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RE: Michelin's replacement for 225/75 16 LTX M/S2 ?

The Thor 22e Freedom Elite is rather light RV. The Michelin LT MS-2's that were the factory tires lasted for 42,000 miles. I too wanted to replace them with the same tire. Research and found the MS-2's and the Defender were discontinued and the replacement tire is the Michelin LT Agilis Cross climate. These were my choice for the replacement. As for these Hankook tires. As I said,they are new factory installed tires so we'll see what happens. DW and I are leaving for a 4/5 month crosscounty trip. From the East coast to the desert southwest then zig-zag North and back home eventually. I figure about 10 to 12,000 miles. We'll see how they look after that run. I wonder why the Michelin website still shows the Defender?
pnichols 03/02/21 09:48am Class C Motorhomes
RE: Michelin's replacement for 225/75 16 LTX M/S2 ?

My OEM Michelin's are 6 years old and ozone cracks are appearing. Only 18,000 miles on them, but I am looking into getting new ones later this year regardless. I did some searching and didn't see the Michelin LTX M/S2 LR E 16 listed anywhere. Did they discontinue them and if so, with what? I think the tire on the left in the link below is the replacement for the earlier LTX M/S 2 LR E 16 Michelin tire that used to come stock on so many Class C motorhomes: https://www.michelinman.com/tires/defender-family.html I currently have six of these (plus the spare) on our E450 24 ft. Class C, except in size 215/85R16 LR E which is a larger diameter tire to provide a little more ground clearance.
pnichols 02/28/21 10:20am Class C Motorhomes
RE: Nomadland

Thanks , I felt about the same way. Looking forward to a long trip probably 6 -8 months, but not gonna sell the old homestead. Need to have a place to come home to.... Easy to plan but I know my plans are not the ones that count. Probably off-topic a bit ... but your comment above "Easy to plan but I know my plans are not the ones that count" ... for some reason reminded me of this famous statement by Albert Einstein: "What counts can’t always be counted; what can be counted doesn’t always count." :)
pnichols 02/25/21 09:00pm RV Lifestyle
RE: Best Cell Phone App

In addition to our phones and excellent Garmin navigator, when traveling in the Western U.S. we always try to carry along several of these to cover each state we might wind-up in. They are excellent - and well worth the money: https://www.benchmarkmaps.com/atlas I'm curious ... my phone has a huge storage memory (256GB) and as I understand it ... full GPS capability. When is SOMEONE going to come out with a super great navigation phone app (doesn't have to be free), that can hold an entire U.S. roads updateable database (updates don't have to be free) in phones with large storage capacity ... that DOES NOT need to have Internet access in order to navigate? It seems like many of today's modern phones could be programmed and otherwise equipped to on demand perform just like (or better than) a non-Internet-connected navigation unit. :h
pnichols 02/22/21 11:13am Beginning RVing
RE: Nomadland

We just watched it last evening. The DW and myself are retired and use our RV only a few times a year for true recreational purposes - not having to live in it as our home. We had mixed fealings about what the movie was intended to convey to us about that kind of lifestyle. We really felt quite "sad" after watching it. Mostly sad for the situations that the characters found themselves in, even though many appeared to be enjoying themselves some of the time. We have camped at Quartzsite a few times and of course hence camped around some folks that probably were in the very life situations depicted in the movie. During our two longest RV trips of 9 and 10 weeks we did get into the feeling of being "free nomads" and it was wonderful for a bit during those short periods. At the end of both trips we were glad we had a home base to return to ... but our home is in a natural setting equal to many of the beautiful places where we camped on those trips. Here's a bunch of reviews on it ... that are all over the map: https://www.imdb.com/title/tt9770150/reviews?ref_=tt_urv
pnichols 02/20/21 10:58pm RV Lifestyle
RE: Best Cell Phone App

Doesn't WAZE requie Internet access? If so, it's of no use in many places in the western U.S. where we travel. We prefer complete independence from the Internet, so we use detailed map atlas books and our satellite-based Garmin unit with it's free updates so we can keep it always up to date for free.
pnichols 02/19/21 11:08pm Beginning RVing
RE: It might begin very soon

Well ... as an example to all complex-technology trusters out there, here's a harmless failure mode that happened last night to my daughter's fairly modern "slightly high tech" Lexus SUV: It was just sitting in the driveway in the dark outside of her home when an electrical equipment failure began. Every 2-3 minutes it's rear hatch would open and the interior lights would come on. After a few seconds the hatch would close and the lights would go out. This strange failure cycle lasted who knows how long into the night, as she had to get some sleep so she could use a borrowed vehicle to go into work today. Self-driving technology only belongs in freight trains - not in airplanes or public road vehicles. Not all gadgets that work for the good of some work for the good of all. Here's an addition to my post above: I just finished research on my daughter's "mysterious self-opening" rear hatch problem on her Lexus SUV. It appears that many others have had this happen, and on other vehicle models too, and of course on garage door openers. Soooo ... I guess we (not me) should trust the way, way, way more complex self-driving systems eventually deployed in everyday run-around vehicles all over the world? I think not.
pnichols 02/14/21 02:41pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Ev charging in camps expectation of availability, cost

I wonder when campgrounds without hookups are going to start relaxing generator hours so campers can use their generators to recharge their EVs? RV generators seem to me to be an obvious piece of equipment to use for charging EVs when drycamping.
pnichols 02/12/21 12:10pm General RVing Issues
RE: It might begin very soon

Well ... as an example to all complex-technology trusters out there, here's a harmless failure mode that happened last night to my daughter's fairly modern "slightly high tech" Lexus SUV: It was just sitting in the driveway in the dark outside of her home when an electrical equipment failure began. Every 2-3 minutes it's rear hatch would open and the interior lights would come on. After a few seconds the hatch would close and the lights would go out. This strange failure cycle lasted who knows how long into the night, as she had to get some sleep so she could use a borrowed vehicle to go into work today. Self-driving technology only belongs in freight trains - not in airplanes or public road vehicles. Not all gadgets that work for the good of some work for the good of all.
pnichols 02/11/21 11:43am Tow Vehicles
RE: It might begin very soon

Scarry is right!! Imagine how full of integrated circuits, complex mechanical components, and communications equipment (for Internet and/or satellite connectivity) ... those trucks will be full of. All of tlhat can, and will, fail here and there over time. I hope that transportation regulations require those trucks to be clearly marked - including distinctive night lighting - so that the rest of us can stay well away from them on the highways. P.S. Maybe I spent too many years working in the integrated circuits industry and too many hours watching those cable reality shows about big rig accident disasters in Alaska - most which have nothing to do with human error - but can be blamed on 80,000 lbs. of freight inter-acting with the laws of physics. Someday in the near future we will think it's scary when a human is behind the wheel. "What if the driver falls asleep?" "What if the driver is not paying attention or has a medical problem" Dan Well ... there is one big and very important difference between a human truck driver and a technology truck driver: A human truck driver has an ultimately selfish reason to not want to get into, or cause, an accident involving what he's riding in. It's called self preservation. I don't think a bundle of technology is self-aware enough to be concerned with preserving itself. Software, integrated circuits, engine control modules, accelerometers, braking systems, tire pressure monitoring systems, steering mechanisms, pattern recognition image capture systems, satellite/Internet antennas, etc., etc. ... could care less about what happens to themselves resulting from "not paying attention" or "errors in judgement" that they might make.
pnichols 02/10/21 11:45am Tow Vehicles
RE: It might begin very soon

Scarry is right!! Imagine how full of integrated circuits, complex mechanical components, and communications equipment (for Internet and/or satellite connectivity) ... those trucks will be full of. All of tlhat can, and will, fail here and there over time. I hope that transportation regulations require those trucks to be clearly marked - including distinctive night lighting - so that the rest of us can stay well away from them on the highways. P.S. Maybe I spent too many years working in the integrated circuits industry and too many hours watching those cable reality shows about big rig accident disasters in Alaska - most which have nothing to do with human error - but can be blamed on 80,000 lbs. of freight inter-acting with the laws of physics.
pnichols 02/08/21 06:25pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Spare on Class C

For you folks who want to start carrying a spare for their Class C, but also want to maybe carry along something else that requires use of the rear hitch ... you might want to consider a front hitch, in addition to the one in the back. My preference would be to add a front hitch so as to either A) not have to carry a heavy thing that mounts in the back hitch or, B) not have to use a long hitch extension in the back that sticks out quite a bit for the carrying of two things. For a Class C, too much weight way at the back hanging off the hitch can negatively affect steering.
pnichols 02/05/21 05:26pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Download speed varies

Gary, after reading all of the above, I'm betting that your speed fall-offs have nothing to do with any routing issues. It's probably that the main Internet speed coming from your provider is falling off whenever too many folks around you using the same provider are online - just like the average 120 Mbps from my provider can drop down to 50-60 Mbps whenever too many of my neighbors are streaming from the same provider. OP has DSL, sounds like you have Cable Internet.. Not the same at all. Now with Cable Internet, that IS a different beast, Cable company uses large long "loops" of cable, puts bunches of folks on each loop.. Cable Internet can suffer from over crowding on the loops as more and more folks get on which will indeed slow down the Internet access for all on that loop.. OP has verified via a direct hardwired connection that their DSL modem/router IS getting the speed that they are paying for and the Phone company was to provide. The OPs issue is not the phone company's side, it is something wrong with their router/ Wifi access point which is built into the phone company provided DSL modem/router/WiFi access point.. Phone company is sending them a replacement modem/router. "DSL, absolutely no one "shares" the OPs line, it goes all the way back to the phone Co's central office. The central office then connects the OPs line to the Internet." So .... that central office's particular connection to the Internet is never overloaded due to too many DSL users (now working and/or schooling from home) being serviced by that particular central office??
pnichols 02/05/21 12:52pm Technology Corner
RE: Class C Motorhome With My Wishlist

I am look for a class C motorhome around 24-25 feet with the following: queen walk-around bed large dinette full size overhead bunk bathroom sink with counter dual fridge (gas + electric) gas oven 3 burner stove electric steps electric awning double kitchen sink diesel engine Do you know if such a thing exists or anything close to this? Thanks, Joe Joe, this may be pretty close to what you want, except for a diesel engine - check out the 22M model: https://www.winnebago.com/models/product/motorhomes/class-c/minnie-winnie
pnichols 02/04/21 08:45pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: RV Lithium Lite & Lithium Super Upgrade Systems - Mike Mas

Phil, Nice find. I'm considering 270 amp-hour SiO2--but they might be pretty heavy, so it may be best to stay with 100 amp-hour jars. Li doesn't have that sort of weight constraint, which is a feature I had not thought of before. Don, Also note down aways on the page in the link I gave ... that their 200 AH Group 31 lithium battery still has about 70% of it's capacity at -4 degrees F. I wonder how they pulled that off? Internal heating?
pnichols 02/04/21 08:08pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: RV Lithium Lite & Lithium Super Upgrade Systems - Mike Mas

Hello Forum Users - I just completed my 2nd “Independent” In-Depth film on upgrading an RV to Lithium Power and wanted to share it with the forum. On my most recent film, I designed two different systems for RV’s titled; "Lithium Lite" and "Lithium Super". The “Lithium Lite” system is based on a 300 amp hour system with 3,800 watts of capacity which essentially replaces and doubles the power of most RV’s AGM batteries. This system is ideal for smaller RV’s such as B, B+ and Class C RV’s. The "Lithium Super” is a Powerhouse System which uses a 625 amp hour battery with 8,064 watts hour capacity which allows the entire coach to be run totally on lithium power, to even include the roof air conditioner for up to 8-10 hrs at a 50% cycle. This system also offers expansion to 1250 amp hours. My design includes moving the house batteries (now lithium) from their past “open air” compartment, where the batteries were exposed to extreme temperatures, road dust, water & salt spray, to the opposite side of the coach, to a larger sealed compartment which is temperature controlled. This compartment also houses the inverter, BMS, solar controller and battery isolator, to allow very short cable runs for near zero loss. This unique design captures “Free Heat” generated from the inverter and a neighboring AquaHot compartment to supplement the lithium batteries internal self-heating system to provider power saving and uninterrupted operation during freezing temperatures. I hope you enjoy the film - Mike Mas Please click on the link below for the video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k2RilLqYE5c&feature=youtu.be Seems if the link is not active - please copy and paste either links above or below - Thanks! https://youtu.be/k2RilLqYE5c http://www.rotory.com/coach/images/lithiumsuper.jpg width=640 If your information and efforts have anything to do with use of the common Group27/31 size 100AH lithium batteries in an RV, you might want to consider doubling of capacity ... without doubling of the area where the batteries are kept ... through use of these Group 31 200AH lithium batteries instead: https://www.lithiumion-batteries.com/products/12-volt-lithium-batteries/group-31-12v-200ah-lithium-ion-battery.php
pnichols 02/04/21 01:34pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: 3 Cheers for Us Tree Huggers...Biggest Sugar Pine Found

3 Sierra sugar pines added to list of 6 biggest in world Some people here call us derisively as tree huggers. Seriously, if you are here and it's because you love camping. Camping involve living among the trees -- in a forest :S. So why won't you like trees if you are into camping?:h Well ... I live in and around trees 24/7 whenever home between RV trips. Some of the trees that could fall on our house are 100 or more year old redwoods and oaks, with some of the redwoods being well over 100' high. The rest of our trees are other types that require constant pruning and dealing with the prunings, and/or leaf raking. It's constant work. I don't need "trees" to camp in - unless that's what it takes to get to trophy fish. On RV trips I'll take boondock camping in the wide open deserts any day over trees. The ultimate dream RV camping for me is to be way out there on the far side of beyond in the desert beside a desert lake ... either fishing that lake or sitting beside it at dusk watching those spectacular desert sunsets. :C Does that include having your brains fry in summer?:B Nope ... because: 1) I have great coach air conditioning with a quiet-enough Onan that can power it hour after hour out of the main 55 gallon fuel tank. 2) I have a multi-speed, reversible, powered roof vent fan for interior ventilation in a nicely insulated coach roof. 3) I have an Infinite Breeze 12V fan with a long extension cord for it so I can blast it right at us inside, or outside while sitting under the awning. 4) I have an old-school type awning supported by the steel struts that attach near the bottom of the coach wall to form strong triangles so that the awning can be left extended in up to moderate winds. 5) Both coach roof vents have covers over them so the vents can be left open for cross ventilation during high winds/storms without damaging the crank-up vents. 6) The V10 can be idled for hours so as to use the high capacity Ford cab A/C, in addition to the coach A/C, to keep the coach interior comfortable even in scorching triple-digit outside temperatuers. 7) The coach roof and coach exterior walls are white color. 8) Our rig is a "classic" Class C with the full size overhead cab extension that keeps the sun out of the cab. 9) In addition to the cabover shading, I carry along a magnetically attached heavy white cover for the cab windshield and cab door windows. 10) I carry along a large light colored umbrella for walking/hiking in the desert under the sun. 11) I carry along a beach umbrella for sitting under when relaxing or fishing on the shore of a desert lake. We do all of this without solar panels, as our two generators and idling V10 are all we need for part-time RV camping. Sitting around our full size natural looking propane fire pit in the cool desert evenings is sure nice, too. ;) In that case may I visit you for a BSing session with cold. 6-pack brew? At least, my freezer and ref is working.:B Please ... no visiting during hot weather ... as I only have one 3). :B and ;)
pnichols 02/04/21 01:25pm Public Lands, Boondocking and Dry Camping
RE: Download speed varies

Gary, after reading all of the above, I'm betting that your speed fall-offs have nothing to do with any routing issues. It's probably that the main Internet speed coming from your provider is falling off whenever too many folks around you using the same provider are online - just like the average 120 Mbps from my provider can drop down to 50-60 Mbps whenever too many of my neighbors are streaming from the same provider.
pnichols 02/04/21 01:21pm Technology Corner
RE: 3 Cheers for Us Tree Huggers...Biggest Sugar Pine Found

3 Sierra sugar pines added to list of 6 biggest in world Some people here call us derisively as tree huggers. Seriously, if you are here and it's because you love camping. Camping involve living among the trees -- in a forest :S. So why won't you like trees if you are into camping?:h Well ... I live in and around trees 24/7 whenever home between RV trips. Some of the trees that could fall on our house are 100 or more year old redwoods and oaks, with some of the redwoods being well over 100' high. The rest of our trees are other types that require constant pruning and dealing with the prunings, and/or leaf raking. It's constant work. I don't need "trees" to camp in - unless that's what it takes to get to trophy fish. On RV trips I'll take boondock camping in the wide open deserts any day over trees. The ultimate dream RV camping for me is to be way out there on the far side of beyond in the desert beside a desert lake ... either fishing that lake or sitting beside it at dusk watching those spectacular desert sunsets. :C Does that include having your brains fry in summer?:B Nope ... because: 1) I have great coach air conditioning with a quiet-enough Onan that can power it hour after hour out of the main 55 gallon fuel tank. 2) I have a multi-speed, reversible, powered roof vent fan for interior ventilation in a nicely insulated coach roof. 3) I have an Infinite Breeze 12V fan with a long extension cord for it so I can blast it right at us inside, or outside while sitting under the awning. 4) I have an old-school type awning supported by the steel struts that attach near the bottom of the coach wall to form strong triangles so that the awning can be left extended in up to moderate winds. 5) Both coach roof vents have covers over them so the vents can be left open for cross ventilation during high winds/storms without damaging the crank-up vents. 6) The V10 can be idled for hours so as to use the high capacity Ford cab A/C, in addition to the coach A/C, to keep the coach interior comfortable even in scorching triple-digit outside temperatuers. 7) The coach roof and coach exterior walls are white color. 8) Our rig is a "classic" Class C with the full size overhead cab extension that keeps the sun out of the cab. 9) In addition to the cabover shading, I carry along a magnetically attached heavy white cover for the cab windshield and cab door windows. 10) I carry along a large light colored umbrella for walking/hiking in the desert under the sun. 11) I carry along a beach umbrella for sitting under when relaxing or fishing on the shore of a desert lake. We do all of this without solar panels, as our two generators and idling V10 are all we need for part-time RV camping. Sitting around our full size natural looking propane fire pit in the cool desert evenings is sure nice, too. ;)
pnichols 02/03/21 02:23pm Public Lands, Boondocking and Dry Camping
RE: 3 Cheers for Us Tree Huggers...Biggest Sugar Pine Found

3 Sierra sugar pines added to list of 6 biggest in world Some people here call us derisively as tree huggers. Seriously, if you are here and it's because you love camping. Camping involve living among the trees -- in a forest :S. So why won't you like trees if you are into camping?:h Well ... I live in and around trees 24/7 whenever home between RV trips. Some of the trees that could fall on our house are 100 or more year old redwoods and oaks, with some of the redwoods being well over 100' high. The rest of our trees are other types that require constant pruning and dealing with the prunings, and/or leaf raking. It's constant work. I don't need "trees" to camp in - unless that's what it takes to get to trophy fish. On RV trips I'll take boondock camping in the wide open deserts any day over trees. The ultimate dream RV camping for me is to be way out there on the far side of beyond in the desert beside a desert lake ... either fishing that lake or sitting beside it at dusk watching those spectacular desert sunsets. :C
pnichols 02/03/21 11:33am Public Lands, Boondocking and Dry Camping
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