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Griff in Fairbanks

AK

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Posted: 01/12/18 10:46pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

You're welcome ... that's the mildest expression I use when dealing with what previous owners have done.

Your old power converter/charger has/had a large Iron-core transformer, with lots of copper wire. The new unit uses solid state electronics ... much, much better. (Lighter and more efficient.)

The charger function in your old unit was probably a manual charger ... constant nonstop voltage continuing even after the battery has boiled dry. (Manual charger = checking every 15-30 minutes to see if battery was approaching fully charged and unplugging charger when close to fully charged.)

The new unit should have, at a minimum, an automatic charger function ... senses when battery is close to fully charged and automatically turns off. (Automatic charger = connect, plug in, and forget ... intentionally.)

If you're lucky, new unit has a multi-stage battery charger function ... usually three stages of decreasing voltage ... bulk, float, and maintain. (Multi-stage charger = battery is 100 percent charged and ready to go when you are.)

On another note, my roughly 10-year-old iMac appears to have gone tango-uniform. No amount of coaxing can get it to do anything remotely resembling stable operation. (Computer stable ... operator never is.) Started last Monday when electric company decided to play yo-yo with the grid.

Tried posting this using our Wii-U ... got most of it composed when Wii had a hissy fit and froze up. (No damage to Wii-U ... can't say the same for my frustration level.)

Wound up using wife's system.

New Mac mini on order and should be here mid to late next week. Meanwhile, articles on hold, research on hold, email piling up, and steadily going crazy. (Okay, crazier.)


1970 Explorer Class A on a 1969 Dodge M300 chassis with 318 cu. in. (split year)
1972 Executive Class A on a Dodge M375 chassis with 413 cu. in.
1973 Explorer Class A on a Dodge RM350 (R4) chassis with 318 engine & tranny from 1970 Explorer Class A


Griff in Fairbanks

AK

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Posted: 01/13/18 03:33pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Trying to post using Wii-U again. (I know what went wrong on last attempt.)

I'm working on a companion article, Watts versus Lumens, for the Motorhome Electrical System series. Because I find other people's thoughts, opinions, and suggestions very helpful, I'm going to throw out some thoughts here.

Most people are familiar with the use of watts for defining the relative brightness of electric light bulbs and fixtures. However, the relationship between watts consumed and light emiitt
ed is, at best, very tenuous.

Watts is a unit of eletricity produced and consumed. The different types of electric light sources (incandescent, fluorescent, LED, etc.) has the largest bearing on the amount of light emitted per watt consumed. Likewise, differences in materials and manufacturing techniques has an impact on the apparent brightness of an electric light source.

So, two supposedly identical electric bulbs or fixtures, in terms of type and wattage, can be noticeably brighter or dimmer than each other.

Lumens is a precise unit of visible light emitted by a light source. Note 'visible' light. A key element in the scientific definition of a lumen is the human perception of light, based on what the average person's eyes can detect and process.

Uses watts (or amps) if you're concerned with how much an electric bulb or fixture is going to use. Use lumens if you're concerned with how bright the bulb or fixture will be.

Griff in Fairbanks

AK

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Posted: 01/14/18 08:26pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Various manufacturers, websites, and so forth have started using 1600 lumens as a comparison baseline. This is the approximate lumens emitted by a new 100 watt 120VAC incandescent light bulb.

Manufacturers have effectively ceased making and selling incandescent bulbs larger than 60 watts. Some special purpose incandescent bulbs, such as severe service, are still available. However, these and lower wattage bulbs are scheduled to be phased out as well.

(Major manufacturers probably already have plans in place to close their incadescent factories and transition them to CFL And LED bulbs.)

Obviously, it's hard to see how bright a 100 watt bulb is if you can't find one. Fortunately, most CFL and LED packages state, "Equivalent to 100 watt incandescent bulb. (Or, XX watt bulb.)

Some manufacturers have already transitioned to simply listing lumens on their packaging and websites.

BTW, automotive (12VDC) incandescent bulbs should remain available, largely due to how NHTSA regulations are written. Cost of these will likely rise due to decreased demand as motorists shift to LED lights.

Eric Hysteric

Hildesheim

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Posted: 01/15/18 02:48am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

You are right Griff, my "new" charger works more efficient and it loads the battery with an IUoU characteristic (3 phases) and it's noiseless, the old charger was always buzzing.

I am very happy about the led-technology. Economical, no heat and pleasant light color possible.

In summer i like driving old vespa sccoter and my problem is, that the automotive bulbs do not have the power consumption as the box (15W is not 15W but 13W or 17W. The alternator needs a precise resistance, because some old Vespas has no voltage regulators. I could bring the electronic up to date (voltage regulator with different wiring) but for original vehicles we have already a problem with incorrect watt consumption specifications.


'79 Dodge Sportsman 5.9 LA 360 TEC Campmate

Eric Hysteric

Hildesheim

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Posted: 01/15/18 06:54am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

A short question. I need a tip for an ignition coil. Want the old as a spare part and a new for the engine.
https://www.rockauto.com/en/catalog/dodg........d+v8,1075283,ignition,ignition+coil,7060

Griff in Fairbanks

AK

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Posted: 01/15/18 03:02pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Eric Hysteric wrote:

A short question. I need a tip for an ignition coil. Want the old as a spare part and a new for the engine.
https://www.rockauto.com/en/catalog/dodg........d+v8,1075283,ignition,ignition+coil,7060

That's okay ... but definitely keep the old one.

Working ignition coils rarely, if ever, go bad. If a working ignition coil does go bad, it usually means you have other more significant problems. They usually only go bad due to being subjected to long periods of excessive heat. (From engine heat due to tightly enclosed engine compartment, engine constantly running over-temp, or coil being subjected to extended periods of too high voltage.)

Note: I'm talking about the can-type coil used in our older motorhomes and many other vehicles. Some aftermarket performance coils can go bad over time and there's been some issues with coil-on-plug types. (Excess heat tends to be the cause with for coil-on-plug types, usually due to being too close to exhaust manifold.)

A new coil will usually fail within 3-6 months, usually due to manufacturing defect. (Basis for warranty replacement but cost of different coil is usually less than effort of pursuing a warranty claim.) If a new coil lasts more than 3-6 months, you can assume it's going to last forever.

I know a guy who's using a coil out of an early-50s Dodge, pulled out of a junkyard, in his early-80s Ford pickup. Doing so was initially an act of desperation and he intended to replace it with a new "Ford" coil. The 'antique Dodge' coil worked just fine and has continued to work for more than a decade of daily use. So, he decided to leave well enough alone and pursue other (real) issues. (He's a diehard Ford fan so I regularly tease him about a 'Dodge' coil getting his Ford to work.)

Regarding your Vespa -- you have two options:

1. Bite the bullet and upgrade to newer wiring and components.

2. Use the right size (in ohms and wattage) resistor in series to bring the system voltage in line with what the Vespa needs.

You're going to have to do one or the other at some point in the future. Automotive incandescent bulbs will probably be phased out within the next decade or so. Specifically, major manufacturers will cease producing them as people shift to LED bulbs and fixtures. The few that remain available will increase significantly in cost due to economic supply and demand.

You'll probably be among the first affected by this. EU is leading the vanguard banning less energy efficient light bulbs so you could, in the near future, be unable to buy incandescent bulbs. (Unless you import them from backwards countries -- like the U.S.)

* This post was edited 01/15/18 03:14pm by Griff in Fairbanks *

Griff in Fairbanks

AK

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Posted: 01/15/18 03:10pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Addendum: Can-type coils are one of those things that are all produced on the same assembly line(s). One of the final steps in the assembly process is to print a pentastar, oval, or bowtie (i.e., Mopar, FoMoCo, or GMC logo) on the coils,

This is the same as dual wheel rims with the same bolt pattern. The final manufacturing step was to stamp a pentastar or oval inside the rim.

Griff in Fairbanks

AK

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Posted: 01/16/18 04:35pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Eric is more 'correct' in using IUoU to describe 3-stage battery charging. I continue to use 3-stage because it's used more often in English language literature in North American. So, North American readers are more likely to recognize and understand it.

(I'm tempted to switch to IUoU and put 3-stage in parenthesis.)

Wikipedia has a good article on IUoU that doesn't get too scientific or mathematical, if you'd like to know more.

(I'm still on the Wii-U so I can't post a link to the article like I'd normally do.)

Leeann

Maryland

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Posted: 01/16/18 04:48pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

When does the new Mini show up? And what did you get? I'm on a quad-core 2012.

Unless the old coil didn't ohm correctly, definitely keep it as a spare. Ours was total **** and I pitched it (it actually was leaking), but most are fine. It's the plugs and wires that are the problem 99% of the time.


'73 Concord 20' Class A w/Dodge 440 - see profile for photo

Griff in Fairbanks

AK

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Posted: 01/17/18 04:21am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Leeann wrote:

When does the new Mini show up? And what did you get? I'm on a quad-core 2012.

Sometime between tomorrow and Friday. Getting the $700 middle of the line. Gonna have to stop playing Zelda BOTW so I can use the Samsung TV as a monitor. (Will get a monitor in the near future ... the mini put enough of a dent in our finances by itself.)

After getting super bored (and going slightly crazy) for over a week, I recalled the wife's old iMac still worked. We'd ripped the optical drive and internal hard drive out of it so it had/has to be booted from an external drive. (I actually tripped over the ****ed thing three times before I remembered that.) Gonna use that to make a cleaner transition to mini.

==========

Just about every ignition coil I seen go bad was leaking ... sure sign of coil getting over heated due to the reasons I stated. Don't know of one ever failing without leaking ... but just may have never encountered that situation.

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