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 > Your search for posts made by 'rjstractor' found 163 matches.

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RE: Almost found a truck

I’m not really looking for a truck, but I was driving by the ford dealership and noticed a gas truck, so I pulled in to check it out. Long bed, check; crew cab, check; cloth seats, check; vinyl floors, check; 7.3, check; 4.30 check; F350..... nope. If it was a 350, I would have really been impressed, but for some reason it’s a 250. Oh well, guess I’ll keep driving my old truck. Add the 350 spring pack and you have a F350, re badge it and no one will know unless they check the vin. I believe the rear axle is also bigger on the F350. We had a heck of a time finding our truck. Luckily my friend is a dealer in MD. Had what we wanted and bought it over the phone. But we looked for almost 2 mos solid within a 4 hr radius. Obviously not Ford guy, you need to do some reading. https://dustrunnersauto.com/f250-vs-f350/ The aforementioned article was written over four years ago, so it does not necessarily apply to new trucks today. It certainly applied to my 2000 F250, which thanks to its Camper package it is identical to the same year F350. One thing I picked up on Ford's website is that apparently the gas F250 use a six speed Torqshift-G transmission while all F350s have the 10 speed. Even if every other nut and bolt were identical that alone would be reason enough to get a F350.
rjstractor 10/18/20 07:22pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Swapping out the Water Pump

One of the things I liked about my old Gulfstream, even though the build quality was not top notch, was the ease of servicing things like the water pump. Mine was inside a compartment, just screwed to the floor under the water tank. It could be changed in less than five minutes. In fact, as part of my winterization process I just removed the pump and put it in my garage.
rjstractor 10/18/20 07:14pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Thor Axis 24.1

The Axis/Vegas is an RUV - which is a fancy way to market a C and A hybrid. They are built on the e350 or E450 Chassis - depending on which year it was manufactured. So they aren't a true Class A. They were marketed as a way to take kids to soccer games, travelling sports families, tailgating that sort of thing. I've owned a Thor Class A (an ACE) and while we knew what we were buying, I must admit that quality is about the lowest in the industry. But so are their prices. If you have realistic expectations then you might be OK, but buyer beware. The sprinters you are looking at are Mercedes chassis so there is a reason they cost more and you are comparing oranges to basketballs comparing it to a Vegas. A Class B Plus or small C on a Mercedes chassis is going to be so much easier and quieter to drive and your mileage will be much better as well. Nothing wrong with the Vegas/Axis if that's what you want and have realistic expectations but there isn't much comparison to that and something on a Sprinter chassis with a diesel engine. How does that make it not a Class A? It's built on a bare chassis with no factory cab or body. I understand the chassis is the same as that of an E350 or 450, but without the factory cab by definition it's a Class A.
rjstractor 10/17/20 07:30pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: RAWR Question?

Sooo, here's the question. Did steel get weaker in the last 30 years? Did mfgs get more regulated in the last 30 years? OR Did men become pansies in the last 30 years? In a rare attempt of mine to actually keep a thread on its original topic, here's an answer your question.... No, yes, and yes.
rjstractor 10/15/20 08:45pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Unlikeliest of engine swaps!!

I saw the video the other day and came away impressed. Logic dictates that a 6BT swap would have made more sense since that engine is more powerful and compact. But this guy had the 4-53 on hand and made it work. Getting that analog engine to mesh well with a digital truck (including the original Torqshift trans) is especially impressive.
rjstractor 10/15/20 08:25pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Over loaded pickup

My nephew, 27 yrs. old, decided to build a deck. Didn’t want to pay a delivery charge, so he go his BIL with his truck to go to the lumber yard to get 36 bags of concrete. The gentleman at the yard with his forklift ask if the truck could hold the load, BIL says “it’s got a V8”. Forklift operators says ok, you know the rest of the story. Depends on the truck. 36 bags of ready mix is less than 3000 pounds. Overloaded for a 150/1500 series truck but no problem for 250/2500 on up. My F250 would be a little over its GVWR with that load but slightly under RGAWR.
rjstractor 10/12/20 07:30pm Tow Vehicles
RE: 2021 Ford F-150 hybrid

"This model is also capable of hauling a 3325 payload" I will be much more impressed if the payload package is more obtainable and can be combined with the higher towing ratings. It has been almost impossible to get for the last 6 years and required seemingly unrelated compromises if you did special order it. Yep, I'm more interested in the real world payload capacity numbers, NOT towing capacity numbers. Especially with a big heavy battery in it. It won't have a big heavy battery. I would be surprised if the lithium battery in it weighs 30lbs. I would like to see at least 4 times that much battery. Agreed, a battery in the 10-15 kwh range would not be exceedingly heavy, and would allow for a 20-30 mile range on battery only. This would allow many commuters to run on battery only, while retaining the ability to tow heavy for long distances primarily on gasoline.
rjstractor 09/29/20 08:01pm Tow Vehicles
RE: EGR Deletes

Actually in 2005 there wasn't very much extra junk on the engine. My 2005 Duramax didn't have a DPF and certainly didn't use DEF, so probably the only thing it did have was the EGR. You beat me to it, 15 years ago there wasn't much to delete.
rjstractor 09/28/20 07:31pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Braking system & brake buddy

This has been probably one of the most debated questions on this forum. My only comment is that there are many supplemental braking options out there besides the Brake Buddy, so no, you do not need a Brake Buddy.
rjstractor 09/26/20 07:28pm Dinghy Towing
RE: Settle this for Sequoia and 4Runner owners...

Newer vehicles have a CVT (continuous Variable Transmission). They are more computer controlled via ECMs. They seem to shift quite a bit different then previous automatics. Yes, they can be manually shifted in most. Not sure which transmissions are put in Toyotas, but most newer vehicles including large trucks use a form of CVTs. What is your source on this? The only CVTs that I'm aware of are in smaller vehicles. Full size pickups use conventional automatics with torque converters, and large trucks that are automatic use either a conventional auto (like an Allison) or an automated manual.
rjstractor 09/24/20 07:50pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Ford F150 STX V6

With only 6500 lbs for GCWR it's possible your payload is barely above 1000 lbs. Not much left for passengers, camping stuff and tongue weight. The F150s are fairly light. On Ford's website the only models listed that are more than 5000 lbs are diesels and the Raptor. Of course, one needs to look at the yellow sticker and do the math prior to committing. I would think that the new truck would likely have more payload than his current one, what with the lighter aluminum body.
rjstractor 09/21/20 07:08pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Dodge 1500b van

You guys could muck up any thread. A simple “ we need to know what van you’re talking about” rather than a trip down Mopar memory lane would be more appropriate. But the OP is likely flown the coop anyway, so keep practicing your classic Mopar knowledge contest.... :B:B
rjstractor 09/21/20 07:02pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Ford F150 STX V6

If your current TV is an F150 and tows well, there is no reason than a new one should not tow as good or better. As far as engines go, even the little 2.7 Ecoboost will run circles around your current 5.4 V8, especially with the 10 speed trans.
rjstractor 09/21/20 09:19am Tow Vehicles
RE: Rivian 1/2 ton high temp, grade test. Good read/video

I just read that article earlier this morning and was shocked they did not say how much battery power the climbs used. Without that information it is all fluff. Guess they didn't want to say. Watching the video I was able to glean some data that gave me an idea of how much power that thing was using- at one point in the video the engineers were mentioning that they might be pulling 1200 amps for a minute or two at at time. At another point it was mentioned that they were charging to a max voltage of 440. That works out to 528 kw. Assuming they were running 60 mph, that's 8.8 kwh per mile. The maximum range Rivian truck has a 180 kwh battery. So at the flat out maximum towing power draw you are depleting your battery in just 20 miles. By comparison, take a Ford Ecoboost powered F150. Say running flat out in a hard loaded climb it gets 3 mpg. So, it's fuel lasts about 100 miles at the fuel consumption rate. Disclaimer- I'm not an engineer, so if anyone sees an obvious flaw in my math, call it out and my feelings won't be hurt. Also not a engineer. How would regeneration fit into this. A model 3 see’s regen rates north of 70 KW and that’s a two motor system. I can see regen rates north of 200 KW for 4 motor trucks. I have read some speculative numbers on the Tesla semi of 800 KW regen rates. This would also play into brake life. One pedal driving is an interesting experience. I go days at a time without ever touching the brake pedal. I can see this being the same in bigger applications. Cheers. In normal driving, especially stop and go, regenerative braking would be a huge factor. Going up hill or even on the flat while towing a high profile trailer at highway speeds, there's no regenerative braking at all. Towing tests with EVs on Eisenhower Pass show some battery capacity regained on the way down, but not nearly as much energy as was consumed on the way up.
rjstractor 09/20/20 07:23pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Rivian 1/2 ton high temp, grade test. Good read/video

I just read that article earlier this morning and was shocked they did not say how much battery power the climbs used. Without that information it is all fluff. Guess they didn't want to say. Watching the video I was able to glean some data that gave me an idea of how much power that thing was using- at one point in the video the engineers were mentioning that they might be pulling 1200 amps for a minute or two at at time. At another point it was mentioned that they were charging to a max voltage of 440. That works out to 528 kw. Assuming they were running 60 mph, that's 8.8 kwh per mile. The maximum range Rivian truck has a 180 kwh battery. So at the flat out maximum towing power draw you are depleting your battery in just 20 miles. By comparison, take a Ford Ecoboost powered F150. Say running flat out in a hard loaded climb it gets 3 mpg. So, it's fuel lasts about 100 miles at the fuel consumption rate. Disclaimer- I'm not an engineer, so if anyone sees an obvious flaw in my math, call it out and my feelings won't be hurt.
rjstractor 09/20/20 01:29pm Tow Vehicles
RE: RPMs dropping uphill, Ford f-450

Assuming you are around 25,000 lbs total. 100+sq ft of frontal area. You need 150-175 hp to go 60 on a level ground. Another 50-55 hp per 1% grade. You are needing more HP than you have. Yes you should be slowing down some. Also, I don't believe a 2013 has 400hp. But could be wrong. Marty Yep, like Marty says you're bumping up against the laws of physics. The 2013 is rated at 400 hp but it's not putting that much to the ground. People like to crow about how their rig can "pull 30K up a 6% grade at 80 mph" or some such nonsense, but typically they are fibbing about the weight, the grade, or the speed, or all three. To give a basis for comparison, a semi I sometimes drive weighs 30K empty and pushes a similar frontal area to your combo. Hammer down, it will pull a 6% at 60 with a good run at it, and it has 10 speeds, 515 chassis dyno certified horsepower and over 1500 ft.lbs of torque. Loaded to 72K it's more like 40, and that's not bad. So if you're getting pulled down to 50 or so on a 5% grade weighing 25000 lbs combined, it's not the truck, it's just math.
rjstractor 09/10/20 08:10pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Class C Specifications

I weighed our rig empty removing anything that wasn't bolted down, no people, no fresh or waste water, but it did have a full 55 gallons of fuel and full 40 pounds of propane. It weighed in at 9,920. For the record, we don't have a slide out. Loaded up during our "heaviest trip" full fresh water, two adults, full fuel, etc, the rig weighed 11480, just 20 pounds shy of the chassis limit. During that "heavy" trip, our rear axle was officially over-loaded by 420 pounds, and our front axle was under-loaded by 1340 pounds.And it sounds like it worked out just fine. Per the photo in your sig (it's a beautiful rig) have a great trip! Chum leeYes the trip worked out perfectly fine. I never noticed the extra weight being of any concern. I made sure the tires were inflated according to the load and had a good trip. I wonder if "some" of the reason why the 2007 E350 and earlier years, the Ford spec'd rear axle limit of 7800 pounds was stated as such because the rear end was not equipped with any kind of rear stabilizer bar or trac bar. My rig has both (heavy duty versions) installed after I took delivery. The rig handles nicely. Maybe my suspension upgrades indirectly increased the rear axle limit by some amount. It would be nice to hear from an expert on this subject matter. I'm assuming you have the same load range E rated tires that are used on the E450? In that case you have a lot of reserve tire capacity. An issue on the bigger E450s is that when you load up to the GAWR, the limits of the tires are approached. With the cramped wheelwells these rigs have, there is not much air circulation for tire cooling and these tires heat up when loaded to their max. IMO I think that's why owners of larger E450s or 4500s need to watch their RGAW to keep from overloading the tires.
rjstractor 09/10/20 07:52pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Ford 7.3 v8

You all realize that the RV versions of this 7.3 drivetrain will not be appreciably better than the outgoing V10, right. It’s disappointing that the chassis models get old technology and less power. IIRC the lower power rating is due to the way engine power is certified (bench dyno vs chassis dyno or something like that) in commercial vehicles vs pickups. The F550 also is rated at 350 hp instead of the 430 in the 250/350. I believe the actual engine output is the same. Someone much smarter than me (maybe Shinerbock) could explain it much better. It's too bad the motorhome only gets a six speed trans though.
rjstractor 09/07/20 09:21am Tow Vehicles
RE: Ford 7.3 v8

Curious...anyone know if this big block gasser’s casting was based on the old 7.3L diesel ? That would have been a consideration if I was going to build a new gasoline big block... I would say that's extremely unlikely, since the 7.3 diesel was not a Ford engine. It was a Navistar engine adapted for use in Ford trucks, not unlike the Cummins in the Ram. The displacement number may or may not be a coincidence.
rjstractor 09/07/20 09:12am Tow Vehicles
RE: Help: Towing A Jeep First Time

When I unhook my Jeep from the motorhome, the first thing I do is unlock the doors, put the transfer case back in High Range, and the transmission in First Gear. THEN, and only then, will I unhook the towbar. I don't even use the parking brake when hooking up. Connect the towbar, put the transfer case in Neutral, the transmission in 6th gear, set the ignition switch, and lock the doors. I never have to worry about not releasing the parking brake, because it isn't set to begin with! It works for me, you do what is right for you. That sounds like a good plan. I'm also concerned I might forget the parking brake and tow the Jeep with the brake on. My parking brake seems to be very strong so I would probably notice, but you never know. I towed a 1988 Dodge Colt Vista AWD wagon (a crossover way before they were cool) almost 100 miles with the parking brake on-once. I did not feel it since I didn't have the brake on hard, but those drums were sure hot! As you (and I) have found, a missed or wrong step when connecting or disconnecting a toad can be expensive, disastrous or both. A procedure where you do it exactly the same every single time eliminates this. If it helps, have a partner go through it with you, as long as said partner won't distract you. You don't want to stop and do something else in the middle of the procedure. I started with mine written down, and as I got used to doing it I could run through it in my mind as I performed the steps. When I was done I would mentally run through the list again. After that one incident I never had a single problem hooking or unhooking.
rjstractor 09/06/20 08:53am Dinghy Towing
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