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RE: Motorhomes on Mercedes Chassis

.....but what makes me nervous about their construction is their height versus the width (stance) between their rear dually sets. The Sprinter based motorhomes look too tall for their width. They look to me like they could be blown over if caught just right in a sudden violent cross-wind. Even in moderate highway cross-winds, the ones I've observed from behind seem to lean a lot from the wind pushing. However I'm pretty sure that most owners or prospective owners of Sprinter based Class C (B+?) motorhomes don't notice, or pay any attention to, or pay any heed to ... this.I have to agree with you concerning this point. My own observation of Sprinter motor homes is that most of them are constructed too tall for their narrow width dual rear wheel axle. I have watched them maneuver around on irregular unpaved parking areas in truck stops. More than once my heart skipped a beat watching them tip sideways so extremely. I can't imagine what goes on inside the cabinets. I also see them getting tossed around on the open road from passing trucks and significant cross winds. I am perplexed that Sprinter owners don't complain or discuss any of it on RV forums like this one. There are plenty of E350/E450 discussions over the same thing, with replies sharing practical and very affordable solutions. I wonder if there are after-market heavy duty front and rear stabilizer bars available for the Sprinter. It would not surprise me if there is nothing available because MB is very stern on keeping everything MB down to the motor oil. Anything not MB voids their warranty. What a scam MB has going there. I lead a team of volunteer mechanics at THIS AUTOMOTIVE CHARITY within our church. We work on all kinds of older high-mileage vehicles including Mercedes and BMW. Those two brands will never be seen in my garage at home.....and I am 100% German. The Germans can keep their German engineering. PS: If you click on that link called THIS AUTOMOTIVE CHARITY and scroll down, there is a 2 minute video on the charity. You might find the video interesting because there is no other charity that actually uses the donated vehicles to help people with their transportation needs. CARS for kids, CARS for vets, those types of vehicle-donation charities liquidate the vehicles at wholesale auctions to support another mission. This charity goes deep with their donated vehicles. Your donated vehicle could be gifted to someone in need of reliable transportation. The most common scenario is a single mother with small children, but all kinds of people qualify. Whether given another vehicle, or repairing a vehicle already owned (helping owners with repairs is most popular) the recipients do go through an extensive screening process to assure the charity is helping the right people. It is one of the most rewarding things I have ever been a part of, been serving now in my 23rd year. Ron, I'll bet that the Sprinter's "narrow" chassis - along with that of some new U.S. small vans from Dodge, Ford, etc. - was designed primarily for more practical use in delivery/commercial vans to be used in the crowded and/or narrow streets in towns and cities ... especially for situations in Europe with respect to the Sprinter's design. As such IMHO they are marginal, if not bordering on risky, for use in RV's to be used on the open road in the widest possible variety of situations (such as in open windy country). I don't see how a stiffer suspension system will help to stop wheel lift on one side should a high power cross-wind hit one of these narrow-framed and tall motorhomes. I've driven our 24 foot, 11'5" tall, E450 based Class C in 50-60 MPH cross-wind gusts in the U.S. West and sure, I could feel the side-hits from the wind and of course held the wheel with both hands, but I did not feel at any time that our motorhome was in danger. However our rig does have it's heavy coach components and tanks down at or near frame height, and also I like to travel with near-to-full fresh water and 18 gallon propane tanks -> all of which keeps the overall center of gravity low. These things, combined with the Ford E-Series wide rear dually stance, makes for a great feeling of lateral (side-to-side) stability in open road cross-winds, roadway curves at speed, and when transiting into and out of parking lots.
pnichols 12/11/19 12:19pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Motorhomes on Mercedes Chassis

"The Sprinter cabin is much roomier and taller than the Ford cabin that when sitting in the house you get the feeling you're in a small class A since the view is much better, thanks to the tall windshield. " Sorry, but for a thread that has had a refreshing amount of honest reports/opinions about the Mercedes chassis Class C's I finally have to take exception to this post. There is no Class C {B+} with less interior volume/room than a Mercedes. Oh, and do not get me started on how uncomfortable the Mercedes seats are, compared to the Ford multi adjustable power seats the difference is day and night. The last thing a Mercedes is... is much roomier. My 24' E-350 Class C has 7' of head room throughout the coach. I would venture to state {without fear of inaccurate correction} that no Mercedes Class C has that much headroom. I have yet too see any Mercedes chassis Class C even close to the 101" of width our C has. My biggest objection to the Mercedes Class C's is two fold - they are MUCH smaller inside and the ridiculous cost to buy {not to mention maintain} one vs a Ford or Chevy chassis. Yes they can get 15 mpg though many do not. No they will not even come close to towing like a V-10 or large V-8 Chevy. If Mercedes floats your boat more power to ya {you will need it} but please folks... let's keep it honest here for the benefit of those who do not know any better. As always... Opinions and YMMV. Well stated above. I don't know what the interior ceiling height is in a Sprinter based Class C (B+?), but what makes me nervous about their construction is their height versus the width (stance) between their rear dually sets. The Sprinter based motorhomes look too tall for their width. They look to me like they could be blown over if caught just right in a sudden violent cross-wind. Even in moderate highway cross-winds, the ones I've observed from behind seem to lean a lot from the wind pushing. However I'm pretty sure that most owners or prospective owners of Sprinter based Class C (B+?) motorhomes don't notice, or pay any attention to, or pay any heed to ... this.
pnichols 12/10/19 08:29pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: 2WD or 4X4 for a truck camper

Okay,this is for hauling a truck camper only and what a new guy should get when going to buy a truck camper.. Here is a pretty honest opinion of the pro's and con's of both and yes,he has a truck camper..Northern lite 10-2 2WD vs 4WD with TC only Do you "Really Need" a 4X4 with a truck camper?.. Note that a pickup with a camper on it will have real good traction from the driven rear tires due to the weight on those rear tires. A pickup that most of the time is not carrying a heavy load in the bed actually needs to be a 4X4 more so than a truck with a camper on it ... because in slippery conditions a PU with little or no weight in the bed has terrible traction coming from the rear tires. Add front wheel drive to the front of a PU in slippery conditions ... and the heavy engine weight over those front tires provides way improved traction and braking over a lightly loaded bed over the rear tires. I know ... as I've made the mistake of trying to drive my 4X4 PU in snow conditions while having it in only 2WD. Boy was that an eye-opening and dangerous situation!
pnichols 12/09/19 09:18pm Truck Campers
RE: It is no wonder

No wonder the forum has so few posts. Every time you want to post something. You have to prove you are alive. I'm betting many just find that some what off putting, and not worth the hassle.. BTW. Y'all can move this any where you want. What/who controls "Captcha" and/or where does it come from, anyway: - Does it come from the server that handles the forum software ? - Is it an option that is turned on within the forum software? - Etc? Obviously ... why can't/doesn't someone who overall controls the operation of this forum shut off Captcha when us users complain enough? :h
pnichols 12/09/19 08:22pm General RVing Issues
RE: Who has sold everything and started rving for life

My husband and I are looking to sell everything and start worcamping. Everyone is calling us crazy ??. Tell me your thoughts and stories. Well ... what you are thinking about is nothing new by a long shot. Folks have been living as gypsies and nomads for milleniums all over the world. So far the DW and myself are trying to retain the best of both worlds - keep our home which is situated "in nature" with quietness, trees, views, gardens, deer, etc. - but also enjoy outings in the RV for as long as 10 weeks, so far. Both worlds have their advantages and disadvantages up to a certain point. HOWEVER, in no way would we want to be a gypsy or nomad when we're "old" ... that would be a bad situation in our opinion. So if you're thinking about going FT in an RV, in my opinion you better have an (expected) old-age or (unexpected) physical-limitation exit plan that is well thought out with regard to both medical logistics and financial realities. P.S. We also have friends, loved ones, and service groups that simply "keeping in touch via a smartphone" for long periods would just plain not be appropriate or work.
pnichols 12/04/19 11:25am RV Lifestyle
RE: Yosemite National Park's Upper Pines closed...

Interestingly, there is a new trend where folks actually buy weighted blankets in order to sleep better. I think we (the cold weather campers) have inadvertently discovered the same thing -- turn off the heat. Spread every blanket you own. Sleep like a log. But heaven help you if you have to get up in the middle of the night! ;) Wow ... talk about an opposite approach: I just ordered a new 24V DC electric blanket because the old one finally gave up the ghost. The one I ordered is made up of super light weight soft fleece material with ultra thin wires that can't be felt at all. I like to sleep at home with only this e-blanket on top - with no sheet between the e-blanket and me and no other covering on top of the e-blanket. When I get the temperature set just right, this way of sleeping gives me the illusion that I'm sleeping on a cot outside at a temperature so perfect nothing is needed to cover me to be comfortable - just like sleeping on some South Sea Island beech. Now, if only I could find enough room in our Class C to hold the batteries to run this blanket several nights without charging so I could sleep this way when drycamping! :h
pnichols 12/04/19 12:20am Public Lands, Boondocking and Dry Camping
RE: diesel class c

If you do not like the sound of a V10 in a class C. Get one with a Chevy chassis. Just my two cents…. Well ... the Ford V10 sound is certainly closer to the sound of a Ferrari V12 than the Chevy V8 sound is. :) A Ford V10 idles ultra quiet and smooth ... being just about vibration-free as felt on the coach floor. We sometimes idle our RV's V10 for an hour or so here and there in noise sensitive camping areas so as to partially recharge the coach batteries at high boost current rates from our stock Ford 130 amp alternator.
pnichols 12/02/19 10:11pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: More Genny wars

Just got the e'mail from Home Depot on their Cyber Monday sales and noticed a LOT of generators listed, new inverter units especially some larger Briggs types with 4500 to 6500 watt sizes, and thought this was funny, a little pair of sportsman's with the parallel kit for $599. Sportsman Seems like a lot of new players also with dual fuel units added to the mix now. Note that and FWIW, the specs for the Sportsman generator set state that they are not recommended for use above 3000 ft altitude. This may be OK most of the time, but not for overall general flexibility in RV camping.
pnichols 12/02/19 09:46pm General RVing Issues
RE: What do you do for condensation inside cabinets?

Install a Dehumidifier and pipe the drain outside and the problem is solved...other efforts just move the moisture around inside. That's the best long term solution so as to be ready for wet weather anywhere anytime ... unless Naio is trying to drycamp in the rain. If so, that probably means a generator has to be in the mix.
pnichols 12/01/19 09:53am General RVing Issues
RE: New RV TV show 11/17/19

Well, I didn't read all of this discussion thread or watch the show ... but I'll just bet that: The topic(s) didn't include how to boondock camp for several days out in the middle of nowhere without having to run into a town for entertainment, or to restock something, every other day in a towed vehicle or a tow vehicle. We sometimes boondock/drycamp in a small motorhome without a toad and stay put, once we're there. It took some time to learn how to do this and get our setup just right for this. We sure could have used just the right RV'ing show to help learn how to do this at the beginning. :)Well, considering you're not the target group, and your spending habits probably aren't profligate enough to register on their consumer chart, you're pretty much out of luck. Well, yeah ... my spending methodolgy is based on practical value instead of impractical wow-glitz. This sometimes requires me to buy at the high end and sometimes at the obscure end ... however with a lot of research beforehand, regardless of the end that I wind up at. ;)
pnichols 11/29/19 05:47pm General RVing Issues
RE: New RV TV show 11/17/19

Apparently there is a new RV show hitting TV on 11/17. It's called "The RVers" and will be on the Discovery channel at 8am. Made by the same guys who did "The Aviators" show on the same channel. https://www.thervers.tv/ Not a lot of info but it does appear to be much more about living/using/tech/do-it-yourself and not the usual junk about staged tours/purchases. Here's hoping... Well, I didn't read all of this discussion thread or watch the show ... but I'll just bet that: The topic(s) didn't include how to boondock camp for several days out in the middle of nowhere without having to run into a town for entertainment, or to restock something, every other day in a towed vehicle or a tow vehicle. We sometimes boondock/drycamp in a small motorhome without a toad and stay put, once we're there. It took some time to learn how to do this and get our setup just right for this. We sure could have used just the right RV'ing show to help learn how to do this at the beginning. :)
pnichols 11/29/19 12:16pm General RVing Issues
RE: Yosemite National Park's Upper Pines closed...

Maybe there are some lucky folks who were already ensconced in a campsite at Upper Pines before the storm hit, and are now enjoying the empty silence? That happened to us a few years ago -- it was wonderful: https://i.imgur.com/YUFnq4gl.jpg "border=0" https://i.imgur.com/m3zZPvb.pngClick For Full-Size Image. The only caveat is that our solar panels picked up very little juice -- too many trees, too much shade, too much cloud cover. After a few days, we almost had to run our generator! But, but, but Dan .... very few folks on this Earth (other than Antarctic 4X4 overlanders) could stand to camp in those conditions and sleep at night with no heat in their rig! I didn't even appreciate the cold nights in my tent in July in the High Sierras when I used to backpack up there. (I got my aversion to cold from being raised in Michigan and sleeping in an unheated 2nd story bedroom with old single pane windows so bad that snow was on the INSIDE of the windowsills in the morning just inches from my head in the bed. I moved to CA at age 19 and never looked back ... which includes setting our CA stick house and motorhome furnaces to 65 degrees during the night . Isn't that what big AGM RV batteries and occasional quiet generator use are for? ;) )
pnichols 11/29/19 11:57am Public Lands, Boondocking and Dry Camping
RE: Built in vs. Stand-alone GPS?

Edited to shorten. Hmmm ... if an eSim card can be installed in an iPhone or an Android phone that ties one to a global service provider ... then: 1. Do you then get billed each month by the global service provider ... just like you would if you had a sim card locking your phone to one of the common U.S. providers? 2. If one uses their smartphone only in, say the U.S., but via a global service provider - then are you saying that wherever you are in the U.S. - your phone will connect to whatever specific U.S. providers' cell signal is the strongest at your particular location ... i.e. be it a Verizon tower, or an AT&T towers, or a SPRINT tower, etc. at the time? If both the answer to both 1. and 2. above is "yes" ... then who are some 4G or LTE global providers that I could switch to, where can I find what plans they offer, and if there our some then WOW .... it seems like a no brainer to set up this kind of arrangement on my upcoming purchase of my first ever smartphone (to be Android based) so as to get best possible cellular signal coverage in the contiguous United States, Alaska, and Canada for RV travels? (P.S. Unlimited and speed un-throttled from a global provider meeting the above requirements would be the ultimate - but that probably doesn't exist or is extremely expensive if it does exist.) 1. Yes, I get on bill each month. 2. Yes, my phone seeks out and jumps to the strongest signal, regardless of carrier. Every phone already jumps to the strongest signal, but only within the network it’s locked to, unless roaming. My phone is in a perpetual state of “roaming”. I use GlobalSIM, I’m told there’s others, I just don’t know who they are. Global is the biggest. It’s not expensive, I have 2 permanently assigned phone numbers (in my case one 416, one 305, both of which are always ‘live’) unlimited calling (no roaming charges, no long distance), texting and data (never throttled, no tethering restrictionists) almost anywhere in the world for $75 / month. Thanks for your information follow-through .... I'm learning a lot, but it sure seems like a lot of research is going to be required if I want to break away from the comfort of good old Verizon (with it's expensive, limited full speed with unlimited data, good but not perfect, etc., coverage). By the way, I notice that the GlobalSIM's coverage map seems to show vast areas of no coverage in Western U.S. places where we like to travel in our RV. Unless I'm interpreting the GlobalSIM's coverage map wrong - pure Verizon coverage my be better or at least easily equal GlobalSIM's coverage. I thought providers like GlobalSIM offered service that would jump between U.S. networks so as to automatically use the strongest signal ... hence easily providing service coverage well beyond what the Verizon-only coverage map shows? Here's the GlobalSIM coverage map - which seems to show large poor/no coverage areas in the Western U.S.: https://www.globalsim.co/coverage/
pnichols 11/29/19 10:23am Tech Issues
RE: Built in vs. Stand-alone GPS?

My cell phone is ‘local’ (no roaming, no long distance) in most of the world, I can switch between several phone numbers in a couple of key strokes, or switch between most cell providers automatically or manually, again with a few key strokes. I confess that I don't know, and have never heard of, how to switch the DW's Verizon based smartphone or my Verizon based flip phone to another network automatically or manullly for making calls, sending texts, or accessing the Internet. Probably most Verizon customers don't how to do that either. When our phones have "no bars", we assume that means no Verizon cellular access is available ... even though AT&T/Sprint/Etc. cellular signals may be present and strong enough for their customers to access. In the Western U.S. on RV trips we are often not able get out with our cell phones - and I always assumed that was because of Verizon signal strength. I sure wish our phones could access any provider in those places just in case other providers happened to have strong enough cellular signals there. :( Look for a "dual sim" phone. You can put in sim cards from two carriers and then select the carrier you prefer. Even with a single sim phone, it only takes a few minutes to swap out the sim card and boom, you are on a new carrier. That said, I wouldn't keep multiple carriers going in one area but say you are going into canada, switching carriers can make a lot of sense. We travel a lot (internationally) and usually stop in the airport and for $10-30 a local carrier will pop in a new sim card with a phone plan already activated. Only downside is your normal phone number won't work (we have a phone number thru skype that works regardless of carrier and that's what we tell people to use) No, a dual SIM phone just ties you to 2 service providers. What you want is an eSim with a global service provider. This allows the phone to switch between different networks and work "locally" in other countries without changing sim cards. Hmmm ... if an eSim card can be installed in an iPhone or an Android phone that ties one to a global service provider ... then: 1. Do you then get billed each month by the global service provider ... just like you would if you had a sim card locking your phone to one of the common U.S. providers? 2. If one uses their smartphone only in, say the U.S., but via a global service provider - then are you saying that wherever you are in the U.S. - your phone will connect to whatever specific U.S. providers' cell signal is the strongest at your particular location ... i.e. be it a Verizon tower, or an AT&T towers, or a SPRINT tower, etc. at the time? If both the answer to both 1. and 2. above is "yes" ... then who are some 4G or LTE global providers that I could switch to, where can I find what plans they offer, and if there our some then WOW .... it seems like a no brainer to set up this kind of arrangement on my upcoming purchase of my first ever smartphone (to be Android based) so as to get best possible cellular signal coverage in the contiguous United States, Alaska, and Canada for RV travels? (P.S. Unlimited and speed un-throttled from a global provider meeting the above requirements would be the ultimate - but that probably doesn't exist or is extremely expensive if it does exist.)
pnichols 11/28/19 11:36pm Tech Issues
RE: 4 year old Forest River vent covers already failed

Maxxair covers are made with polycarbonate,AKA as Lexan a very high strength uv impact resistant material. Vent lids are made of cheaper lighter plexiglas material Not as UV or impact resistant. Get Maxxairs. Hmmm ... I wonder why vent lids can't be made of polycarbonate, AKA Lexan??? THEY ARE As I posted Earlier Then why don't those polycarbonate vent lids hold up as well as the Maxwell polycarbonate vent covers ... as it seems that owners of some RVs that must have come from the manufacturer, new, with polycarbonate vent lids seem to still notice them deteriorating fast because they didn't have vent covers over them? :h
pnichols 11/28/19 11:08pm Tech Issues
RE: 4 year old Forest River vent covers already failed

Maxxair covers are made with polycarbonate,AKA as Lexan a very high strength uv impact resistant material. Vent lids are made of cheaper lighter plexiglas material Not as UV or impact resistant. Get Maxxairs. Hmmm ... I wonder why vent lids can't be made of polycarbonate, AKA Lexan??? Even if vent lids were longer lasting, vent covers should always either be installed right away by new owners, or come stock on all RVs from the manufacturer ... because: 1. How are you going to keep the vent lids all the way or part way open for interior ventilation during rain, snow, and hail storms? 2. How are you going to keep the coach interior dry when you have left vent lids open for ventilation when away from the RV and rain starts before you can get back to the RV? 3. How are you going to keep vent lids from getting damaged or ripped off when you have them open for whatever reason - when either in the RV or away from it - and unexpected high wind gusts occur?
pnichols 11/28/19 08:55pm Tech Issues
RE: Built in vs. Stand-alone GPS?

My cell phone is ‘local’ (no roaming, no long distance) in most of the world, I can switch between several phone numbers in a couple of key strokes, or switch between most cell providers automatically or manually, again with a few key strokes. I confess that I don't know, and have never heard of, how to switch the DW's Verizon based smartphone or my Verizon based flip phone to another network automatically or manullly for making calls, sending texts, or accessing the Internet. Probably most Verizon customers don't how to do that either. When our phones have "no bars", we assume that means no Verizon cellular access is available ... even though AT&T/Sprint/Etc. cellular signals may be present and strong enough for their customers to access. In the Western U.S. on RV trips we are often not able get out with our cell phones - and I always assumed that was because of Verizon signal strength. I sure wish our phones could access any provider in those places just in case other providers happened to have strong enough cellular signals there. :(
pnichols 11/28/19 12:26am Tech Issues
RE: Built in vs. Stand-alone GPS?

$750 built in vs $20 mount for cell phone running a mapping app...hmm And yes the cell phone will work fine if you are going into areas without cell coverage. The major mapping apps allow you to download the maps to the phone ahead of time. Sorry but it will not work. Having the maps downloaded into the phone is no more usefull than having a map in your back pocket. Without cell service or GPS, the phone has no more idea of where it is than you do with that map. What do you mean when you mention "Without ... GPS" with respect to phones? I thought all so-called smartphones offered for the last several years could function as a satellite based GPS device? If they can be used that way -> then whenever a phone has the right application software set up in it, and can hold a complete map database in it's memory, and while it's receiving and processing satellite location information ... then it should be able to do anything a standalone satellite based GPS unit can do. Rarely in the RV forums has anyone explained clearly and fully what's the whole story regarding a smartphone being able to function as a pure satellite-based navigation device not needing any cell signal access. I'm still scratching my head on this issue ... and I wonder how many smartphone owners fully understand what's going on with respect to this. :h
pnichols 11/27/19 02:51pm Tech Issues
RE: Built in vs. Stand-alone GPS?

Like someone else said, Google, or a cell phone is great, IF you have cell or internet service. If not, it is just a useless hunk of junk. Not true at all.. Several GPS apps (for both iOS and Android devices) allow you to download the map database (in whole or just the part you need, in detail or not) and then your phone or tablet will work regardless of service availability, even in airplane mode. I use an iPad mini (8” screen) with a Bad Elf GPS dongle and end up with a GPS that I can also check in on RV.net with after I get there. Try that with your Garmin. LOL. Hmmm .... what exactly do you mean by "I can also check in on RV.net with"? You need Internet access to do that after you get to where you were going. (Some of our destinations don't end up where there is Internet access.) Also, I wonder how many smartphones have enough built-in memory so as to hold at all times the entire map database for North America ... like our 3550LM stand-alone Garmin unit can. We can travel anywhere in the lower U.S. or Canada or Alaska (or Mexico) without having to download any regional maps -> the huge map database for all of this is right there in the Garmin, which came with lifetime free map updates - which makes it a no-brainer to keep current. This makes for one less thing to have to remember to take care of/prepare before a major RV trip. P.S. A Garmin stand-alone unit will only lead you on a Wild Goose Chase if you let it do so. :) The comment I was replying to was that a phone wouldn’t work if you had no cell service. By tethering my iPad to my iPhone there’s very few places I don’t have Internet since I can access almost every carrier and just choose the strongest signal where I happen to be. As for storage, the entire map database for all of North America is on ~2.36 GB and you have the option of loading just the portion you need in which case it’s only a few hundred MB. Even the smallest of smartphones are 16 GB and 64 GB is pretty standard these days, some even 128 or 256 GB. I guess there's something I'm missing in what you're saying: We tether our iPad to our smartphone when on RV trips too ... since our iPad is not set up as an independent Internet device. However, our smartphone operates on the Verizon network ... and only that network because that's who we signed up with years ago. So here's my question - how can your iPhone "access almost every carrier"? How do these various carrier's bill you for your iPhone use on each of them, if you jump around on them as you please in any given time period? (I thought a smartphone was registered with, and the owner billed by, only one specific carrier that the owner's device is registered with.) Of course if a smartphone has a complete mapbase installed locally on it, and the smartphone can function as a satellete based GPS receiver independent of an Internet connection, then I guess that the right smartphone containing the right mapbase can be setup to look, act, and function like a standalone satellite based GPS navigator device. If so, the above point is not well made in most of the discussions comparing the two approaches to RV navigation aides. Also if so, I should probably retire my Garmin 3550LM and use a smartphone instead, for navigation help whenever we're RV traveling out in the boonies beyond cellular signal reception.
pnichols 11/27/19 02:35pm Tech Issues
RE: Built in vs. Stand-alone GPS?

Like someone else said, Google, or a cell phone is great, IF you have cell or internet service. If not, it is just a useless hunk of junk. Not true at all.. Several GPS apps (for both iOS and Android devices) allow you to download the map database (in whole or just the part you need, in detail or not) and then your phone or tablet will work regardless of service availability, even in airplane mode. I use an iPad mini (8” screen) with a Bad Elf GPS dongle and end up with a GPS that I can also check in on RV.net with after I get there. Try that with your Garmin. LOL. Hmmm .... what exactly do you mean by "I can also check in on RV.net with"? You need Internet access to do that after you get to where you were going. (Some of our destinations don't end up where there is Internet access.) Also, I wonder how many smartphones have enough built-in memory so as to hold at all times the entire map database for North America ... like our 3550LM stand-alone Garmin unit can. We can travel anywhere in the lower U.S. or Canada or Alaska (or Mexico) without having to download any regional maps -> the huge map database for all of this is right there in the Garmin, which came with lifetime free map updates - which makes it a no-brainer to keep current. This makes for one less thing to have to remember to take care of/prepare before a major RV trip. P.S. A Garmin stand-alone unit will only lead you on a Wild Goose Chase if you let it do so. :)
pnichols 11/26/19 05:07pm Tech Issues
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