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RE: Another question about Banff to Jasper

https://i.imgur.com/RZmF6Si.jpg width=700 Views from Mt. Wilcox above Icefields tourist centre. You would be camping in that little square spot on the lower left part of the photo. Can't add much more than what has been posted but trying to drive into Morraine Lake in July and August is almost impossible unless you get there before 6:00AM. Try the RV overflow overnight parking south of Lake Louise where the shuttle to Morraine Lake and Lake Louise are marshalled. No services and there are no reservations but a very convenient place that is centrally located. The Ice Fields Visitors Centre is a great place to stop overnight. Lots of room and the back drop of the ice covered mountains should not be missed, especially if you like photography and hiking. Mt. Edith Cavell road was closed last year for upgrading. Check online on its status before going there. Dave
crosscheck 01/04/19 12:00pm RVing in Canada and Alaska
RE: Banff/Jasper July 2019

Dogs MUST be on a leash in the National Park. And NOT allowed on trails. Leave it home? There are restrictions re dogs on some trails in the Canadian NP system but mostly they are allowed on the trails. Research where in the NP you are going to get up to date hiking info on which trails allow dogs.Contrary to what was quoted above by the former NP warden,most NP trails in Canada allow dogs if they are on a leash. Dave
crosscheck 01/01/19 09:04pm RVing in Canada and Alaska
RE: I think Winter arrived

This was taken October 1st in the Silver Star Provincial Park which is above Vernon, BC. The Title: First and Last Tracks https://i.imgur.com/ylaYZ2V.jpg width=700 Bears before they den up and cross country skiing do not mix. Poor soul. Alls they found was his Lederhosen. Winter arrived here a long time ago. Dave
crosscheck 11/15/18 09:09pm General RVing Issues
RE: Canadian Rockies summer 2020

Lots of good info from 4runnerguy. Here are a few other suggestions. Gem Trek waterproof trail maps of the areas you plan to hike in. Gives good description of day and multi day hikes. You said serious hiking. This is of course quite subjective. Besides Canadian Rockies Trail Guide book, there is Scrambles in the Canadian Rockies by Alan Kane. Lots of easy to difficult scrambles, most with great views and few other hikers. There is descent overnight parking for big rigs(no services) at the Lake Louise RV overflow ($10.00). This is where you can pick up a shuttle bus(recommended) to both Lake Louise and Morraine Lake. Also overnight RV parking at the Columbia Icefields visitors centre($15.00). Tunnel Mountain (Banff),has full services or not as well as the other national parks. Canmore has serviced sites at their municipal CG. Peter Loughheed Park has plenty of big rig RV camp sites. Search on the web for reservations for the National and Provincial parks which are a must in the summer. Rockies National and Provincial Parks south to north: Waterton NP Akamina-Kishinena PP Top of the World PP Elk Lakes PP Peter Lougheed PP Mt. Assinaboine PP Banff NP Kootenay NP Yoho NP Jasper NP Robson PP Technically out of the Rockies but close and a real treat, Glacier NP(Canadian) Mt Revelstoke NP Bugaboos PP https://i.imgur.com/WEY5028.jpg width=700 Heading up to Waterfalls Creek, Jasper NP https://i.imgur.com/wLhXTcw.jpg width=700 Brazeau Lake from Cateract Pass, White Goat Wilderness area https://i.imgur.com/ST5pPFF.jpg width=700 Lake Minawanka from Cascade Mt.(scramble) https://i.imgur.com/RZmF6Si.jpg width=700 Looking down at the Columbia Icefields from Mt. Wilcox(scramble) https://i.imgur.com/hggKJKf.jpg width=700 Looking at mountains in the Peter Lougheed PP from Tent Ridge https://i.imgur.com/flq2kfv.jpg width=700 View from the alpinist route, Lake Ohara Opabin Pass(smoke in the air) https://i.imgur.com/I3DcLHN.jpg width=700 Floe Lake, Kootenay NP, the Rockwall https://i.imgur.com/O9CUMrJ.jpg width=700 View from Mt. Fairview, Lake Louise, Mt Aberdeen https://i.imgur.com/haAjq6d.jpg width=700 The Mitre, Sentinal Pass, Moraine Lake https://i.imgur.com/5LclNIp.jpg width=700 Lake Oesa, Lake Ohara area, Yoho NP https://i.imgur.com/QMLmtpX.jpg width=700 View from The Notch, Skyline Trail, Jasper NP https://i.imgur.com/OVTpLOd.jpg width=700 Looking over to the Asulkan Alpine Hut, Glacier NP https://i.imgur.com/t4qDVsJ.jpg width=700 Looking down on Emerald Lake and the President and Vice President from Mt. Field, Yoho NP This is just a start of your hiking adventure. Plan early. Snow stays late in the early summer and can arrive early fall. Hope you have a great time. Dave
crosscheck 10/23/18 06:27pm RVing in Canada and Alaska
RE: Towing in snow?

We headed out of Coldstream October 2nd towing our Creekside TT up #97, eventual destination Smithers. Good time of the year to see our son's family and fish for steelhead in the Bulkley river. It's about a 12 hour trip if you take it easy. Weather generally good as there are not any real high passes to traverse. Still have summer tires on, weather good when we left. Stopped in Cache Creek and watched the south bound ice coated trucks and RV's that the hunters were driving cruising by.. Stop to talk to a Greyhound driver who had just come down from the north. His bus had a 3" coating of ice and snow on it. Said all of the semis were chaining up and he would not recommend starting off at this time as there are 2 climbs before you are up on the plateau. Looked at the weather and it said that after Lac La Hache, everything was clear even sunny. Decided to head out. Drove up to Clinton and the snow was on the ground but highway was just wet. Kept climbing until we got to Big Bar where this photo was taken. About 12" of snow in the fields and the north and southbound lanes where solid compact snow/ice. 1 1/2 hours in 4x4 at 60km/hr. Temps= -3C so the snow was a bit slick. Trucks were in the ditches all over the place because if you decided to pull over onto the paved shoulder, the snow would pull your wheels into the ditch. The ice finally turned to slush after 100 Mile House and after that , the roads where just wet. Stopped off at the Quesnel Walmart and had a nice overnight stay(-7C), then an uneventful day to Smithers. https://i.imgur.com/GgO4vrg.jpg width=700 Just near the Chasm turn off, #97. Still had the climb up to Begbie summit. Do not try this at home kids. I have driven hundreds of hours on snow covered roads but this is the first time pulling a TT and with summer tires to boot. This was no picnic. Dave Winter tires are REQUIRED by law in BC after October 1, you were taking an unecessary risk. A lot of good suggestions here, the main thing is to slow down and avoid sudden speed changes. The worst conditions are when the temperatures are close to freezing, once the weather stays cold winter conditions can actuallly be good. I have 4 good studded winter tires sitting in my shed. 30years living in the north and being prepared for winter driving has always been a priority. 13 years of living recently in the Okanagan has made my winter driving brain mushy. Lucky, it was only 1.5 hours of icy conditions compared to the total of 12. DriveBC had excellent current info that we followed. If conditions were prevelent all the way to Smithers, we would have made other plans. Luckily, the poor conditions were only a relatively short stretch. Have an appointment to change over the SUV and the truck to winter tires tomorrow. The only thing is that the long range forcast is for double digit highs for the next 2 weeks in the Okanagan. As to the OP, use the weather technology that is available to forecast where you are are towing to. Most places give you up to the minute weather and road conditions and web cams at important highway sections like mountain passes or busy corridors. Dave
crosscheck 10/10/18 08:29pm Towing
RE: Towing in snow?

We headed out of Coldstream October 2nd towing our Creekside TT up #97, eventual destination Smithers. Good time of the year to see our son's family and fish for steelhead in the Bulkley river. It's about a 12 hour trip if you take it easy. Weather generally good as there are not any real high passes to traverse. Still have summer tires on, weather good when we left. Stopped in Cache Creek and watched the south bound ice coated trucks and RV's that the hunters were driving cruising by.. Stop to talk to a Greyhound driver who had just come down from the north. His bus had a 3" coating of ice and snow on it. Said all of the semis were chaining up and he would not recommend starting off at this time as there are 2 climbs before you are up on the plateau. Looked at the weather and it said that after Lac La Hache, everything was clear even sunny. Decided to head out. Drove up to Clinton and the snow was on the ground but highway was just wet. Kept climbing until we got to Big Bar where this photo was taken. About 12" of snow in the fields and the north and southbound lanes where solid compact snow/ice. 1 1/2 hours in 4x4 at 60km/hr. Temps= -3C so the snow was a bit slick. Trucks were in the ditches all over the place because if you decided to pull over onto the paved shoulder, the snow would pull your wheels into the ditch. The ice finally turned to slush after 100 Mile House and after that , the roads where just wet. Stopped off at the Quesnel Walmart and had a nice overnight stay(-7C), then an uneventful day to Smithers. https://i.imgur.com/GgO4vrg.jpg width=700 Just near the Chasm turn off, #97. Still had the climb up to Begbie summit. Do not try this at home kids. I have driven hundreds of hours on snow covered roads but this is the first time pulling a TT and with summer tires to boot. This was no picnic. Dave
crosscheck 10/10/18 02:04pm Towing
RE: Inverter

I think that you will find that using a hair dryer is going to bleed your batteries to an unusable voltage before your lovely bride can get her hair dry no matter what you plan to use. IMHO, a small generator, or a very unhappy wife, is in your future. Running a hair dryer every third day for +- 3 minutes to dry hair from an inverter even if it is high wattage(1600w) will not run down the batteries enough to be a problem without a genny. Many of us who boondock exclusively have been doing this for years without generators. The OP has been dry camping for years. I'll put my money on Gary to use his experience in finding the right solution for his style of camping. Dave
crosscheck 10/07/18 08:22pm Technology Corner
RE: Inverter

My wife likes to shower every day when camping but doesn't wash her hair every day. As we dry camp almost exclusively, before the inverter, I had to drag the genny out each time we used the hair dryer and with other AC loads. Now with the 2000w inverter, life is easy but We still try to be carefull with our power consumption. One thing that helps is a hair dryer that has 2 settings which are 1200w high, 800w low which is below most domestic hair dryers. On the low setting, the hair still gets dry but there is less strain on the inverter especially if the batteries are near 50% or there are other smaller loads on the inverter at the same time. Or you could just ask her to stick her head out the window when under way after her shower if you don,t value your life. Dave
crosscheck 10/07/18 09:01am Technology Corner
RE: First time boondocking report

When I boondock in cold temps, I set the thermostat to 40* over night and pile on the covers. In the morning, I heat water for coffee, and the trailer is comfy in just a few minutes. My solar panels keep my batteries happy, so my limitations are tank storage and propane. The thermometers in our last and present rv's could not be set lower than 55F so just turned off the furnace and snuggled under the thick, down duvet when in cold temps over night. (not more than 10F below freezing). Never got lower than 40F inside. 10 minutes of furnace and hot water for coffee in the morning gets the TT toastie. If up at ski area and the daytime temps were around freezing, nighttime temps 20F, set furnace at 55F to keep waterlines from freezing. I carry an extra 30lb propane tank in truck box. With 490W solar, 4 6V GC-2 batts, 80gal fresh, 80gal grey, 40gal black, 2000W genny (which we never use), 2000W inverter, 3x30lb propane tanks and conservation, our limitation is just tank storage which would be offset by using shower facilities at the ski hill. Our system is more than what the OP has but I think they are on the right track for longer dry camping experiences with just a few more modifications. To conserve the limited resources you have on board is probably the most important part of dry/boondock camping if you want to camp for an extended time and there are no local services to replenish these resources. Dave
crosscheck 09/13/18 12:01pm Beginning RVing
RE: Why 4 X 4

March 1st. looking down our driveway. Average snow year. Where the truck is heading down is 16%. From the bottom, I can get maybe 50ft up the driveway in 2wd when it comes to slippery conditions.. P/U trucks even with posy trac, are are less than adequate in 2wd when you have these kind of conditions. We use our 4x4 every day of the week, for snow in winter, keep the wash board down in the summer. Like someone said, "You guys with 4x2 gotta get out a little more". Dave https://i.imgur.com/f5kZQfq.jpg width=800 We haven't even talked about hunting, fishing, trips daily up the mountain skiing, pulling TT, traveling up to a steep paragliding site. Going hiking in the mountains. Dave
crosscheck 09/05/18 11:31pm Fifth-Wheels
RE: Kananaskis Country Trip Report

We are hoping to be there next week now that the smoke has gone. Nice report. https://i.imgur.com/ST5pPFF.jpg width=800 Spray Lakes from Tent Ridge, central Kananaskis country. (near where there was a recent grizzly bear incident.) Dave
crosscheck 09/01/18 11:00am RV Parks, Campgrounds and Attractions
RE: Keeping cool while boondocking

(quote),Back on topic, it was good to be reminded of the power consumption advantages of DC fans vs AC with inverter. I bought a small DC fan with a clip mount and cigarette lighter plug at Flying J. It moves a reasonable amount of air and is quieter than the Fantastic fan. Hope the kids have a great trip! (quote) Our small 2 x 6v fans sip power even if on for the whole night. Clip them on the window valances. Keeps things bearable in fairly hot conditions(80F low). Dry camp 98.9% of the time. Almost no A/C, no genny time. Of course, you avoid unbearably hot and humid places in the summer. Dave
crosscheck 08/31/18 03:47pm Travel Trailers
RE: Weavers Needle

After you set up at Weavers Needle RV Park, for a little exercise, hike around Weaver's Needle from the Peralta trail head. https://i.imgur.com/9ENXbjF.jpg width=800 Weaver's Needle From the Peralta trail head. https://i.imgur.com/VLVSUxs.jpg width=800 Same place only from high up on the Superstition Mountain traverse. Dave
crosscheck 08/30/18 12:53pm RV Parks, Campgrounds and Attractions
RE: Keeping cool while boondocking

We have his/hers 12v fans in the bedroom plugged into cigarette lighter plugs. A bit noisy but so is truck/car traffic if close to major roads. This will cool you down but will not replace A/C. We have travelled in the tropics with our young kids and stayed in 4 walls and a light bulb places with only a ceiling fan. You do sweat, and the moving air cools you down so you can sleep. We have camped in high humidity, high heat, no fan or A/C where at 12 midnight, you lay on the bed with no covers and sweat. This is a long time ago with a TC. The 12v fans we have now are 100% better than that situation. It is all relative. Dave
crosscheck 08/29/18 01:01pm Travel Trailers
RE: Canyonlands-Capitol Reef, Worth the trip?

Capitol Reef NP, https://i.imgur.com/dASEQbQ.jpg width=800 https://i.imgur.com/hMfxOL3.jpg width=800 https://i.imgur.com/ENeSAOf.jpg width=800 https://i.imgur.com/Daz4NV1.jpg width=800 https://i.imgur.com/EXWc6ZR.jpg width=800 https://i.imgur.com/gFGTU6w.jpg width=800 https://i.imgur.com/MkjWPTS.jpg width=800 It is a little more than just a ridge. Dave
crosscheck 08/28/18 11:54pm RV Parks, Campgrounds and Attractions
RE: solar in the rain.

ISTR PT said they are amorphous and so take up more roof space than polys would. 3.3 amps is fairly useless IMO, so with the batts hungry as he says, out comes the generator. Which again goes to show that solar is just a way to increase the time between generator recharges. https://i.imgur.com/2EyEysH.jpg width=700 I made a nice fire and watched the stars. At 7600ft, it dropped down in the 20's that night and when we woke it ws 42f in the TC. We have been using the toaster every morning, the micro off and on and My DW uses her hairdryer after the daily shower plus the Feb sun is low in the sky and it is currently snowing so I have to make a confession. I had to run George the Generator for an hour before going to bed. Telescope peak seems to attract the clouds if there are any around meaning my panels were not replaceing the juice that we were using.This will be the only time that we had to use our genny.(Death Valley NP) https://i.imgur.com/KqkNclQ.jpg width=700 10 day trip to the Sunshine Coast over the July long weekend 2012 to canoe the Powell Forest canoe curcuit where it rained or was cloudy the whole time. Still waiting for our solar to let us down after 61/2 years of no generator time. Dave
crosscheck 08/26/18 10:02pm Tech Issues
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