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RE: RVs over 10 years old are valueless

This discussion showcases exactly why we look for RV camping spots where there isn't -> yelling little ones, loud music, loud talk around other campfires, electric bikes/carts carts buzzing past and ... where there isn't ANY RV AGE LIMITS. Here's an example of where we like to camp when we can: https://i.imgur.com/MgYz0ATl.jpg Beautiful. Where is that? My first guess was Cuddeback, but the hills in back look too tall. If memory serves me right - Death Valley on a 4x4 road, I think. We're planning on boondock camping there again this spring with friends in our 24 ft Class C RVs ... I hope it's open for boondock camping then. I do know that Scotty's Castle is closed, but that's just a place to visit in DV.
pnichols 01/09/22 04:20pm General RVing Issues
RE: RVs over 10 years old are valueless

This discussion showcases exactly why we look for RV camping spots where there isn't -> yelling little ones, loud music, loud talk around other campfires, electric bikes/carts carts buzzing past and ... where there isn't ANY RV AGE LIMITS. Here's an example of where we like to camp when we can: https://i.imgur.com/MgYz0ATl.jpg
pnichols 01/08/22 10:21am General RVing Issues
RE: ALL NEW Onan Cummins 2500i inverter generator - I LOVE IT!

For us small motorhome owners with the good old 4KW Onan gas or diesel generators - I wonder if/when Onan is going to come out with 4KW inverter gas and diesel versions? Combining the legendary Onan reliability with inverter technology for all of their models is long overdue!
pnichols 01/08/22 12:36am Truck Campers
RE: Propane prices

$2.75/gal to fill my home's big tank right here in the mountains just outside Silicon Valley in CA. It's been that price for quite some time. Sometimes if I'm around to ask the driver when the propane truck comes, he'll top up my motorhome's built-in tank too.
pnichols 01/08/22 12:14am Around the Campfire
RE: Fantastic Fan

A reversible RV ceiling vent fan has a little known use that can be outstanding: When traveling on dusty roads or even for traveling in any situation, if needed run the air conditioner or heater on the recirculate air setting, close up every window, and close up every ceiling vent except one with a reversible fan in it. Set this fan to the "blow in" mode, and set it on the slowest or next to the slowest speed setting. The fan then "tries" to bring air into the motorhome but "can't" because everything is closed up. What is then happening is this fan is establishing and maintaining a slight air pressure inside the motorhome. This slight air pressure keeps all dust out of the interior that otherwise might seep in through small cracks, window seals, door seals, etc.. We do this a lot to help keep the interior of the RV cleaner when traveling - especially in dirty air or when on dusty roads.
pnichols 12/07/21 11:32pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Is there a Class C that can be driven into sketchy terrain?

Wow again!!! Exactly what I’m looking to do. Believe it or not, my truck camper dimensions are as large! More height and only 3” less width than your class C. I found the “roads” in the Colorado rocky disbursed camping areas were barely passable. I had to carefully plan where to put my tires to keep the truck off the ground and off rocks. I did not, however, find I needed 4 wheel drive. It wasn’t slippery, it was huge gullies, ravines and holes in the road. By the same token, I saw more than one standard, stock class C go blasting very deep into the camping in Divide, CO that I wouldn’t do with the truck camper out of fear of the load shifting. The hills were crazy and they drove right up/down. I also feel like if you ever did get stuck with 2wd, winches are probably all you need. I could be wrong and I’m sure it’s a hot topic, but seems 2wd and winches would work great. Your setup sounds ideal. I want to carry a small enduro motorcycle to go into town with and get parts if needed. I carry that now, actually. But the garnish in reach is a good idea. Been meaning to get one. Good for medical emergencies especially. Thanks for this post. Very encouraging. We take our 24 ft. Itasca non-slide Class C slowly and carefully offroad at times. - We bought it new and it was based on the E450 chassis instead of the E350 chassis that is most often used for small Class C motorhomes. We wanted the overkill ruggedness, reliability, inexpensive/convenient repair/maintenance, extra weight carrying margin, and solid handling of an underloaded Ford E450 chassis supporting the coach. - I have stock E450 rims on it, but larger diameter tires on those rims in order to provide more ground clearance. - The fully mounted spare tire is carried in the rear up between the frame members just like on pickup trucks (for a lower center of gravity and elimination of an up-high bouncing spare ... as when carried on/above the rear bumper), and I carry a 12 ton double extension (for higher lift) hydraulic jack for emergency changing of a tire anywhere on soft/unstable ground. - We carry five 3-step homemade leveling blocks (plus additional wood pieces) along for leveling flexibility on sloped camping spots and for possible help in getting tires unstuck in soft spots. Wooden leveling blocks aren't as likely to break/split as much on rough/rocky surfaces as composite blocks. - We did not want any slides so as to provide for maximum shear strength in the walls, more reliability protection from a slide that won't close, less overall weight, less chance of leaks in heavy rains when camped or traveling, help in keeping the overall center of gravity low, and for elimination of any stress damage from slides jiggling slightly when traveling. - All kinds of tools and spare parts stay in the motorhome at all times so they're always there without having to load them special whenever we go on trips. These include such things as: A full size shovel, a pickaxe, a spare serpentine belt plus a special tool to help mount it, a crowbar, extra engine fluids, a tire puncture repair kit, tire inflation canisters, a full power compressor, Eternabond tape, a caulking gun and tubes of caulking, a remote inspection scope to look at plumbing and wiring in behind cabinets, spare plumbing piping and fixtures, spare bulbs, 12V and 120V extension cords, a high power 12V portable fan, a hand saw for large limbs, an axe, all kinds of flashlights, and the coach came with a built-in exterior roof access ladder to inspect for/repair any roof damage while on trips. - In addition to the built-in 4000 watt generator powered from the main 55 gallon gas tank and the built-in coach battery charger, we also carry along a portable generator and a portable battery charger. We can charge and keep charged our coach and engine batteries five different non-solar ways. - And last but by no means least: We carry along a Garmin Mini satellite rescue and text communication device (along with emergency rescue insurance) ... since many times we can be out of range of mobile phone cellular towers. Our main offroad concerns are - no 4X4, and the width and the height of the coach structure at 101 inches wide and 11'6" tall. But what this non-slide size and non-4X4 package gives us is all the comforts of home way out in many U.S. boondock areas and at purchase and maintenance pricing that we can afford. So far our most remote trip has been into the Oregon Outback 25 miles each way, during which we had to travel at around 7-10 MPH to keep the motorhome under control and free from damage. For what it's worth, you might want to carry your enduro motorcycle on a rack mounted on the front of a Class C. Bouncing weight hanging off the rear is not always a good idea if you can avoid it.
pnichols 12/05/21 05:41pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Is there a Class C that can be driven into sketchy terrain?

Mine is a 2004 Fourwinds Ford V10 E450 with Quigley conversion. They put I believe a 3" lift at the time and oversized tires for better clearance. I put a 2" spacer between back dually tires so I can air down and not "kiss" the sidewalls. I carry an air compressor. Would have a winch, however, I have a beach cart on the front end for surf fishing. Manual locking hubs with dana 60 axle. It's been bullet proof for over 100k miles. Having 4x4 is really essential if you have heavy angles/ditches and need pulling power of front tires. I like all the info PNichols mentioned and have most in my RV as well. Also a 40' long tow strap rated for 30,000lbs. Do your research and build your DREAM!!! Oooops, you reminded me: I left off my list our CHP (California Highway Patrol) approved hardened steel tow chain that we also carry along. I bought this chain after breaking our previous 30,000 lb. pull tow strap trying to yank our traveling companion's 24 ft. Class C out of a super-soft-shoulder stuck situation. I had to try because we couldn't get cell service out there in the boondocks north of Death Valley. I guess that our E450 V10 chassis can - with it's 4:56 rear differential and a lot of motorhome weight on it's rear duals on a hard and dry surface - exert an awful lot of horizontal pull force!
pnichols 12/05/21 05:34pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Is there a Class C that can be driven into sketchy terrain?

We take our 24 ft. Itasca non-slide Class C slowly and carefully offroad at times. - We bought it new and it was based on the E450 chassis instead of the E350 chassis that is most often used for small Class C motorhomes. We wanted the overkill ruggedness, reliability, inexpensive/convenient repair/maintenance, extra weight carrying margin, and solid handling of an underloaded Ford E450 chassis supporting the coach. - I have stock E450 rims on it, but larger diameter tires on those rims in order to provide more ground clearance. - The fully mounted spare tire is carried in the rear up between the frame members just like on pickup trucks (for a lower center of gravity and elimination of an up-high bouncing spare ... as when carried on/above the rear bumper), and I carry a 12 ton double extension (for higher lift) hydraulic jack for emergency changing of a tire anywhere on soft/unstable ground. - We carry five 3-step homemade leveling blocks (plus additional wood pieces) along for leveling flexibility on sloped camping spots and for possible help in getting tires unstuck in soft spots. Wooden leveling blocks aren't as likely to break/split as much on rough/rocky surfaces as composite blocks. - We did not want any slides so as to provide for maximum shear strength in the walls, more reliability protection from a slide that won't close, less overall weight, less chance of leaks in heavy rains when camped or traveling, help in keeping the overall center of gravity low, and for elimination of any stress damage from slides jiggling slightly when traveling. - All kinds of tools and spare parts stay in the motorhome at all times so they're always there without having to load them special whenever we go on trips. These include such things as: A full size shovel, a pickaxe, a spare serpentine belt plus a special tool to help mount it, a crowbar, extra engine fluids, a tire puncture repair kit, tire inflation canisters, a full power compressor, Eternabond tape, a caulking gun and tubes of caulking, a remote inspection scope to look at plumbing and wiring in behind cabinets, spare plumbing piping and fixtures, spare bulbs, 12V and 120V extension cords, a high power 12V portable fan, a hand saw for large limbs, an axe, all kinds of flashlights, and the coach came with a built-in exterior roof access ladder to inspect for/repair any roof damage while on trips. - In addition to the built-in 4000 watt generator powered from the main 55 gallon gas tank and the built-in coach battery charger, we also carry along a portable generator and a portable battery charger. We can charge and keep charged our coach and engine batteries five different non-solar ways. - And last but by no means least: We carry along a Garmin Mini satellite rescue and text communication device (along with emergency rescue insurance) ... since many times we can be out of range of mobile phone cellular towers. Our main offroad concerns are - no 4X4, and the width and the height of the coach structure at 101 inches wide and 11'6" tall. But what this non-slide size and non-4X4 package gives us is all the comforts of home way out in many U.S. boondock areas and at purchase and maintenance pricing that we can afford. So far our most remote trip has been into the Oregon Outback 25 miles each way, during which we had to travel at around 7-10 MPH to keep the motorhome under control and free from damage.
pnichols 12/05/21 02:51pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Motorhome Fuel Economy

I think the 16.8 mpg towing a Suzuki Jimny is much more realistic. A small, light towed vehicle should hardly affect fuel mileage. When I had an E450 based class C, of course it got much worse mileage, but towing a 3200 pound vehicle cost me less than 1 mpg. As far as getting almost 26 mpg in an 11000 lb motorhome? I think they adopted in Australia the time-tested American method of increase fuel economy- make up numbers to impress the internet! I hesitate using the word "impossible" with respect to the 26 mpg claim ... but maybe that word fits here?
pnichols 12/04/21 09:50am Class C Motorhomes
RE: Which fridge would you choose?

The various propane powered RV absorption refrigerators (i.e. Norcold, etc.) are really great for quiet, low electricity consumption food preservation. With one small change, they would be spectacular and about the ultimate solution for rain or shine, night and day RV food refrigeration: Suspend them inside the RV using flexible lines, in slightly larger cabinets, and with heavy duty gimbaled hanger systems that keep them constantly level. What an invention that would be! :C
pnichols 11/18/21 01:58pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: class c with v10

Also, just as side-comments: 1) The Ford E450 chassis comes (or at least used to come) with a larger diameter driveshaft than the E350 driveshaft, for less vibration in any length motorhome. 2) One can easily improve upon any negatives of the E450's higher rear differential ratio by using larger diameter tires on the RV. For instance, most E350/E450 based Class C motorhomes come stock with 225/75R 16 size tires. By changing to 215/85R 16 size tires (which are larger in diameter) you partially or fully compensate for the E450's higher rear differential ratio ... plus as a bonus - improve upon tread wear and increase the distance between the rear duals for better airflow cooling of the tire sidewalls in hot weather.
pnichols 11/10/21 11:30am Class C Motorhomes
RE: Taking B+/C Offroad Experiences

Ken, as I talked about and described in my earlier post in this thread - the DW and myself do carefully take our 24 ft. C offroad if necessary.
pnichols 11/06/21 10:47pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Taking B+/C Offroad Experiences

Anyone have experience you could share taking a B+/C on rutted trails with dips and some steeper inclines? We are considering replacing our dually 3500 4x4 Bigfoot TC with a 24 foot Born Free. Has you body developed stress cracks? Does it sound like body/chassis damage could be occurring? How you deal with long rear overhang clearance for tanks/plumbing? Doors/Windows still open easy? Dual pane windows not fogged year later - seal damaged? if we do get a BF, may lift an inch to help clearance. build some sort of guard for plumbing. If find it stalls on inclines/soft soils, may add rear locker and either underdrive unit or a t case for low range not installing a front axle. There are rare RV vehicles out there that can do just short of what a full-on jeep can do. They may not be called Class C or Class B+, but one can camp on the Far Side of Beyond via very rough roads and wind up when you get there with a good bed or two, a shower, a microwave, an oven, air conditioning, heating, etc.. Here's an example if one wants to go a bit beyond a Class C or Class B+: https://i.imgur.com/rpKr3Vil.jpg
pnichols 11/01/21 11:58am Class C Motorhomes
RE: Taking B+/C Offroad Experiences

Anyone have experience you could share taking a B+/C on rutted trails with dips and some steeper inclines? We are considering replacing our dually 3500 4x4 Bigfoot TC with a 24 foot Born Free. Has you body developed stress cracks? Does it sound like body/chassis damage could be occurring? How you deal with long rear overhang clearance for tanks/plumbing? Doors/Windows still open easy? Dual pane windows not fogged year later - seal damaged? if we do get a BF, may lift an inch to help clearance. build some sort of guard for plumbing. If find it stalls on inclines/soft soils, may add rear locker and either underdrive unit or a t case for low range not installing a front axle. Our Class C is a 2005 24 ft. slideless Winnebago Itasca one built on a Ford E450 chassis that we bought new in 2006.. We wanted a stable and reliabe MH that could handle exploring, rock hounding, and camping on rough backroads. We picked a small Class C on the heavy duty chassis (rather than an E350 chassis) to get larger brakes, stiffer springs, a stiffer frame, a larger diameter drive shaft, larger brake swept areas, a higher ratio differential for improved low speed crawling (4:56.1), torsion bars in both the front and back, and to gain a rear side-to-side stance as wide as possible for best lateral stability. I have since installed larger diameter tires on it to gain more ground clearance, which at the same time provides no more coach lift than absolutely necessary so as to keep the center of gravity increase as small as possible. It came with gravity locks on all cabinet drawers that have never come open when on rough roads. We have installed double locks on nearly all cabinet doors too prevent them from coming open on rough roads. Since the coach structure has no slides, the walls provide maximum shear strength to the coach structure. We haven't noticed any coach or frame damage from traveling on rough roads, but we do drive SLOWLY on these type roads. Windows and doors still all open OK (our windows are single pane). Our longest slow speed trip in the back country so far as been around 25 miles each way to a destination at only 7-10 MPH. The black and grey tanks our mounted up high right up against the underside of the coach floor and there is no plumbing for them hanging down low - it's all up at about frame height, with all of it inside metal walled outside cabinets. I wish our rear differential was a limited slip or locker one, but the weight on the rear duals is so high that on dry surfaces they offer superb traction and on dry soft surfaces they offer pretty good floatation at the rear of the motorhome. A Class C - whether 2WD or 4WD - should probably if at all possible not be driven on side-tipped backcountry roads or backcountry road grades ... if they are wet. Also, note in this photo below of us camping off a 4X4 road that our automatic step folds up so as be no lower than the lower edge of the coach wall so that the step won't be prone to scrape on rises/rocks in the road surface. Note also that the coach sidewalls slope straight upwards starting right at the rear tires on up to the rear bumper so as to provide somewhat of an improved rear "exit angle". Also, when crossing washouts or dips in backroads we try to cross them at an angle rather than straight-on. This helps greatly to reduce or eliminate rear end hangups. https://i.imgur.com/MmZEboRl.jpg
pnichols 10/31/21 09:39pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: smaller MH with 2+ separate comfy sleeping areas?

Great thanks everyone! pnichols, I am the same as your wife, I take over the comfy rear queen bed, for my bad back and better sleep lol. Hmm. so maybe the one above the cab could suffice for my husband, and dinette for the 9 yr old.. plus some tents just incase the older ones come along... It's a catch 22, we now want to tow a boat sometimes, but then with a MH won't have a car for easy exploring! Although, I guess we could tow a car when not towing a boat!! We do a variety of trips, everywhere from Yosemite, to Portland, to Shasta to Los Angeles to Olympic National Park next year we hope, and eventually Alaska!.. a real mix of towns and remote, although now the teens aren't coming we won't do LA in it again.. FWIW, just myself and my wife have traveled on two long trips across the U.S. (one of 9 weeks and one of 10 weeks) in our 24 ft. non-slide Class C and never needed a tow. However, our exploring and sight-seeing was not on remote/narrow forest roads, either, when on these trips. In the western U.S. we sometimes tow our small fishing boat, and sometimes rockhound explore and boondock camp in the desert ... all with just the Class C. We carry a lot of equipment and tools with us and I have oversize tires on it's Ford E450 chassis to provide more ground clearance. That's great to know, we were trying to imagine not having a car. some areas we will stay put at campsite but others we'd need a car, but then again a 24' is usually okay to park in most areas I'd assume, although there'd be the hassle of unhooking but then again we don't always need hookups... pros and cons I guess! We rented a 30' class C many years ago when visiting from England, before we lived here, before we'd ever had a TT. Even with that we found parking, bit did borrow a car and hitch a ride a big sur down to the beach area..Do you still have to level out and stabilize a 24' class C? that's a pain with our TT, and it's still a bit wobbly lol Our 24 ft. Class C is built on a Ford chassis that is rated for a lot more weight than the coach places on it. Hence, the chassis springs are stiff enough such that our coach does not wobble when we walk around inside. It was built on the Ford E450 chassis rather than the Ford E350 chassis that is most often used under small Class C motorhomes. We specifically wanted an E450 chassis under a small motorhome for several reasons. Note that many new small Class C motorhomes are now built on a chassis - Ford E350 or otherwise - that have maximum weight capacities only a few hundred pounds over the weight of the coach structure. This is going to make them somewhat wobbly - due to the weaker springs - and hence require stabilizers when camped. Regarding leveling, we want our motorhome level when camped for the most comfort when sleeping and for the longest life from our propane powered RV refrigerator. Propane RV refrigerators should be kept pretty level when parked for several hours. For easy leveling of our Class C when parking it, many years ago when the RV was level in a parking lot I mounted stick-on levels in the driver's cab area that indicate side-to-side and front-to-back levelness. At a campsite I just watch these levels and move the motorhome around and if necessary drive onto leveling blocks until these levels show the coach to be level. It's real easy to level the motorhome this way. We like our "little home on wheels" with us all the time. We don't even put out the awning or get out the BBQ, tables, chairs, etc., unless we're going to be in a campsite for more than overnight. However on trips we don't go into cities much or try to park at trailheads to hike much, so where we do go we can usually park our 24 ft. Class C easily and therefore don't tow another vehicle. Also, we do take it off-road a bit and some of these areas require a small RV.
pnichols 10/28/21 11:38am Class C Motorhomes
RE: Changing a tire yourself

I once had a flat on one of the rear duals that I discovered on my Class C while it was sitting in my back yard just before heading out on a trip. I called our traveling friends to wait up for us and then called my AAA ERS. They said that "they didn't service flats on dual tire sets" !!!!! (huuuuhhhhh?) I canceled AAA (after being with them for decades) and never looked back. I now have an ERS that is all about RV road service -> Coach-Net. (They're comprehensive - so they also function as an ERS provider for our pickup and sedan.)
pnichols 10/27/21 11:06am Class C Motorhomes
RE: Changing a tire yourself

2. You might want to not have just a regular high-tonnage hydraulic jack along - the better high-tonnage jack is one that extends higher just in case. i.e. A jack with dual cylinder capability so as to extend more than normal. i.e. What if the road shoulder is slanted downwards from the roadway, and the flat is on the side away from the roadway and you have/want to get the RV axle with the flat somewhat level?! Also note when you are buying a hydraulic jack that it needs to get under the axle/frame when the tire is flat or completely gone. Clearance can get very tight. Many higher tonnage jacks with decent lift may not go low enough. My high lift jack also starts out very low, then extends to around 20 inches. Just in case, I carry a full size shovel so that I can dig a shallow hole for the jack base if the jack doesn't start out low enough. Sometimes the hole might need a board in the bottom of it to make a firm base for the jack, in which case the hole would need to be large and deep enough to also make room for the board. My jack has a long handle so I can work it when it may be hard to otherwise reach it under the axle and in the hole.
pnichols 10/25/21 11:32pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Changing a tire yourself

Good considerations. For me, the answers would be: 1. I carry the plastic blocks with me - both in the MH and in the SUV. 2. This is why I carry two jacks. I have had an instance where I needed to use one jack to lift the vehicle so far, then placed a couple blocks under the second jack to lift it a bit further. I would also roll the vehicle to the least unlevel spot. 3. This happened to me. I simply put the bad tire in the back of the SUV until I could take it to a tire shop. 4. I keep a moving blanket, tarp, rain poncho, and a regular blanket in both vehicles. 5. In a worst case scenario, where there would not be a fairly level spot to pull over, food would be my least concern. Food would be my last concern, too ... but distruction of my propane refrigerator - from being too long parked at an angle while waiting for ERS to arrive and install the spare - would be a serious concern! :E
pnichols 10/25/21 05:22pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Changing a tire yourself

For you DIY tire changers out there (of which I'm maybe one, if ever required in certain situations): 1. Sometimes "along side" the road is soft, so in addition to all the tire changing equipment you might have along, you better have some boards (and shovel) along to create a proper support area for the jack's base. 2. You might want to not have just a regular high-tonnage hydraulic jack along - the better high-tonnage jack is one that extends higher just in case. i.e. A jack with dual cylinder capability so as to extend more than normal. i.e. What if the road shoulder is slanted downwards from the roadway, and the flat is on the side away from the roadway and you have/want to get the RV axle with the flat somewhat level? 3. If your spare is mounted up underneath like they are on pickup trucks (and is the case on our RV) ... even though you might be able to drop, drag, and mount the spare - where are you going lift up and store the flat tire if you can't lift it back up and secure it underneath? 4. Don't forget you may have to do tire changing in extreme heat, cold, rain, snow, sleet, high wind conditions, etc.. You might want to carry along a tarp, suitable clothing, and a portable fan to blow on you if you're doing tire changing work in the extreme heat. 5. If - worst case - you think you can merely "camp out" while waiting for roadside service to arrive and change your spare -> what if you're on a highly tipped/rough area just off the roadway. Will the RV be at too much of an angle to not damage your propane refrigerator and/or ruin food inside while you wait hours and hours for help? Of course if you're a boondock camper, you better be able to change your RV's tire in all kinds of strange situations. For this we carry along a satellite communication device ... but I hope my budget can afford to have $$$$$ trailside service come out to rescue us!
pnichols 10/25/21 12:06pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: smaller MH with 2+ separate comfy sleeping areas?

Great thanks everyone! pnichols, I am the same as your wife, I take over the comfy rear queen bed, for my bad back and better sleep lol. Hmm. so maybe the one above the cab could suffice for my husband, and dinette for the 9 yr old.. plus some tents just incase the older ones come along... It's a catch 22, we now want to tow a boat sometimes, but then with a MH won't have a car for easy exploring! Although, I guess we could tow a car when not towing a boat!! We do a variety of trips, everywhere from Yosemite, to Portland, to Shasta to Los Angeles to Olympic National Park next year we hope, and eventually Alaska!.. a real mix of towns and remote, although now the teens aren't coming we won't do LA in it again.. FWIW, just myself and my wife have traveled on two long trips across the U.S. (one of 9 weeks and one of 10 weeks) in our 24 ft. non-slide Class C and never needed a tow. However, our exploring and sight-seeing was not on remote/narrow forest roads, either, when on these trips. In the western U.S. we sometimes tow our small fishing boat, and sometimes rockhound explore and boondock camp in the desert ... all with just the Class C. We carry a lot of equipment and tools with us and I have oversize tires on it's Ford E450 chassis to provide more ground clearance.
pnichols 10/24/21 05:01pm Class C Motorhomes
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