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RE: Renogy DC-DC Test Results

Something doesn't seem right with the DC-DC charger or the measurements. In all cases it calculates out to being about 65% efficient. That is terrible efficiency, and in that case it should have been getting hot as the charger would be dissipating about 135W of waste heat.Agree on the watts in vs watts out which didn't come out as I expected. However, those were the numbers I got the way I got them. Measurements have some "internal consistency" so IMO they are ok. eg the way the engine battery voltage tapered with higher engine bay temps. I carried on after the test and recharged the batts with the converter and the Tri was working right, and I compared Tri voltage with meter voltage and came out ok. Don't know what else could be skewing things. Somebody else with a Renogy could try his numbers for a comparison. A guy in the other thread said his input amps draw was lower with fatter wire, but I did not see that at all. He has a clamp ammeter while I have an old time car dash type, but it showed 30 amps and wasn't stuck needled. Beats me.I agree with FWC, something is wrong with your readings and/or your installation if your 20a Renogy dc to dc charger continues to draw 30a regardless what size cable you use. 30a is the absolute max current the input of a 20a Renogy dc to dc charger can pull---worst case. 30a tells me you have a very large voltage drop on the input to your 20a Renogy dc to dc charger. I'd guess-estimate you have at least a 1-2v voltage drop to force 30a. If you're willing to get that voltage drop down to less than .3v, you will see the input current to your dc to dc charger drop to less than 22-23a (with 20a on the output). Of course, if you're happy with 50% conversion efficiency you can certainly leave things the way they are.
otrfun 06/22/21 04:11pm Tech Issues
RE: Insurance!

Your camper is in a grey area. No valid VIN, so it's kinda viewed by most insurance companies as a "camper shell" or accessory. A camper shell (and accessories) is/are covered by the TV's insurance up to a set limit specified in the policy---as long as it is attached to your TV. If your truck camper is at or under that limit then you should be good. If it's higher, then IMO your only option is to establish a new, valid VIN (following procedures defined by your state of residence) and insure it through Progressive, GEICO, etc. I believe you just rebuilt your camper. In your mind you have an idea what your camper is worth after this rebuild. I think it would be prudent to make sure whatever insurance company you insure it with concurs with what you think it's worth. Lastly, I'd take any advice an insurance agent offers to you with a grain of salt. As boring and frustrating as it is, your best recourse is to read your insurance policy. Generally speaking, unless a policy specifically excludes coverage for a given situation, the odds are somewhat in your favor that you're covered.
otrfun 06/20/21 07:49am Truck Campers
RE: Seeking refrigerator tips... in AZ and heat is hampering...

Many times these fridges are not installed correctly to begin with. The specs call for no more than a certain space in front of the cooling fins, this is so that as air moves up it actually goes thru the fins. If the space it too large then air goes past the fins and does not cool them enough. I have added a deflector to mine that forces air closer to the fins. And if is really hot I will set a fan pointing towards the bottom and remove both upper and lower vent covers. Shade is a must as well.Yup, good point. On many units the entire rear baffle needs to be about an inch away from all the rear coils. Having the entire baffle that close actually improves air movement due to the venturi effect. One would think more space would be better, but not the case.
otrfun 06/18/21 08:59am Tech Issues
RE: Seeking refrigerator tips... in AZ and heat is hampering...

Exterior fans will help. We've found it improves cooling about 2-4 degrees when ambient temps are really high. We've camped in 110+ AZ heat many times. Even a perfectly operating propane frig with double exterior fans will have trouble maintaining 40 degrees in this kind of heat. If you access the frig more than once every 2-3 hours during the heat of the day you'll be lucky to stay below 45.
otrfun 06/18/21 08:26am Tech Issues
RE: why i call Li fussy

LifeBlue sells heated 100ah/200ah/300ah LifePo4 batteries. This LifeBlue 100ah heated battery sells for $870 (no tax and free shipping). Along with a 6a heater, it also has built-in bluetooth, a data port for BMS updates, a reset button and 5/10 year warranty. LifeBlue has been out a number of years and seem to have a good rep. We were going to purchase two of these before we decided to build our own 200ah LifePo4 battery pack. Larry at LifeBlue has many, many years of solar experience and know these batteries well.
otrfun 06/16/21 11:19am Tech Issues
RE: Couple of questions about DC-Dc charging

I will be sizing cable based on the total length out and back of both + and - runs. If the length from starting battery to DCDC is 30 ft I will use 60ft as my length... Is this correct?Although Renogy doesn't specifically say so, their cable recommendation chart is based on the one-way distance (not round-trip). If you use 30 ft of cable for the positive run, and 30 ft. of cable for the negative, your total one-way distance is 30 ft. FWIW, if the Renogy chart was based on the RT distance it would prohibit installation in many trucks with TT's/5r's/TC's. It took almost 15ft. of cable just to get from our battery to the very front of our truck bed. If your TV has a substantial enough negative/ground cable, you can use the frame for most of your negative run. That's what we did with our install. We ran 20-25 ft. of positive cable, then approx. 5 ft of cable for the negative run from the frame to the truck camper located in the bed of our truck. Our 40a Renogy's input load reading of 43.5a and output of 40a confirmed that we had a good install (minimal voltage drop).
otrfun 06/13/21 11:55am Tech Issues
RE: Couple of questions about DC-Dc charging

thanks for posting that picture, that is exactly what I needed to see. they are specking a non critical volatage drop of 3 - 10% so of course the more the voltage drops the more the input current is going to raise to acomadate the lower supplied voltage. if we size the cable runs with a <1% voltage drop then you should only have an increase slightly above the efficiencey of the dc to dc charger. I am not worried to much about my altanatore on its output but rather on heat and the amount of use. I idealy want to size the load at 30% but weather that would be possible depends on the actual usage at 60 amps I am sitting at 38% , at 50 amps I am at 31%and at 45 amps I am at 28% so that is great and means I can go with the 40 amp charger no problem. SteveYou're welcome! I was shocked when I saw the 3-10% non-critical voltage drop comment. A 10% voltage drop is huge. Good idea to strive for a <1% voltage drop!! That's what you gotta do if you want to get the best conversion efficiency. We didn't quite get there with our install, but we got close. I give Renogy kudos for their dc to dc charger's ability to handle low input voltages. However, I think they should make it much more clear the downsides to operating a dc to dc charger this way. Good luck with your install!
otrfun 06/13/21 11:51am Tech Issues
RE: Couple of questions about DC-Dc charging

did you measure that reduction in amprage or is that a calculated value? I have been going back and forth between the 20 amp and 40 amp renogy, so I am curious about the effect of cable size to the load SteveBoth. Based on my 2 gauge install vs. two folks I know that installed 40a Renogy's using 4 gauge in their 5th wheels. Current was measured on all (clamp-on ammeter), but each installation had a different run length (20-30 ft.). Not an ideal comparison, but it did give me a rough idea. Renogy's input cable recommendations (specifically those at/near the maximum recommended run length of 30 ft.) seem to result in the input load being at or near 150% of the output current (i.e, 20a charger output, 30a input; 40a output, 60a input; 60a output, 90a input). I have not confirmed this with the cable gauges specified for the 10 and 20 ft. runs. If you're at all concerned about loading your alternator too much, I would highly recommend going at least one gauge larger (physically) than what Renogy recommends. This should drop the input load down to <125% (based on max 30 ft. run length). At the top of the Renogy page, you'll notice the Renogy manual recommends this in a roundabout way ("larger wire sizes generally improve performance"). BTW, I downloaded this screenshot from the Renogy website today (version 1.4). Some of the cable gauge recommendations are different from the version NRALIFR uploaded (I can only assume he uploaded an older version). We were going back and forth between the 40a and 60a Renogy (we have a 220a alternator). Knowing what I know now, I probably would have gone with the 60a Renogy vs. the 40a. If we had used 2 gauge, or even 1 gauge, cable (20-25 ft run) with a 60a Renogy, I believe we could have reduced the input load to less than 70a. Our input load with our 40a Renogy using 2 gauge (20-25 ft. run) is 43.5a. Lastly, if you're loading your alternator on the edge of its capability, don't count on a fuse to be some kind of current regulator. I've witnessed a number of fuses support 125-150% of their rated current before opening. I would only count on a fuse to protect your TV and Renogy in the event of a catastrophic short. https://i.imgur.com/xiLtyoQl.jpg
otrfun 06/12/21 02:39pm Tech Issues
RE: Couple of questions about DC-Dc charging

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otrfun 06/11/21 05:55pm Tech Issues
RE: Couple of questions about DC-Dc charging

You're correct. I miss-spoke slightly on the Renogy cable requirement for the 40a. My apologies. By the way, did you see the "Notice" at the bottom of the Renogy pic you posted? When charging converter is sending full charge, the amperage consumption will be 50% greater on the input side. I believe this confirms what I've been saying about the Renogy dc to dc charger all along---that it *wastes* current. Contrary to your claim it doesn't. 50% greater than 40a is 60a. This concurs with the current measurements I observed with my friend's 40a Renogy dc to dc charger install. I never suggested, implied, or tried to convince you in any way that you should use 2 gauge cable with your Redarc. My focus has ONLY been the Renogy's lack of conversion efficiency ("wasted" current)---nothing more, nothing less. You said the Renogy did not waste current, I said it did. In any case, by your own admission you don't know what amperage your dc to dc charger is pulling, and don't care. I do care and regularly make current measurements to make sure all my various loads remain within tolerance. As such, my comments and observations are based on realworld measurements that I've personally made. With all due respect, sometimes it's difficult to appreciate something unless you see it with your own eyes. For what it's worth, I've personally found a clamp-on ammeter to be a very useful and enlightening tool.No problem, I posted that screenshot specifically because of how the data was formatted in that particular field. I think most people at first glance (me included) would look at that and only see the “4” in the top line, and not go any further. And yes, I did see the notice and intentionally didn’t crop it out. The inputs on my charger are fused at 60 amps as well. Renogy claims their charger efficiency is “Up to 90%”. If Redarc publishes the efficiency of their DC chargers, I haven’t found it. Actually, I would be happy to measure the input amps on my charger for you. I should have had a clamp meter in my hands a few weeks ago for another project where I was interested in the DC amps that were above the range of my Fluke. I ended up getting misdirected by Amazon’s endless presentation of “similar” meters though, and got distracted by some accessories that came with the meter I ordered. When it arrived, I found out that I had ordered a clamp meter that could do everything very well……..except the one thing I was ordering a clamp meter for in the first place; measuring DC current. :S I should get another one soon. :):)I appreciate your offer to measure your Redarc's input current for me, NRALIFR; however, it's not necessary. I believe you'll find the measurements much more enlightening then I would. Helped a serious off-roading friend of mine in AZ install one last year. He uses it to power some important gear so we tested it every which way possible. Excellent unit for off-road use. Hopefully this discussion didn't scare off any potential Renogy dc to dc charger owners. For the record, we're *completely* happy with our Renogy 40a dc to dc charger. A *lot* of performance for the money. We just got back from a 3,000 mi. trip through the SW US. Temps were already over 100+ in some areas. We regularly use our LifePo4 battery pack to power our a/c unit during our 30-45 min. breaks while we're on the road. After each break, the Renogy was tasked with charging the batteries back to 100%, which typically took 1-2 hours. All said and done, I'd say we had the Renogy producing its full-rated output of 40a for at least 20-25 hours during this trip. Worked flawlessly!
otrfun 06/11/21 03:32pm Tech Issues
RE: Couple of questions about DC-Dc charging

Actually, Renogy recommends 4-2 awg wire on the input side for that length of run. Since your friend’s circuit length is at the outer end of the range, I’d probably have chosen the 2 gauge wire as well. The data in the box I circled is formatted a little hokey because the font is too large, but that’s what it’s trying to convey. If you feel the case of a 40a Renogy while it's converting such a low voltage you'll be firm believer it is using 10-20a of current to pull off this conversion. The case gets *very* hot while both fans run full-on. Also, let's not forget the current consumed by the 1.3v voltage drop created by the cable, terminals, and fuses. It all adds up. These DC chargers aren’t all created equal. My Redarc doesn’t run that hot at all. Not even close. Warm is the hottest it ever gets. And, it doesn’t even have fans. It’s rated to run in environments exposed to high heat (over 50° higher than the Renogy) and open weather. I could have installed it on the frame rail of the truck if that’s where it would work best. Maybe there’s a reason why the Redarc products all cost so much more than the Renogy products. Folks have no choice but to use the proper gauge cables with their inverters. Use too small of cable with your inverter it simply shuts down. Not the case with a dc to dc chargers. They will silently ramp up current draw until either your fuse or alternator gives up the ghost. That’s not quite true, they all have upper and lower voltage limits. I don’t know about Renogy or Victron chargers, but the closer you get to the lower voltage limit with the Redarc, the less amount of time it will stay engaged. It will drop offline on its own. I’d at least consider that there may be something wrong with your friend’s charger contributing to the “wasted current”. You’ll never convince me that using 2 awg wire on MY install would result in anything more that an insignificant amount of gain. Had Redarc recommended 2 gauge wire, of course I would have used it. But they didn’t, and I see no reason to use your friend’s install as the yardstick for what I should have done with mine. :):)You're correct. I miss-spoke slightly on the Renogy cable requirement for the 40a. My apologies. By the way, did you see the "Notice" at the bottom of the Renogy pic you posted? When charging converter is sending full charge, the amperage consumption will be 50% greater on the input side. I believe this confirms what I've been saying about the Renogy dc to dc charger all along---that it *wastes* current. Contrary to your claim it doesn't. 50% greater than 40a is 60a. This concurs with the current measurements I observed with my friend's 40a Renogy dc to dc charger install. I never suggested, implied, or tried to convince you in any way that you should use 2 gauge cable with your Redarc. My focus has ONLY been the Renogy's lack of conversion efficiency ("wasted" current)---nothing more, nothing less. You said the Renogy did not waste current, I said it did. In any case, by your own admission you don't know what amperage your dc to dc charger is pulling, and don't care. I do care and regularly make current measurements to make sure all my various loads remain within tolerance. As such, my comments and observations are based on realworld measurements that I've personally made. With all due respect, sometimes it's difficult to appreciate something unless you see it with your own eyes. For what it's worth, I've personally found a clamp-on ammeter to be a very useful and enlightening tool.
otrfun 06/11/21 11:17am Tech Issues
RE: Couple of questions about DC-Dc charging

If the DC-DC draws 60 to make 40 so 20 is "wasted", and you can change that to 45 to make 40 so only 5 is "wasted", how does this help with charging the batteries? You still have the 40 max output. I suppose you save some gas for the truck while driving when the alternator is not working so hard, don't know how much that would be . . . . Agree, it doesn't speed-up the charging process. However, if you were an alternator you might buy me a beer for making your day a little easier--lol!
otrfun 06/11/21 09:47am Tech Issues
RE: Soft start for ac

Will be dry camping next Feb in key west Florida so obviously will need AC. I have on board generator plus two Honda 2000s that can be hooked together, however they take up slot of space and my 3500 generator weighs to much for me to lift alone. The on board is propane and to refill would require breaking down camp to get refilled. Am considering a soft start for the AC. I am a single woman camper with little electrical knowledge. Who or were would I get to install this and is it worth the money?Hhmm . . . dry camping in Key West? Any chance it's Sigsbee or Trumbo? Feb temps in Key West are typically in the mid-70's during the day, mid/low 60's at night. Granted, having a/c when it's in the mid 70's is nice, but not IMO not essential. A couple of fans might suffice. I've owned/installed a number of Micro Air Easy Starts. They absolutely, 100% work as advertised and worth every penny. You can run 95% of the 13.5 - 15k RV a/c units out there with a single Honda EU2000/2200 generator with a Micro Air installed. Without, you may run 10-15% of them. As for the installation, you may find the install a bit intimidating if you have little electrical/mechanical experience. I'd suggest a having someone with some good electrical/mechanical skills on standby just in case. No need to pay big $$ for an HVAC guy. The install only requires splicing/rerouting 4 or 5 wires and mounting the Micro Air box. Enjoy Key West! We hope to make it there in Jan!
otrfun 06/11/21 09:34am Tech Issues
RE: Couple of questions about DC-Dc charging

. . . If your friend’s wires are heating to the point where they’re burning off ~15 amps of current, he should probably be looking for materials and/or workmanship problems with his install. I don’t believe the wire gauge difference from 4 to 2 or your shorter circuit length can account for all of that.I've done a bit of informal testing of our Renogy 40a dc to dc charger with an adjustable power supply. I think you'd be surprised with the conversion losses when you start dropping input voltage. The whole point of my last post was to show that voltage drop resulting from undersized cables, combined with conversions losses as the dc to dc charger tries to compensate for this voltage drop, uses (wastes) a lot of current. The current losses my friend experienced with his 40a Renogy dc to dc charger is par for the course---nothing unusual or wrong with his installation. The 30 ft. of 4 gauge cable he used was the gauge and maximum run length Renogy recommended for the 40a Renogy. Also interesting to note that Renogy recommends the use of a 60a fuse for this particular length/gauge---which just so happens to be very close to the current my friend's Renogy consumes. If you calculate the standard voltage drop for 30 ft. of 4 gauge cable with a 60a load, you'll find it's almost 1.0v. The use of terminals and fuses add even more losses, let's say 1.3v. Even if you have good alternator voltage, say 14.0v., right out of the gate your dc to dc charger is only working with 12.7v. It ramps up current draw significantly to compensate. If you feel the case of a 40a Renogy while it's converting such a low voltage you'll be firm believer it is using 10-20a of current to pull off this conversion. The case gets *very* hot while both fans run full-on. Also, let's not forget the current consumed by the 1.3v voltage drop created by the cable, terminals, and fuses. It all adds up. Folks have no choice but to use the proper gauge cables with their inverters. Use too small of cable with your inverter it simply shuts down. Not the case with a dc to dc chargers. They will silently ramp up current draw until either your fuse or alternator gives up the ghost. Even though I have a 220a alternator in my truck, I still played it safe. I spent an extra $30 for 2 gauge cable and reduced the load on my alternator by at least 10-15a. $30 very well spent in my book.
otrfun 06/11/21 08:09am Tech Issues
RE: Couple of questions about DC-Dc charging

Most of the Renogy dc to dc charger cable recommendations result in a 25-50% alternator load penalty. For instance, based on their recommendations, their 40a dc to dc charger at full output would result in a 50-60a load on the alternator. In effect, you end up "wasting" 10-20a of alternator output. Nothing is “wasted”. The DC-DC charger boosts the voltage from what’s available (which will ALWAYS be lower at the end of those 23 ft cables than what you measured at the alternator) to what is needed by the charger based on which charging stage it’s in. It does that by drawing more amps. There are always conversion losses, but it is NOT wasting 10-20 amps of alternator output. The cable run from our truck battery to our 40a dc to dc charger mounted in our truck camper was approx. 23 ft. Renogy recommends 4 gauge for this particular run. We used 2 gauge instead. With a 40a output from the dc to dc charger, our alternator only incurs a 43.5a load (8-9% load penalty). Alternator output voltage was 14.1v at the time we took this current reading. While the higher gauge wires certainly don’t hurt, assuming the 4 gauge wires were capable of carrying the maximum amperage for the length of your circuit, up-sizing them to 2 gauge isn’t what’s responsible for what you are calling the “8-9% load penalty”. The alternator voltage being as high as it was at the time (14.1) was responsible for that. If the DC charger was in bulk or boost mode, it only needed to raise the voltage to 14.6, so it did that by drawing more amps. Referencing the DC charger’s output voltage to the alternator output voltage is irrelevant anyway. The DC charger should be connected to your starting battery, not the alternator. What matters to the DC charger is what the voltage is at it’s input terminals. What matters to the alternator is the voltage it’s sensing of the starting battery. The DC charger is just another electrical load on the starting battery. If the voltage at the DC charger’s input terminals drops to 13 volts or even lower, but it needs to be in boost mode for the camper battery (which is going to happen at some point), it’s going to draw as much current as it needs to raise the voltage to 14.6. We chose to mount/use a battery isolator next to the Renogy dc to dc charger in our truck camper vs. running a 20-25 ft. sensing wire from the dc to dc charger in our TC to the truck's engine bay. Another added benefit of mounting the battery isolator in the TC (vs. the truck) is zero parasitic current when the TC is disconnected/off-loaded from the truck. There is no parasitic current from the camper battery to the DC charger when the TC is disconnected from the truck. There IS a less than 0.4 amp idle current draw of the charger FROM the truck starter battery when the TC is connected to the truck. That’s why you either run a long D+ sensing wire all the way to the truck (which would be foolish, imho) or you run the +12v input wire to the charger through an ignition switched constant-duty solenoid or some other such device mounted in the truck, and connect the D+ sense wire directly to the DC charger’s + input terminal. :):)Using less than ideal (physically smaller) gauge cable on the input of a dc to dc charger does several things: 1) It increases voltage drop, resistance, and heat. Heat is a sure sign you're wasting current. 2) This voltage drop also forces the dc to dc charger input to increase current draw to compensate for the voltage drop. This increase in current creates even more heat. Unfortunately, all necessary evils in order to maintain a given voltage/current on the output. A lose, lose domino effect which degrades the overall efficiency and performance of the dc to dc charger. Yes, alternator voltage also plays a part. However, what good is good alternator voltage if it's strangled and reduced by undersized cabling. Anyhow, to get past all this conjecture, here's some realworld numbers. A friend of ours used a 30 ft. run of 4 gauge cable for his 5th wheel Renogy 40a dc to dc charger install. With his Renogy producing its rated output of 40a (14.4v bulk mode), it was drawing nearly 60a (current measured at the truck's battery terminal; alternator voltage was hovering around 13.9 - 14.1v). There was almost a 1.0v voltage drop measured between the battery terminal and input to the Renogy. That's a significant voltage drop which surely played big part in the almost 20a current differential between the input and output. No doubt that 20a was spent heating the cable and the Renogy's heat sinks. If this isn't "wasted" current I don't know what is. In contrast, we elected to use almost 23 ft of 2 gauge cable for our Renogy 40a dc to dc charger. We have the same truck and alternator BTW (with similar alternator voltage under load). With our Renogy producing its rated 40a of charge current (14.4v bulk mode), it only drew a 43.5a load at the battery terminal while only incurring a .35v voltage drop (between the battery terminal and the Renogy input). So, all said and done, I used 43.5a to get 40a of charge current (using 2 gauge cable). My friend used almost 60a to get 40a (using 4 gauge cable). (*) Quoting you: "Nothing is "wasted"" by using 4 gauge cable vs. 2 gauge cable. Based on the above 16.5a current differential, I couldn't disagree with you more. Lastly, I never mentioned anything about parasitic current from our dc to dc charger. I was referencing our battery isolator's parasitic current. Our BI's parasitic current is approx. 250-500ma with the relay closed and approx. 50ma open. With the battery isolator mounted on the truck camper, parasitic current is only applied to the truck when the truck camper is electrically connected to the truck. With the BI mounted on the truck it presents parasitic 24/7. Although 50ma is a small amount, it could become an issue for long-term storage (36ah a month plus the truck's own parasitic). :):) (*) Yes, our cable run was approx. 7 ft. shorter. Rather doubt that alone made up for the 16.5a difference, however. Even if it did, then it just adds more creedence to my position that cable size, length, voltage drop, resistance, etc. does matter.
otrfun 06/10/21 01:29pm Tech Issues
RE: Couple of questions about DC-Dc charging

My Renogy DCDC which I haven’t installed yet says input amps are 1.3 x output amps so 60 amp draw for a 40 amp output charger. The charger is an isolator as well so you don’t need a solenoid or another isolator between the starting battery and the house batteries . . . Most of the Renogy dc to dc charger cable recommendations result in a 25-50% alternator load penalty. For instance, based on their recommendations, their 40a dc to dc charger at full output would result in a 50-60a load on the alternator. In effect, you end up "wasting" 10-20a of alternator output. The cable run from our truck battery to our 40a dc to dc charger mounted in our truck camper was approx. 23 ft. Renogy recommends 4 gauge for this particular run. We used 2 gauge instead. With a 40a output from the dc to dc charger, our alternator only incurs a 43.5a load (8-9% load penalty). Alternator output voltage was 14.1v at the time we took this current reading. We chose to mount/use a battery isolator next to the Renogy dc to dc charger in our truck camper vs. running a 20-25 ft. sensing wire from the dc to dc charger in our TC to the truck's engine bay. Another added benefit of mounting the battery isolator in the TC (vs. the truck) is zero parasitic current when the TC is disconnected/off-loaded from the truck.
otrfun 06/09/21 08:34pm Tech Issues
RE: Inverter Will Not Start A/C Compressor w/Micro Air Installed

No voltage drop issues: 12.6v at inverter input under 120a load. Our battery bank consists of a 200ah Lifepo4 battery pack with a 200a BMS.Aren't Li's wonderful?Yes, they are! Just love their stability and linearity when discharged under heavy load.
otrfun 06/04/21 05:15pm Tech Issues
RE: Inverter Will Not Start A/C Compressor w/Micro Air Installed

Have not recommended Xantrex for at least a decade.The Xantrex Prowatt SW2000 did serve us well for 2 years powering our laptops, satellite, microwave, etc. However, it's inability to feed our Micro Air with a clean, pure sine wave, at slightly under its continuous rating, was disappointing.
otrfun 06/04/21 05:14pm Tech Issues
Inverter Will Not Start A/C Compressor w/Micro Air Installed

Just an FYI for anyone having problems starting the compressor on their Micro Air Easy Start equipped a/c unit with their inverter. It may not always be a current/voltage issue. Even though our Xantrex Prowatt SW2000 inverter met all the continuous/inrush/LRA current and voltage needs of our 11k BTU Dometic Penguin II with the Micro Air Easy Start installed, it would not start the compressor. The Xantrex is rated at 1800w/15a continuous, 3000w/25a surge. The 11k BTU Dometic Penguin II requires 9-11a continuous. Inrush/LRA is only 14.6a with the Micro Air installed. No voltage drop issues: 12.6v at inverter input under 120a load. Our battery bank consists of a 200ah Lifepo4 battery pack with a 200a BMS. Talked to Micro Air. Their engineer said the Xantrex may be distorting the waveform under load causing the Micro Air to fault just when it attempts to start the compressor. Wasn't able to confirm this with a scope, but it seems like a reasonable assumption. The Micro Air operates just fine on shore and generator power. We replaced the Xantrex with an Aims 2000 watt pure sine wave inverter. The Aims powers our a/c compressor flawlessly. Performed repeated compressor start/stops. Also, ran the compressor continuously (via battery) for 30-60 min. at a time. Zero issues.
otrfun 06/04/21 09:03am Tech Issues
RE: Ram 3500 truck bed

What kind of truck camper do you have? The bed pan on the Megacab dually is the same bed pan used on a Ram 2500/3500 short bed. Don't recall hearing any complaints about lack of support near the wheel wells from any Ram HD shortbed owners who carry truck campers.
otrfun 05/31/21 03:36pm Truck Campers
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