who are turfing their Norcold units for compressor fridges. One last thought, as most modern houses/apartments/businesses have natural gas and could have absorbtion appliances for cooling/freezing, why is compressor technology used in fridge/ freezers in 100% of domestic and industrial applications throughout the modern world? Check out our blog when we had our previous rv an Outfitter TC for 5 years. You will see our camping style is "dry" with very few times using genny or shore power and our compressor fridge was never a problem regarding running down the batteries. Dave
crosscheck 07/07/20 11:00am Travel Trailers
RE: Stay on your own side....

In New Zealand, they have got new cases down to zero. The have returned to life. Italy, new cases are down 97% from their peak. And for this discussion Canada is down 80% from peak. Meanwhile in US the number of cases is increasing at a increasing rate. Why should a country risk all the work they have done to protect their country when have the people in US, instead of picking up their gun and fighting the invading army, we invite them in for supper, make sure they have a nice bed to spend the night. I usually fish in Ontario 6x a year. Not this year due to health & it being nonessential. Canada should not let we Americans in until we get under the curve. We need to shut it down and stay at home. Ever considered a career in the White House? Dave
crosscheck 07/07/20 08:37am General RVing Issues
RE: Switching from 12 volt to 6 volt batteries

Couple things to add, That 12v fridge is bad news for boondocking. They are very inefficient. Normally only find those in popup style rigs. But, I guess you're stuck with it. Get more battery. I like the Vmax line of 6vdc. And with those AGM, you do not need to put them in a battery box. They are safe in any orientation. That might allow you to get even more than 2 of them, but you do need pairs. Unless you look at the Vmax 12vdc AGM. I don't have the 12v, but I would trust the name. The cheap club store batteries will need to be in a box, and you'll likely end up replacing them sooner. Depending on how you maintain them. Might or might not be worth the savings to you. One of the main reasons I chose a Danfos compressor style 12V fridge /freezer was because the they are a favourite of the ultimate boondockers which are yachters. They can't use propane fridges because propane is heavier than air and could sink to the lower decks if there was a leak and could cause an explosion. Our camping style is 98% dry/boondock camping. For 5 years, we camped with a 7.5cuft NovaKool fridge/freezer which when cycling used 4.4A. They are more efficient than absorption fridges using 1/3 less energy. They cool much quicker, for the same outer dimensions, have 1/3 more volume, keep more consistant temperatures in hot ambient temperatures and are not a fire hazard. We almost never needed our 2000W genny as we had 4 6V AGM batteries and lots of solar. People who use the term"12V fridges are bad news for boondocking" have never had this kind of fridge. They are becoming much more popular for so many reasons as long as you figure in more electrical capacity(batteries, solar) if you don't want to run your genny. I have a 6 cuft absorption fridge in my TT which came with the new unit. If it gives up the ghost down the line, a 9 cuft NovaKool will fit exactly in the same opening and as I already have plenty of solar and 4 6V GC-2 batteries and more room for extra solar, this is the route I will go. Dave
crosscheck 07/06/20 07:17pm Travel Trailers
RE: BC Residents only

the only thing that was done is reservations are closed for no BC residents, if you previously had a reservation and you are from out of BC it will still be valid and you can come to FCFS sites. I think you'll see a lot of provinces going this way for the summer to try encourage "stay vacations" to help with COVID Steve As per BC Parks , non residents who have prior reservations for BC parks have until June 15th to contact them for a full refund. All non resident reservations are cancelled and after May 25th, if a non resident tries to make a reservation at a BC park, it will be rejected. Dave
crosscheck 05/22/20 06:26pm RVing in Canada and Alaska
RE: Carrying a Honda 2000i inside generator compartment

This is the set up I think you are looking at including security cable. The Citation TC before this one had no solar and like you, only place to store genny was on the floor behind driver. Big pain to move. In this Outfitter,we used the genny maybe only 3 times in 5 years because we ended up adding 330W solar plus 4 AGM 6V batteries under the dinette and we dry camped most of the time. https://i.imgur.com/ZrHAn1T.jpg width=800 Dave
crosscheck 04/05/20 11:03am Truck Campers
RE: Battery time. 6V?

In the RV world, the idea that 6V batteries are always the way to go, for everyone, every time, is a myth as persistent as never letting a battery sit on concrete. :):) I have observed RVers posts over the years on what are the best batteries and everyone has their own opinions on which batteries are the best for their situations, but I have never heard about this "myth" regarding 6V batteries, just honest, real life experiences from RVers. 38 years ago we purchased a 1978 Vanguard 8' TC which had an ice box, hand pumped fresh water system, manual lit HWT and manual lit furnace and 3 small lights all receiving power from a 12 V battery in the truck. Made due electrically as long as we did not use the furnace much(warm weather camping). Fast forward, we had a TC with 4x6V AGM's and presently a TT with 4x6V GC2's. Power requirements have changed over the years meaning that with the large increase in daily AH required, batteries have become a lot more relied upon in every day RV life. In our case we need batteries that can be drawn down a fair bit every day(we dry camp 95%) and charged back up to close to 100% with out having to be replaced every few years. Also, it would be nice if they were not too heavy and didn't break the bank. On the advice of many on this site, 6V GC2's were the popular choice but not the only choice. Your choice and number of batteries has a lot to do with your camping style(dry camping or power pole princess), battery location, (AGM required inside?) and budget(Lithium$$$). Dave
crosscheck 04/03/20 12:57pm Truck Campers
RE: Hand-powered chainsaw -- for emergency use

I have been using one of these folding saws for years and still have it in my toolbox. Cuts easily and stores in very little space without worrying about puncturing your skin while looking around. :) Barney Folding saw https://i.imgur.com/wtZs1erl.jpg width=400 I have one of these saws and they are quite sharp. Good for branches/ pruning. I bought it originally for back packing because it is so light and folds up nicely. It will cut through 6" wood if you have all day. If you want to butcher a steer, a very sharp 4"paring knife will work but a 14" sharp butcher knife will get the job done much quicker.Also, all of the regular wood saws all have handles where you have your fingers at right angle to your bade and thumb grasping the handle giving you lots of power on the cut. The opinel,s handle is more or less in line with the blade giving you less power on the cut. Just my personal experience. Dave
crosscheck 03/30/20 08:32pm General RVing Issues
RE: Hand-powered chainsaw -- for emergency use

Here is this handy little folding saw cutting up fire wood on a back packing through hike a few years back in the Canadian Rockies. Cuts through this dry snag in around 30 seconds if the blade is sharp. Takes up almost no room and is light. I still use this saw for firewood even if truck camping. Dave https://i.imgur.com/v4PeP01.jpg width=800
crosscheck 03/30/20 05:25pm General RVing Issues
RE: Hand-powered chainsaw -- for emergency use

Dan, Like you, we sometimes encounter downed trees when driving on back roads. Most of the time, unless they are huge pines etc,they can be pulled out of the way with a long chain and a good 4x4 truck with out any cutting. Because much of our camping/ back packing over the years has been in cool/cold northern mountainous areas, having a daily fire was more than just ambiance. I always carried a Coghlans folding alumium saw that could cut up 6" snags quickly for fire wood. Most of the wood for fires is from softwoods but the saw also cuts through dense desert hard woods but it is slower work. This is a light, back pack saw that is extremely sharp if you replace blades every year depending on usage but it cannot cut large diameter rounds as well as a full sized bow saw. I know you said that you already have a bow saw for emergencies but like another poster mentioned, the wider the kerf, the tougher the work. A chainsaw blade is wide compared to the blade for my foldable saw and I think it will prove to be a lot of work unless it is used just for the odd times in an emergency. If you have the time, go for it. Dave
crosscheck 03/16/20 11:33am General RVing Issues
RE: Diesel Brothers

It happens a couple of times every year. Out on a back road with a group of up to 10 road riders, single file getting a good workout. We get passed by most often an older style Ram with a younger male driver, "Rollin coal" as he traverses our group. Nothing we can do but continue riding when as a cyclist, you take life as it unfolds when sharing the road with motor vehicles. I figure this type of person has a bit of an attitude and probably ,"Rolls Coal" often just because they think it,s funny. I am sure that this kind of person makes up only a small percentage of chipped diesel owners. Dave
crosscheck 03/16/20 10:55am Tow Vehicles
RE: HUGE Propane tanks on new Backcountry models from ORV

HUGE? I thought I was going to read about a couple permanent tanks like on a MH. 40 is just top of the normal range. Although as said 40 is getting a bit heavy to manhandle as the years pass. I would rather have 3+ 30# cylinders for extended use. On our present TT,I have 3x30# tanks, 2 on the tongue and 1 in the PU bed as a spare for the TT and also to use for our BBQ and also for a small gas campfire when we are in places where open wood fires are forbidden.We camp frequently when temperatures drop down below freezing overnight. Nice to have that extra bottle. Dave
crosscheck 02/19/20 06:09am Travel Trailers
RE: Moisture under mattress solutions please

We had TC's for many years and camped in cool/cold weather a lot. ( We are from Canada).Condensation under matress was an issue. The reason is there is a thin layer of insulation between the bottom of your mattress(warm, moist air) and outside cold air. This causes condensation. My solution was to put a sheet of 1" styro under the whole matress and along the sides which touch the exterior walls same height as mattress. Problems solved. Dave
crosscheck 02/01/20 07:57am Truck Campers
RE: Looking for revelstoke recommendations

Don,t forget Keystone Basin for MTB. Check out trail forks for trail head directions( all day trip). Spectacular scenery on a nice day. Lots of good short to intermediate hiking in the area.We are only 1.5 hours West and Revy is one of our favorite areas to bike/hike/paddle. Have fun. Dave
crosscheck 01/31/20 05:28pm RVing in Canada and Alaska
RE: Looking for revelstoke recommendations

I agree with Soup, but you could take a look at Williamson Lake, it's away from the trains, south of town, has hook-ups and boat rental on the small lake. Its close to the airfield but don't worry about that as it's not used much and then mainly by light planes. Trevor We have stayed here a number of times but without hookups. There is limited serviced sites and summer is a busy time. Lake is warm and great to swim/ canoe/kayak in. Dave
crosscheck 01/29/20 08:15am RVing in Canada and Alaska
RE: Small flys/ gnats coming out of commode.

Last year was the first time ever in maybe 30 years of RVing that we had what we thought to be fruit flies all over the place. Next thing we noticed were translucent small flat larvae slithering up the sides of our toilet. Really creepy. Googled it and sewer flies was the answer. Bleach or very hot water poured down the toilet and drains. We decided on boiling hot water which did the trick. Killed the larvae,no more adults(flies). I had nightmares of sitting on the toilet and having giant, translucent, flesh eating worms crawling up the bowl from the black water tank looking for...... Dave
crosscheck 01/14/20 05:39pm Fifth-Wheels
RE: Thoughts on studded tires

Opinions on personal preferences regarding studded/non-studded snow tires are numerous judging by the replies. The one thing that can be agreed upon are the advances in true winter tires and studs over the years. We lived in snow/ice country for many years in north central BC and good traction on ice and snow was sometimes the difference between life and death. There always seemed not a day went by when you had to travel on steep driveways or icy roads while going to work or transporting kids to their tournaments to towns that were many hours drive away not to mention up the ski hill which steep grade roads were mainly hard packed snow and sometimes ice. I can remember the first time trying on a set of Blizzaks on our 4x4 Toyota van and being able to zip up our 16% driveway better than old style hard conpound snow tires with minimal problems. That was my first experience with soft rubber, true winter tires. The only down side was that because the winters were fairly long, you only got 2 seasons out of set of Blizzaks. We now live in the south to where there is less winter but still drive 4000' vertical from our house to the ski hill at least 6 days a week in the winter and many other trips over the mountain passes includding the "Coke" and Coquahalla connector sections of BC roads frequently driving on very icy/slippery sections at high speeds. Our tires of choice are true winter tires with studs on both our F350 4x4 and the AWD Rav4. Truck has Coopers with studs installed at the local dealer and Rav runs a set of Hakkapelitta 9's which has I think 9 rows of factory installed, 3 sided modern studs which provide less damage to roads and incredible grip in every winter condition. Dangerous winter driving conditions where there is potential for bad accidents includding injuries and death quite often do not include roads with a build up of snow. Most drivers slow down so if there are accidents they tend to be fender benders. Many serious winter accidents however are caused by black ice on a section of highway where motorists are travelling at least the posted speed which is fast for dangerous winter roads. You can't see the thin layer of black ice and the first time you realize that there is black ice on the road is when you start to lose control on a curve or downhill when going the speed limit. By this time it is too late. This is where modern studded snow tires out perform by a wide margin studless tires even with good winter tires. For my own safety and my families, I can put up with a bit of extra noise for much better handling on potentially hazardous winter roads. I learned a long time ago from the northern loggers who equiped their pick ups with studded snow tires for their daily drives to work on very treacheous, icy winter haul roads with very few accidents. "Better to have them and not need them, than need them and not have them". Dave
crosscheck 12/09/19 06:50pm Tow Vehicles
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