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 > Your search for posts made by 'ron.dittmer' found 152 matches.

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RE: We've had 8 years and 68,000 trouble free miles...

A thread has been around either on this forum or was it another, a Nexus bashing thread. I am happy to read Desert Captain's report. I too appreciate his refreshing report as well as the replies to it. Our rig is smaller than his at 23'-8" long, rear corner double bed B+. Like many comments here, it's a good length for the sake of mobility and utility. It's a cottage not a mansion, just right for it's purpose. I envy Desert Captain's accomplishments in his time frame and miles driven. We can't seem to get away as easy as it should be. I suppose it's what we put on ourselves here when at home, and all this "COVID stuff" didn't help. Desert Captain, Thank you for sharing that.
ron.dittmer 08/15/21 05:07am Class C Motorhomes
RE: Supplemental Braking Systems

I never heard of supplemental braking for the motorhome. If you are referring to supplemental braking for your tow vehicle, we have a Unified tow brake system by US Gear. It works effectively because of the system's vacuum pump that keeps the power brake booster charged. The pump goes on when touching the brake pedal and goes off after roughly 30 seconds of releasing the brake pedal. It is installed into the tow vehicle in a "once and done" fashion.....I installed the system myself into our 2006 Jeep Liberty back in 2009. All we do is hook up the umbilical cord and the other normalities for towing and it's ready. We have had this system for 12 years now and it still works like new. The controller for the system is mounted on the RV dash board to adjust it's sensitivity as conditions call for, while you tow. One day we will eventually have to change tow vehicles. My plan would be to transfer the system to the new tow vehicle. Here is the installation diagram for the system which looks challenging, but wasn't bad in reality. https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/proxy/qUQib-PdtxR0HGgB3r5Kuylakq91QARzTEYF5k54UsK84VrHHUHfq2mg2iXkr4Dok3qzVXTvx3728JjJqjgEyiQbWD5Slvo5mMkjfcoTSnjoH8srq_9K width=640 Here is the controller in our 2007 E350 chassis motorhome....#2 in the diagram. https://live.staticflickr.com/762/22047323699_d158cc6e33_z.jpg width=640 Braking force to the tow vehicle is consistent whether braking softly or braking abruptly with the motorhome. It takes some getting used to because during most braking conditions, you feel the tow vehicle slowing down the motorhome. It helps to keep the motorhome brakes cooler at the expense to the tow vehicle brakes. I consider that a "plus". Tow vehicle brakes are not worked so hard to overheat, but they do more than their share of slowing down the train, and it's brake pads and rotors are a lot cheaper to replace.
ron.dittmer 07/21/21 11:03am Class C Motorhomes
RE: trying to get stuck tire off

There is a product called "Never Seez" that is a type of grease that you can paint onto wheel studs and you will never again have that problem. I use it all the time on wheels, and brake discs, and other stuff that gets exposed to water and might someday have to come off. Doesn't solve your problem, but prevents it from happening again. Oh, and yes, use a sledge hammer. I agree with everything you are saying. You call it "Never Seez". The industry calls it "Anti-Seize" sold under many different names and labels. Google the word anti-seize. Remove the cap and there is an application brush attached to it like this. https://www.bio-circle.com/media/image/61/19/99/C25010_Metallfreie-Montagepaste_250g_PF_300x300.jpg width=200 I use anti-seize compound on contact areas for brake rotors, alloy wheels, wheel hubs, and lug stems.....any such things that get badly corroded, that you want to come apart easy later.
ron.dittmer 07/19/21 02:11pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Front Sumo Springs

Are you certain you need extra spring assist up front? Maybe your condition is like I had where the extra weight behind the rear axle lifts the front making it lighter and higher. I addressed the condition through replacing the front coil springs with lighter-duty versions to soften the ride up front along with lowering of the front suspension by 1.25". CLICK HERE to read all about it. I included a diagram of my weight distribution and before/after pictures. I previously installed heavy duty versions of stabilizer bars, front steering stabilizer, and shocks to improve handling. The softer front springs actually improved handling a little bit better yet. The rig is more tame since the change in front coil springs.
ron.dittmer 07/10/21 11:17am Class C Motorhomes
RE: Considering move from class A to C

Ron, from your photos above it looks like the captain's chair also slides forward and backward? (as well as swiveling) If so, note that whoever is using the captain's chair in your RV can also face it at the right hand dinette seat, slide the captain's chair all the way forward to be as close to the dinette seat as possible, and then raise up their legs to rest their feet on the dinette cushion. We do this all the time with our very comfortable stock barrel chair. This is also a good way, from a barrel chair or captain's chair, to watch a small portable TV screen (or computer monitor screen) that is sitting on the dinette table.Yes, as I stated before, I use the dinette bench as an ottoman. A person sitting in that 3rd captain seat has their own dining surface through utilizing the flip-up countertop across from the main entry door. It's not ideal, but works in a pinch.
ron.dittmer 07/05/21 04:38pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Considering move from class A to C

I would suggest (works for me as I get older) you get one with at least 2 different places to sit. Sitting at a dinette gets old, I shift to the barrel chair, you may have a couch. Two places to sit. Its very versatile Yes Indeed! Our rig has a dinette and a 3rd seat, originally with a barrel chair that I changed with a 3rd matching captain chair. That was one of my better modifications that cost me around $400. Before with barrel chair. https://live.staticflickr.com/4543/38066818464_59da1639fa_z.jpg After with the matching captain seat. https://live.staticflickr.com/7813/46394369205_f4d40eac53_z.jpg The front-most dinette bench seat is used as an ottoman here. https://live.staticflickr.com/4531/37897326165_938fa70aa4_z.jpg Here, the front passenger seat is the ottoman. https://live.staticflickr.com/6173/6191936126_12d4e1ae89_z.jpg Needless to say, we fight over this seat. It is also a nice seat for a third passenger. When adjusted out into the isle and swiveled forward, the passenger can look out the windshield fairly well. FYI: Our scaled-down 93" wide rig has no slide outs. This is our interior, the picture taken from the rear corner double bed. https://live.staticflickr.com/8518/8462453675_5d79315fcc_z.jpg
ron.dittmer 07/05/21 11:53am Class C Motorhomes
RE: Unusual Class C

I agree that the unique changes in that particular rig are a matter of taste that I personally don't care for. But I noticed a few un-tampered Telstars out there that have been garage or barn kept, in great shape. If looking for something very affordable and well constructed, look at a Telstar. There were many different floor plans available. Of coarse the one drawback to anything that old is the gas hog E350 chassis of that era. The V10 engine introduced in the RV industry around 1998 is much more fuel efficient and less temperamental.
ron.dittmer 07/02/21 07:39am Class C Motorhomes
RE: Unusual Class C

I noticed the Telstar line of motorhomes many years ago. If it fit inside our garage, (too tall) maybe I would be an owner of one. I think their production was from 1985-1995. There is one with a purple interior and a built in car phone on the wall that was owned by Barbara Streisand. CLICK HERE to see it. It might be in a museum today.
ron.dittmer 07/01/21 05:50am Class C Motorhomes
RE: Front stabilizers on Class C Jamboree

If your rig moves a lot when parked, then it moves a lot when being driven. So if you are thinking you need stabilizer jacks, you might benefit from heavy duty front and rear stabilizer bars also called sway bars. Motorhomes built on the Ford E350 model 2007 and older, don't have any kind of rear stabilizer bar unless added by a previous owner. If you lack a rear stabilizer bar, adding a heavy duty one will significantly reduce the need for stabilizer jacks. CLICK HERE for instruction on a simple test you can perform to help determine if you could benefit from such suspension upgrades.
ron.dittmer 06/24/21 07:58pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Looking for Short, Used Class C with Island Bed

An island bed without it being inside a side-protruding slide out is a rare find these days. Being only 26 feet over-all length is even harder to find. I don't like a slide out located above or behind the rear axle because of the issues with weight distribution. I feel a centered walk-around queen bed without a rear slide out makes for an ideal bedroom in a class B+/C.
ron.dittmer 06/23/21 05:56pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Class C that's easy to fix?

The problem with a class A is that shops don't want to work on them. If you get stranded out in the middle of nowhere USA, your towing fee could be extremely expensive and your down time tragic. The Ford E350/E450 and the Chevy 3500/4500 cut-away chassis are most apt to be taken care by shops because the chassis is very common and they can follow their shop software with no timely surprises. I recall reading some years ago, one class A gasser required the removal of the entire face of the motorhome (windshield and all) to replace certain components. Think about that one.
ron.dittmer 06/21/21 06:16pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: 24 ft or less B+ with over head bed.

I agree that the E450 is the best of the bunch. The only thing I would do concerning the extra rough ride in back on the lighter weighted rigs would be to "tune" the rear suspension to better match the actual load it carries. Too much extra capability will make a rough ride even more rough. Many RV owners complain about their rig thrashing around. Maybe something can be done to soften the ride. How to "tune" the rear suspension is another topic involving the removal of the proper amount of E450 leaf springs. I have no personal experience to provide, only theories. I imagine it would begin by comparing the leaf spring packs of the E450 to the E350, learning what you can from the differences. Also compare your E450 actual rear axle weight to the limit of the E350 of the same model year. If you are rear axle weighs 1000 less than what an E350 rear axle can handle, then you want your leaf stacks to be that of an E350. Again, my theory alone.
ron.dittmer 06/21/21 01:29pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: 24 ft or less B+ with over head bed.

When it comes to handling, motorhomes are not much different than rental moving trucks. Imagine setting a 4 ton machine in an empty box truck right at the overhead door, then another time, place it right behind the cab, then another time left or right of center. Then do everything in a short box truck and again in a long box truck. That is how motorhomes vary.
ron.dittmer 06/21/21 06:53am Class C Motorhomes
RE: Class C that's easy to fix?

Here you go et cetera. A V8, likely a GM. https://i2.wp.com/howtowinterizeyourrv.com/wp-content/uploads/135840-every-wonder-whats-under-the-doghouse-of-a-class-a-gas-scaled.jpg?resize=1080%2C675&ssl=1 width=640 Here is a V10 engine, 99% sure it's a Ford https://5startuning.com/wp-content/uploads/Ford_68L_intake1_lg.jpg width=640
ron.dittmer 06/20/21 05:58pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Customizations / mods to the Freelander 21QB

Since we are sharing...... CLICK HERE for my list with pictures of mods and little things added to our Phoenix Cruiser since we bought it new in 2007. I have maintained this post since it's inception in January 2009.
ron.dittmer 06/20/21 03:23pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: 24 ft or less B+ with over head bed.

Every motorhome, brand, length, wheel base, etc. has it's own unique driving characteristics. I got gutsy last year and decided to optimize our rig further than most people would consider. CLICK HERE to read about it which includes many descriptive pictures. Again.....Every rig is different so you will need to do your own research on whether your rig would benefit from doing something similar.
ron.dittmer 06/16/21 06:09am Class C Motorhomes
RE: Wheel simulators, tire valve extensions and other questions

In the 14 years and 38,000 miles of driving, we never had trouble with our wheel simulators but I always wanted Alcoa wheels with Borg valve extenders and decided to do the upgrade when buying new tires. CLICK HERE to see them on our rig. I am happy with my $1620 decision. I sold 4 of my original 6 steel wheels with original tires for $400, and separately sold the original wheel simulators with valve extensions for $100 to reduce the overall investment to $1120. I see the Alcoa wheel package HERE just had a price increase from $1500 to $1600.
ron.dittmer 06/13/21 07:09am Class C Motorhomes
RE: 24 ft or less B+ with over head bed.

I would not know how the E350 and the 3500 compare for any particular model year. I only have the E-series spec sheets.
ron.dittmer 06/08/21 01:11pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: 24 ft or less B+ with over head bed.

A small motorhome built on a Ford E450 or Chevy 4500 chassis will provide a very rough ride because the chassis is designed to carry a lot more weight than is actually being carried. Our 2007 Phoenix Cruiser 2350 is 23'-8" long, is built on a 2007 Ford E350 chassis, and even it was over-capable in the front axle, making a more rough ride for us sitting up front. I finally got brave and addressed it last year. CLICK HERE to read all about it. I included many pictures for clarity.
ron.dittmer 06/05/21 06:19am Class C Motorhomes
RE: 24 ft or less B+ with over head bed.

The Phoenix Cruiser has always been a B+. I own one with the typical cabinets and TV in that area. You could special order that space as a bunk. To get it so, you would sacrifice what I have plus the easy entry into the cab area. The overhead bunk would make an excellent loft for a child or pet to sleep in as well as for open bulk storage. It would also increase roll-over protection because the van roof with its rear support would not be cut. Here is an old Phoenix Cruiser, maybe a 2002 model year, with the overhead bunk. I think today it would be finished off with more interior volume. If you sought an exceptionally deep bunk, I think you could have the factory build it some additional inches more rearward. https://live.staticflickr.com/561/18403520006_0af63d114e_z.jpg width=640 For comparison, here is my rig. https://live.staticflickr.com/8518/8462453675_5d79315fcc_z.jpg width=640 This is what is done to every PC like mine which is just about every one made. It is also what happens to every other class B+ and C motorhome. https://live.staticflickr.com/6173/6205758603_595094aa37_z.jpg width=640
ron.dittmer 06/03/21 07:46pm Class C Motorhomes
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