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 > Your search for posts made by 'toedtoes' found 270 matches.

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RE: To buy a generator or not...

As mentioned, the first thing is to find out the generator rules. Some places let you run it all day, others limit you to two 2-hour periods each day (usually around breakfast and dinner times). That will determine if a generator will be useful or not. As this is your second reserved trip where weather is a potential issue, I do suggest you do your reasearch on the average weather for an area and time frame BEFORE making reservations. Campgrounds along I-5 and Hwy 99 are usually hot during the day and night - due to the mountains on either side, they do not get the nightly breezes that drop the temps overnight. For summer camping, I recommend going up into the Sierras or to the coast. The daytime temps will get hot, but nights tend to be very cool. Stay out of the foothills and the I-5 stretch until October through April. During the off season, they are cool and fairly empty.
toedtoes 07/26/21 03:11pm Truck Campers
RE: Food Trip: Dogs and Doughnuts

My favorite donuts are Tim Hortons' Timbits: Donut holes in every flavor of donut. The perfect ratio of donut to jelly. The perfect size to pop in your mouth as you drive down the road.
toedtoes 07/26/21 09:53am RV Parks, Campgrounds and Attractions
RE: Newby questions

I had an 18-1/2ft TT and have a 21ft class C. Here are my observations in regards to space: With the class C, I have the dedicated cabover bed. That makes up for the lost space due to the cab and engine. Without a cabover bed, space would be much tighter. With the TT, I did not have a dedicated bed. I had a convertible dinette and sofa. Some of the 3ft less in overall length of the box was added back with the tongue and hitch. With a 21ft box, I would have gained 3 ft of inside space, but the total length would have increased due to the tongue. Spacewise, I don't think I could have had a dedicated bed, dinette, and sofa even with the additional 3ft. With the TT, you need to add the length of the tow vehicle. With the class C, you can choose not to tow a toad so your length remains at the rig length. If you choose to tow a toad, your total length increases. I recommend you look at floorplans and "daydream" about how you would function in them. Whether you find one or the other better will be a personal choice.
toedtoes 07/25/21 05:28pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Trailering after a stroke

Full recovery is a great expected outcome. Be sure to tell your doctors that you want to continue trailering. They can make sure your rehabilitation includes that as a goal. A stroke is different than a heart attack as it affects the brain's cognition. Your brain needs to recreate or create new pathways. Your doctors will help you with that - the first three months is the most important. Do the therapy as directed. This is where many folks fail and their mobility suffers for it. Good luck.
toedtoes 07/23/21 08:37am RVing with Disabilities and General Health Issues
RE: Yosemite questions

Late September can be good - cooler temps (especially night temps), less crowds, and low chance of bad weather. However, as mentioned, the water flow will be minimal to nonexistant - especially this year as there was no snow last winter. Unfortunately, fires are a big potential. So keep watch for any fire reports for the next couple months. Early September is likely to still be hot and the crowds bigger. Lack of flowing water and fires will be the main letdown. Fires in the region will also affect visibilty of the night skies. As mentioned, spring gives you the biggest bang for flowing water - especially if there is snow this winter. Minimal concern about fires, but fire damage from this year may affect campgrounds next spring. What time in spring will depend on snowfall. If minimal snowfall, then roads will open sooner. If lots of snowfall, then roads may stay closed later. Spring will also see wildflowers in the meadows. Night skies will be clearer with no fires. If you aren't interested in doing a longer trip and seeing more of California, I would stay on the east side. From there, you can also visit Mono Lake and Bodie Ghost Town.
toedtoes 07/22/21 12:50pm RV Parks, Campgrounds and Attractions
RE: Speed limits

I have to agree. this discussion is silly, bordering on stupid. bumpy Since when is a discussion on safe following distance silly ? There are many silly things discussed on this forum, but safety isn't one of them. Just because people have a differing opinion on what is safe makes it silly ? I was referring to the quibbling about 3 or 4 seconds, of F-150 PU or VW bug, that debate was silly bordering on stupid. bumpy Actually what is silly is thinking everyone can easily judge distances while in a moving vehicle.
toedtoes 07/21/21 04:47pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Speed limits

"but as you increase speed you also need more distance to give enough time to react" My statement does exactly that! Faster you drive there will be more distance between you. Two seconds at 90 the distance between will be greater than at 55. I stand by Mr Purvis' drivers ed recommendations many years later. Exactly...I knew someone would question this, not thinking it through! I drove to drivers ed, but was not old enough to have a license yet. D's ed was fun, and I did learn from the experience. Jerry I have thought it through and regardless I stand by that 2 seconds will not be enough at greater speeds. Even though the distance will be greater I just don't see the increase being enough to compensate for the increased stopping distance it would take to react and actually stop if something happens in front of you. Most of the accidents as well as traffic jams I see on my 40 mile commute to work are from people following to close to the cars in front of them. I understand what you guys are talking about as I was taught the 2 second rule as well, but I just don't think it is enough at greater speeds. To each there own. The rule is actually "at least three seconds" not "two seconds". As I mentioned above, the two seconds started being used to try to get commuters to back off the car in front of them without having them complain about other vehicles moving into that empty space. The "at least" is to account for other factors - such as high speeds.
toedtoes 07/21/21 01:04pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Speed limits

They changed the wording from "at least one car length per every 10mph" to "at least three seconds" because it is easier to figure out. I don't think that going down the road counting one thousand one, one thousand two, etc. and restart when another car pulls in front of you is easier than to estimate a car length behind a vehicle. in any event, there will not be any precision into any method is used to determine distance. bumpy Many people have difficulty estimating distances. And what "is" a car length? Is it a vw bug or a pickup or a sedan or a station wagon? Counting to three seconds takes those arguments out of the equation. is that count to three, or one onethousand, two two thousand, etc.? what cadence do you use? when that car length was used many years ago I would assume that it was for a standard sized vehicle so it would probably equate to 1.273 of today's vehicle length. bumpy :S You're just being silly now. Is that 1.273 of a fiat or a Suburban?
toedtoes 07/21/21 12:59pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Speed limits

Speed certainly isn't the only reason for crashes but it's been decades where it has been beaten into the American conscious that "speed kills", so not surprising, no one "claimed" is was low speed. Increase space sounds good but in foggy conditions, if you slow down more than most, that means you have more interactions with cars passing you (or creating long lines of closely spaced cars behind you). It's not a simple problem for a human driver to solve but if you are doing 25mph in a 70mph zone because of visibility, you should be getting off the road entirely (short of an emergency). Adaptive speed control that can see thru fog and react more quickly is our best bet for solving low visibility issues. Pile ups in foggy conditions are not because ONE person was driving 25. It is because too many people are driving 70 and driving too close to one another - all it takes is one vehicle to change lanes and a single car to hit their brakes and the chain reaction begins. None of those vehicles has enough space at the speeds they are driving to avoid hitting the car in front of them.
toedtoes 07/21/21 07:13am Tow Vehicles
RE: Speed limits

You are making your own conclusion that hasn't been shown. The data shows that you are more likely to Be IN A COLLISION if driving at the much slower speed. It does NOT show that the slow driving person is the CAUSE of the collision. Per the data from the NHTSA study, the CAUSE of that collision is most likely because the other driver was distracted, speeding, tailgating, not correctly judging the amount of space, overcorrecting, falling asleep, etc. You are still focused on finding fault. I'm talking about eliminating accidents. I don't care about "fault" I want to eliminate crashes. No, I am saying that the data does not suppoet your hypothesis that slow moving vehicles are the cause of collisions. If you want to eliminate collisions then increase the distance between vehicles regardless of speed. As long as people feel the need to ride one another's bumpers, there will be collisions.
toedtoes 07/21/21 06:59am Tow Vehicles
RE: Speed limits

They changed the wording from "at least one car length per every 10mph" to "at least three seconds" because it is easier to figure out. I don't think that going down the road counting one thousand one, one thousand two, etc. and restart when another car pulls in front of you is easier than to estimate a car length behind a vehicle. in any event, there will not be any precision into any method is used to determine distance. bumpy Many people have difficulty estimating distances. And what "is" a car length? Is it a vw bug or a pickup or a sedan or a station wagon? Counting to three seconds takes those arguments out of the equation.
toedtoes 07/21/21 06:53am Tow Vehicles
RE: Speed limits

I don't think that '1 car length per 10 mph' has been a recommendation for a long time. Mostly I have heard spacing given in seconds, not distance. And most do not mention that if you are following a car that can stop faster than you, you need to add time that you would be moving to the 2 seconds it takes you to react. In other words, a car 3 seconds behind a TT is likely not tailgating, but the TV pulling a TT 3 seconds behind the car probably is. They changed the wording from "at least one car length per every 10mph" to "at least three seconds" because it is easier to figure out. There was always a question as to how long a car length is? And it's difficult for folks to determine that measurement while driving down the road. The actual distance recommendation is still the same - 3 seconds generally equates to one car length per each 10mph. But most people can do that simple measurement of counting to three while driving. It changed in the mid to late 80s. Also, that is the mimimum recommendation. Nowadays, you'll hear " two seconds", but that was never the actual recommendation - that is a reduced distance to account for people in commuter vehicles who scream bloody murder if someone dares to merge into their lane during their commute home. It is better than no space, but closes up the open space in front of them so they are more likely to maintain it. It is used as a "bargaining chip" - "you should stay at least three seconds behind", "but all those other drivers will cut in front of me and I will never get home", "OK, then do two seconds. It's enough to give you time to react, but won't leave that huge empty space in front of you". And yes, I heard that conversation every time I took our required defensive driver course for work for the past 30 years. In reality, you want to stay at least three seconds behind the car in front of you. Other factors should increase that distance - weather, your vehicle's capabilities, road conditions, any impairment to your response speeds, etc.
toedtoes 07/20/21 07:33pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Speed limits

This is 1 reason I always say the best vehicle for first car is a regular cab small pickup with 4 cyl, manual transmission. The low power reduces chance of showing off. Manual transmission mean pay more attention to driving. The frame IMHO is better when (not if) they wreck. And most important; Think back, every time you got in trouble, or should of got in trouble, there was 3-4 friends in the car with you. The little cab reduces that chance. Dose of reality: that won't stop kids from being stupid. I've seen kids cram 6 kids in one of those cabs. And regardless of the actual power, they will speed, chase, and otherwise show off.
toedtoes 07/20/21 06:50pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Highway speeds - Keep your distance!

What really drives me crazy (literally) is following a slow vehicle on a curvy road where there is no opportunity to pass as I need a bit of a straightaway to get by with the trailer. Then when there is a passing lane the vehicle speeds up to 15 mph over the speed limit, preventing any attempt to pass. I guess they feel now that the road is straight they no longer need to be afraid to go the speed limit, or exceed it. I like my cruise control. I cannot tell you how many times I'll be driving down the freeway using cruise control and pass a slower moving vehicle only to have them suddenly speed up as soon as I am past them. Or, how many times I have had some driver race past me only to have them sit at the same traffic lights as me mile after mile. If I am the reason for the slow moving traffic, I will keep to a slower speed when passing lanes come along to let folks pass. I admit, when I'm driving my clipper, I do get annoyed with the guy behind me behaving all frustrated and tailgating because I am going too slow. When the passing lane comes along, I move to the left lane and pick up my speed passing the old toyota corolla going slow and end up driving faster than the guy who was behind me making a fuss. Don't assume I'm the roadblock just because I'm a big brick.
toedtoes 07/20/21 03:22pm General RVing Issues
RE: Speed limits

My Mom wouldn't let us drive home after getting our permits or licenses. Her observations showed a lot of kids getting into accidents on those two days - so she removed them from the equation. I can certainly agree on not letting a kid drive solo. I remember some states restricting driving with two young drivers. If one kid has an IQ of 100 and another gets in with an IQ of 100 the combined IQ would total out to about 60. bumpy My Mom didn't let us drive on those two days period. Even if she or my dad were in the car. She said too many of her friends let their kids drive home from taking the test and they got into accidents. She felt it was "tempting fate" to drive after the test. She also made us wait until we were 18 to get our licenses. Hsr excuse was that by waiting we didn't have to take driver ed (which at that time was not offered by the school nor was free). The truth is that it saved her two years of headaches and high insurance premiums.
toedtoes 07/20/21 03:07pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Speed limits

I haven't checked back to see if any body has mentioned it yet, but if every one dropped back the "recommended" spacing, 1 car length per 10 mph or whatever, you would end up with the traffic moving backwards as new cars got into the mix. bumpy Not true. It actually would result in a faster traffic. Traffic slows down because folks are unable to merge at driving speeds. If they want to merge into another lane, they brake and move over or move over and brake. That braking requires those behind them to brake. The driving speed keeps going up and down in exaggeration. In comparison, leaving the proper space between vehicles allows folks to merge at the driving speed. In order to maintain that distance, the car behind simply coasts for a few seconds. No braking required by anyone. The driving speed stays at a fairly stable rate of speed. Remember, as long as you are driving forward you are getting to where you are going. Every time you have to lay on the brakes, you are stopping your forward progress.
toedtoes 07/20/21 03:02pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Speed limits

As such, the report shows that no one stated "he was driving too slow" as the cause of the accident. Yet many many people stated they were distracted, speeding, tailgating, or had fallen asleep, etc. and that's why they hit the other car. What if the at-fault driver was tailgating because the other driver was "driving too slow"? Again, the cause is tailgating. Had that person left more room between cars, there wouldn't have been a collision. People drive at different speeds - it's not for one person to "punish" others by tailgating them until they move out of the way. If traffic is so congested that you can not safely go around the slow driver, then you need to slow down accordingly. If traffic is such that you can safely go around the slow driver then you should do so. There is no legitimate reason for tailgating. Keeping a safe distance from the car in front of you is Driving 101.
toedtoes 07/20/21 02:08pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Pay or No Pay?

See if working for Walmart gets you a free place to park with full hookups. I bet at that Walmart job you won’t have the ability to roll out of bed and be to work in 60 seconds. Seldom are the Walmart’s of the world located near national parks and other tourist destinations. I bet the work schedules aren’t as flexible and the jobs not as easy as most Workcamper positions. But if you attach no value to those points Workcamping is a bad deal. Agreed. But for many of us the choice is not between work camping or working at Walmart. My point was that I am not willing to work for less than market rate in order to increase someone else's profit margin. If the idea is just to cover living expenses, then I will spend a week a month working remotely at my real job, and have the other 3 weeks free to do what I want. However if the opportunity is fulfilling in some other way, say volunteering at a National Park then I am happy to straight volunteer, and if they give a free campsite, all the better. I agree with this. For me, workamping isn't meant to make money, it's a way to subsidize the camping. If I needed to make money, I would get a better job. If I wanted to spend 3 months in a great campground that had a 14-day limit and costs $26 per night, I would consider workamping to bypass the stay limit and drop the nightly cost.
toedtoes 07/20/21 01:55pm Workamping Forum
RE: Speed limits

While there may be no evidence that differential speed causes accidents, there is certainly empirical evidence that the greater the differential speed, the greater the potential for having accidents and the greater the severity of the accidents. Hence there is a reason why there is a minimum speed limit on freeways and why you can't drive your moped on them. Yes, there are minimum speed limits on freeways. But that minimum is "waived" all the time. Stop and go traffic, road work, icy roads, fog, stormy weather, etc. One person driving too slow may be annoying. But as long as others are driving an appropriate speed for the conditions and are paying attention, there will be no accident. It's when all those other "people factors" come in that accidents happen. Like the driver who chooses not to slow down but instead swerve around the slow driver on a crowded freeway. https://www.michigan.gov/documents/mdot/RC-1609_478401_7.pdf There is plenty of evidence. See pg7 of the attached (right side graph) - About 7mph above the average speed (not speed limit) is the safest speed, though obviously, everyone can't go 7mph above the average or the average would move. - 20mph below average is far worse than 20mph above average (around 3 times as likely to be in a crash). This graph is from the 1960's but I've seen similar studies that show the same basic pattern. Going significantly slower than average is dangerous. You are making your own conclusion that hasn't been shown. The data shows that you are more likely to Be IN A COLLISION if driving at the much slower speed. It does NOT show that the slow driving person is the CAUSE of the collision. Per the data from the NHTSA study, the CAUSE of that collision is most likely because the other driver was distracted, speeding, tailgating, not correctly judging the amount of space, overcorrecting, falling asleep, etc.
toedtoes 07/20/21 01:32pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Speed limits

When I took Driver Ed if any of the instructors caught you driving to Driver Ed, you automatically failed and had to wait a year to take it again. Many of us grew up on farms and had been driving big equipment and trucks for years before we were old enough to get a license. reminds me of when I went to the court house to take my test. I drove there on my learner's permit and my mom was with me. she went shopping, I went in the court house. when the officer giving me the test and I went out to the car he was surprised no body was with me. he did accept the fact that my mom had been with me and went shopping but I don't think I totally convinced him. :) bumpy My Mom wouldn't let us drive home after getting our permits or licenses. Her observations showed a lot of kids getting into accidents on those two days - so she removed them from the equation.
toedtoes 07/20/21 01:09pm Tow Vehicles
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