Good Sam Club Open Roads Forum: Towing: dual cam & Equal-i-zer anti-sway
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 > dual cam & Equal-i-zer anti-sway

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duraeddy

Minnesota

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Posted: 11/11/06 08:38am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I'm trying to understand how the Reese dual cam and Equalizer hitches work.
1)Once properly set up, it looks like you can't adjust the amount of anti-sway?
2)Is the amount of anti-sway dependent on the tongue weight, amount of weight distribution, or something else?
3)What makes the Equal-i-zer anti-sway different from any other friction based anti-sway system.
Thanks for any help. Ed

BarneyS

S.E. Lower Michigan

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Posted: 11/11/06 09:06am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

1. Correct. Once you have the hitch set up properly, the only way to adjust the anti-sway of the Dual Cam is to take up another link on the chain which will put more pressure on the bars/cam interface but will also change the WD. This normaly should not need to be done however.
With the Equal-i-zer, you could tighten the nut on the hitch head for each bar socket but Equal-i-zer recommends a certain torque for those nuts and it probably should not be altered. You could also raise the "L" bracket but that would change the WD.

2. On the Dual Cam, the anti-sway depends on the tongue weight/WD to a great extent. They recommend a tongue weight of a minimum of 400lbs for it to work correctly. It depends on the friction, which varies as the bars ramp up or down on the cam. There is the least friction when the cams are resting exactly in the middle of the V of the bars. As you turn, or the trailer tries to sway, the cam pushes harder on the bar which increases the pressure/friction. The heavier your tongue weight, the better it works.
The equal-i-zer depends mostly on the friction at the hitch head where the bars insert. There is also friction at the "L" bracket point where the bars rest on it.

3. Really nothing. The only difference is that the Equal-i-zer provides a lot more friction control than a friction bar can.

Both hitches work well and have many loyal followers in these forums.
Barney

* This post was edited 11/11/06 09:22am by BarneyS *


2004 Sunnybrook Titan 30FKS TT
Hensley "Arrow" 1400# hitch (Sold)
Not towing now.
Former tow vehicles were 2016 Ram 2500 CTD, 2002 Ford F250, 7.3 PSD


Ron Gratz

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Posted: 11/11/06 10:51am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

duraeddy wrote:

---2)Is the amount of anti-sway dependent on the tongue weight, amount of weight distribution, or something else?

Both hitches rely on metal-to-metal friction to generate torques which work to control sway.

For the Equal-i-zer, when the TT tries to swing on the ball, the rear end of a WD bar will also try to swing. The trunnions at the front end of a bar will try to rotate within their seats and a direct torque will be produced. The magnitude of this torque depends on the tightness of the adjusting nut at the top of a trunnion socket. The magnitude of the torque also depends on the amount of vertical load applied to the rear end of a WD bar.

The Equal-i-zer produces additional torque indirectly via friction between the rear end of a WD bar and its L-bracket. If the TT tries to swing, an L-bracket will try to move fore/aft relative to its WD bar and the front of the WD bar will exert a fore/aft force on its trunnion seats. Since the trunnions are some distance from the hitch's centerline, a torque will be induced on the hitch. The magnitude of this additional torque depends on the amount of load on the rear end of the WD bar.

The DC generates a longitudinal tension/compression in its WD bars via friction between the rear end of a bar and its cam. This tension/compression produces a push/pull force on the trunnion seats which induces a torque on the hitch head. The amount of torque does not depend directly on tongue weight. The amount of torque does depend directly on how much vertical load is applied to the rear ends of the WD bars. However, this vertical load is usually related to the tongue weight; so there can be an indirect relationship between tongue weight and magnitude of sway control torque.

For the DC, the amount of sway control provided is highly dependent on the amount of load applied to the WD bars. For the Equal-i-zer,
the amount of sway control provided is only partially dependent on the amount of load applied to the bars.

Ron

Ron Gratz

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Posted: 11/11/06 11:35am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

duraeddy wrote:

---3)What makes the Equal-i-zer anti-sway different from any other friction based anti-sway system.
Thanks for any help. Ed

The Dual Cam is a friction based anti-sway system. I discussed how it differs from the Equal-i-zer in my previous post. I do not know the magnitudes of anti-sway torques which can be generated by these two systems; but, I'm working on that.

A difference between Equal-i-zer and Dual Cam which I did not address is how the sway control affects the ability of the TV and TT to realign once they have developed a relative yaw angle. The Equal-i-zer will produce the same resisting torque whether the TT is trying to move away from the "centered" position or moving away from it. The DC, by virtue of the sloping surfaces on the ends of its WD bars will provide more resistance to moving away from center than to moving toward center. Some see this as an advantage in helping to get the vehicles realigned after a lane change, rounding a curve, etc.

The Equal-i-zer differs from a friction-bar anti-sway system in two important ways:
1) It can generate anti-sway torque directly via the trunnions and seats, and
2) It can generate much more torque.
A friction bar simply produces a tension or compression in the bar which, in turn, pushes or pulls on the ball to which the end of the bar is attached. This generates a torque on the hitch which helps to control sway.

The most commonly used friction bar has an adjustment which determines how much tension/compression it can produce. The magnitude of this is factory-set at 1100#. The center-center distance between the friction-bar ball and the main ball is 5.5". Therefore, at the factory setting, this friction bar can generate about 500 ft-lbs of torque. If you installed one of these bars on each side of the A-frame, the pair could generate about 1000 ft-lbs.

One difference between the friction-bar control and the DC and Equal-i-zer is that the friction force on the friction bar can easily be "turned off". Some people believe this is an advantage when towing in reduced-traction conditions.

Ron

Chuck&Gail

In the Colorado Mountains

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Posted: 11/11/06 12:09pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I had a friction type sway bar and WD setup before getting my Equal-i-zer. One pull and you can tell the BIG difference., I would never again use a friction type sway bar. IMO they are truly inferior.


Chuck
Wonderful Wife
Australian Shepherd
2010 Ford Expedition TV
2010 Outback 230RS Toybox, 5390# UVW, 6800# Loaded
Not yet camped in Hawaii, 2 Canada Provinces, & 2 Territories
I can't be lost because I don't care where this lovely road is going

Ron Gratz

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Posted: 11/11/06 12:45pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Chuck&Gail wrote:

I had a friction type sway bar and WD setup before getting my Equal-i-zer. One pull and you can tell the BIG difference., I would never again use a friction type sway bar. IMO they are truly inferior.

Chuck,

I would be very interested in seeing some "performance" experiences for one friction bar versus two friction bars versus Equal-i-zer.

Did you by any chance try adding a second friction bar before switching to the Equal-i-zer?

Ron

6MISFITZ

Fort Erie, ON, CANADA

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Posted: 11/11/06 01:50pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

An Equal-i-zer hitch does not have to be disconnected prior to negotiating tight turns (such as into some gas stations or a or U turn if you miss the campground entrance) like you would have to with the add on sway brake style or risk damaging it/them.

Equal-i-zer or Dual Cam are much more effective than the add on style even with 2 add on sway brakes.

Mike.


Mom, Dad, 4 kids, 2 Camping Dogs
Express 2500 LS (135"WB) 6.0L, 4.10, G80, PYO wheels, HENSLEY & McKesh
--------------------
MISFITZ RACING
MFCC Member
Rallies Attended 4, 7 Un-Rallies


diesel57

Wisconsin

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Posted: 11/12/06 03:21pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I have had "dual friction bars" for the last 7 years. I have absolutely zero sway. I have always been perplexed by the volumes of postings on this site about sway. I just do not see sway as an issue and I have "Quality S" (I think it is an import)and two friction bars.Nevertheless, I will upgrade (I sure hope it is an upgrade)to am equalizer this winter.


2006 3500 Mega Cab, CTD.Jayco 264 Bunkhouse.

JBarca

Radnor, Ohio, USA

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Posted: 11/12/06 04:44pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Durraeddy

Ron and Barney have given you the fine and top line points of the 2 hitches. They are both good hitches. And both have limitations.

As you are investigating this do not allow your self to think that either one of these hitches will correct for an out of balance TT or an under sized TV.

While the hitches will help over come some sway characteristics of a bad setup, the TT MUST be solid on it's own and not sway going down the highway with no outside forces acting on it. Proper TT loading, tongue weight, TT balance, along with axle placement and tire/axle alignment create natural low sway characteristics in the TT. The TV needs it's own optimization as well. Wheel base, tire inflation, proper WD, within mfr ratings to name a few.

POINT: Do use either hitch within it's limits but use it for the days when things act against you to help keep sway in check. Do not use it as your main line of anti sway defense. Neither hitch will overcome an out of balance rig.

There are some mechanical purchasing differences between the 2. The Reese HP trunnion style hitch and DC utilize a 1,700# hitch head where you can use 600,800,1200 and 1700# spring bars with it. So if some day you need a heavier bar, you just change the bar providing the hitch shank is rated correctly.

The Equalizer is designed to a weight limit surrounding the spring bars. If you end up needing a heavier bar, you have to rebuy the entire hitch.

Pending personal preference the Reese uses chains and the Equalizer uses frame brackets. Both change the loading of the rear of the spring bar. Each loyal hitch user will state theirs is better because...

Hope this helps.

* This post was edited 11/12/06 05:09pm by JBarca *


John & Cindy

2005 Ford F350 Super Duty, 4x4; 6.8L V10 with 4.10
CC, SB, Lariat & FX4 package
21,000 GCWR, 11,000 GVWR
Ford Tow Command
1,700# Reese HP hitch & HP Dual Cam
2 1/2" Towbeast Receiver

2004 Sunline Solaris T310SR
(I wish we were camping!)


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