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 > Avion truck campers - Hundreds of photos

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67avion

Carbondale, Illinois

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Posted: 10/10/19 03:09pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I'm posting these for Rasta. I sure hope that they work. This is from his construction of an Avion C10 (I think)

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* This post was edited 10/10/19 04:19pm by 67avion *





D1trout

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Posted: 10/10/19 03:19pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

D, here’s a quick idea to address your problem. I’ll expand on it if it interests you. 1. Clean all the dead wood out. 2. Make a full sized paper pattern carefully following the curves at the front. 3. Get either an 1.5” piece of coosa board or some thinner sheets you can bond together. 4. Cut out the pattern on the coosa. 5. Shape the outside edges of the coosa to roughly match the curved molding at the outside of the cabover. 6. Make a thickened epoxy putty compound and butter the outside edge of the coosa then press the coosa firmly into the bed space. The epoxy putty will fill the voids and bond everything nicely all around the edges, creating a rigid floor completely moisture proof and 30% lighter than plywood. You might do the same with sheets of plywood carefully epoxy coated before you install them. Much cheaper than coosa...
If this an approach that appeals to you, I’d be happy to expand on it. The devil’s in the details of course...

67avion

Carbondale, Illinois

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Posted: 10/10/19 04:14pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Dick, that sounds interesting though I tend to shy away from too much epoxy bonding - worrying about the day I might have to take it apart again. But, please do tell me your ideas. Here are some small issues:

1) Build a proper platform to fit under the cab over that allows for the weight of workmen during the construction. It should also keep the base of the cab over as close as possible to the tolerances of space in the completed floor.

2. Determine how to anchor the edges with the greatest strength. Clearly Avion cared about that with their monster chunks of wood.

3. How did the idea of drilling from above work? Was the top lowered down without the skin - fastened on the edge - and then the skin was riveted? I can't do that.

4. Now that I have the bottom of the cab over open what should I do in terms of caulk and sealant? TremPro Polyurethane. Parbond?

5. What are the weight considerations - and constraints? How heavy is too heavy since that limits my material choices - as Dick has indicated.

That's enough for now. We have set aside the construction after spending the day joyfully tearing everything apart. Even Hula the Wonder Dog won't jump inside at this point.

It'll be next week before we take it up again.

Onward!

D1trout

San Francisco Bay Area

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Posted: 10/10/19 11:01pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

OK, D, let me expand a bit. Get rid of ALL the old wood and foam. Sounds like you might have done that already...
A simple plywood platform under the cabover on the outside will support the work inside.
Now you’re looking at an empty space, the sides of which curve from horizontal to vertical. You’ve still got the inner skin attached vertically. The screws that were penetrating the plywood are sticking down into space. Cut them off. Take some builders paper and carefully create a paper pattern that fits snugly around the entire bunk space. The outside edge of the paper pattern should stop where the upward curve of the molding begins. Then draw the curve and calculate how that curve will extend the upper part of the floor material to fit snugly into the curve in the aluminum molding. Don’t obsess about this curve. West Systems 6/10 epoxy adhesive will fill and attach everything quite securely when the time comes to fit the new floor. Cut the paper pattern in half front to back.
Coosa board is super light and strong composite material, waterproof and easily shaped, and a great replacement for plywood. It’s pricey. Ck it out for yourself. It’s the best material for the job but you could use exterior plywood and bond sheets together to make the 1.5” thickness you’ll need. Use West epoxy and a foam roller to bond the sheets and to coat the whole assembly before you install it. When you have dry fitted the two halves in place and are generally happy with the fit, trowel epoxy all over the bottom of the plywood, butter the outside edges of the new floor generously with 6/10, and butter the joint where the two halves come together down the middle. Put the two halves in place and press to fit. Smooth and clean up excess epoxy, adding more to fill any gaps around the outside edges. Then place weight on the new floor til the epoxy kicks.
After the epoxy kicks, drill holes from the outside up through the bottom of the curved molding, interspersed with the original rivets (or maybe drill out every 8th rivet or so) thru the new floor and thru the aluminum channel that forms the bottom of the vertical portion of the cabover. Use long rivets to secure this connection. Go to Hanson Rivets on the web and look at extra long blind rivets. You’ll find what you need. They deliver fast. With these rivets you can fasten the floor to the vertical part of the cab in a way that will not fail. Don’t get caught up in the idea that using epoxy will complicate things if you have to go back in. You won’t have to go back in with this repair. That’s the whole point - repair it once.
I put 1/8” white gelcoated fiberglass wall panels from Lowe’s on top of my cabover bunk. It’s a pebble finish and easy to wipe clean, lightweight and waterproof. And cheap. Screw it down to the coosa or plywood. Caulk around the edges and you’re done.
Let me know if you have questions! Be courageous! Onward!

67avion

Carbondale, Illinois

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Posted: 10/12/19 07:23am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Let me get back on this after I think about it for awhile. Thanks!

67avion

Carbondale, Illinois

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Posted: 10/22/19 11:47am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

OK, D1 we've consulted and your suggestions are the best. We plan to use 3/4" Coosa board sandwiched with thin foam and 3/8" plywood to fit the Channel that surrounds the interior cabover.

We hope to shape the sandwich so that it slides into the edges. The channel will be filled with epoxy.

We also want to make the floor one piece which may raise some issues as to how to handle it inside the coach not to mention how to get it past the upraised metal that had supported the frontispiece. There are also 2 triangular pieces on either side that have to be navigated. One of which had supported a fan. We will remove both of them. The "wrap around" that was on the front of the boards facing the back of the cabin was saved and we should get that back on. it will cover up the work that we did in the bending etc.

Do you recommend epoxy on the floor?

In dealing with the West Marine epoxy how much will we need and how much time will we have to fit in the Coosa board and the rest of the sandwich? And....fasten from below?

[image]

We will drill through the exterior channel from below to gain support from the frame. The old screws will be replaced in their original screw holes after we have caulked.

[image]

I'm looking for a supplier of Coosa Board in the St. Louis or Indianapolis area (or maybe Nashville) as well as West Marine epoxy.

D1trout

San Francisco Bay Area

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Posted: 10/22/19 09:43pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Dang, D, there’s that “P” word again! Why put plywood back into an area where it failed?
Composites and synthetics are so bulletproof that I don’t understand not using them in a situation like this. Granted they are more expensive - significantly more - but you’ll only have to do this repair once.
Always a chance I’ve misunderstood your intentions. You mention a coosa, foam, plywood sandwich. Can you describe this in a bit more detail? I suppose if you carefully coated the plywood with epoxy and caulked any penetration carefully, it might outlast you, but to my mind, why worry...?
On to particulars, I’m not certain how you can make the floor one piece under your circumstances. That’s why I suggested cutting the layout in half along the long axis of the camper. If you’re concerned about joint failure, you could overlap the (at least) two layers of flooring so the seams were offset six or eight inches with each layer. When you layer each board in, whatever material you decide on, you should be epoxying it to the layer below, like a peanut butter sandwich...
That will create a stiff, permanent floor for the cabover. As for the corner obstructions, you’ll just need to be creative!
West Systems epoxy (not to be confused with West Marine, the retailer), is the state of the art product for this project. Go to their website and you will find excellent product descriptions and instructional guidance. YouTube has many worthwhile videos on using the material in various applications. You want to focus on the 105 Epoxy system. You can choose from three different hardeners to get things to set up at a speed that you’ll be comfortable with. My advice is to go slow. Hurrying invites error.
As for quantities, I can’t really give you much guidance without being on hand.
I have attached pics of the curved molding so you can accurately shape the ends of the new floor to fit as snugly as possible on the outside edge. Once you slide the floor into the outer curve with thickened epoxy to bed it, you will have a bombproof repair. Using screws instead of rivets to pull the bottom aluminum layer of the shell up into the flooring is certainly an acceptable solution. I suggest truss head stainless sheet metal screws, well caulked.
As for final finish on the floor of the bed, a coat of epoxy would be the simplest. You will have coated it anyway in the assembly process. You could then paint it if you wished. Adding more material just increases weight. As I said, I used the 1/8” x 4’x8’ white fiberglass shower and kitchen panels from Lowe’s, but I have a different setup than you will have.
I have a cutoff of the curved molding from my build. Ck out these pics. Let me know if any other views or dimensions would be helpful.
[image]
[image]
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Scratch your head about all this and let me know what you’re thinking. It’s a process and you’ll come up with a solution that will do the job and will be (mostly) in your comfort zone Also, shop around for West epoxy. I think prices vary.
Onward!

D1trout

San Francisco Bay Area

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Posted: 10/23/19 06:38am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

D, if you like, I’ll send you this scrap of molding to help you contour the outside edge.

67avion

Carbondale, Illinois

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Posted: 10/23/19 07:52pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Well, Dick, I'd like that moulding. It should be a great help. We're cogitating over this and hope to make our move before the winter storms.

roamlab

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Posted: 11/09/19 08:41pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

We also rebuilt our cab over using a fiberglass composite material. We bought new aluminum and epoxied it right to the bottom of the cab over bed (in addition to the wings and sides). Replaced the bottom screws with 314 stainless steel. It's been very solid even after extending it to accommodate north-south sleeping and doing some pretty rough roads (we just did the Rimrocker trail over the summer). You can see some of the details here.

* This post was edited 11/10/19 10:22am by roamlab *


ROAM LAB
Digital nomads on a perpetual road trip
1970 Avion C11 truck camper (renovation In progress)


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