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 > What tools to take on 2 month trip?

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krobbe

West Michigan

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Posted: 06/01/15 05:49am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

K Charles wrote:

People drive 1000 miles to work and back every month without tools but can't go 1000 miles in a straight line without worrying about a breakdown. If it is road worthy and maintained you should need nothing. Take some plastic and have fun.

If you're prepared(even new stuff breaks), then not as much "plastic" is needed. And who wants to wait several hours for someone to rescue you on the side of the road? Being prepared also allows me to help others.


Me'62, DW'67, DS'04, DD'07
'03 Chevy Suburban 2500LT 4WD Vortec8.1L 4L85-E 3.73 CurtClassV
'09 BulletPremier295BHS 33'4" 7200#Loaded 1100#Tongue Equal-i-zerHitch Tires:Kumho857
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ljr

Pennsylvania

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Posted: 06/01/15 06:31am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

gbopp wrote:

Duct tape. Don't forget the duct tape......


It's an old joke but...

For things that move and shouldn't; duct tape.

For things that don't move and should; WD40.


Larry

Atlee

Mechanicsville, VA

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Posted: 06/01/15 07:10am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

There is a heck of a difference in 1000 total miles traveling to work and return, and 1000 miles in a straight line (more or less) with a RV.

I took generators and an air compressor when I went to the west coast and back. Why? A lot of times I was a long way from service vehicles. For example, I checked my trailer tires while camping in Death Valley. One was low. Without the compressor, I'd have had to called in a some repair outfit to come into DVNP to air up my tires. I'd have had to floated a loaned to pay for that.

So it's not the same.

K Charles wrote:

People drive 1000 miles to work and back every month without tools but can't go 1000 miles in a straight line without worrying about a breakdown. If it is road worthy and maintained you should need nothing. Take some plastic and have fun.



Erroll, Mary, Duffy the Dachshund (RIP)
www.thetravelingkoala.blogspot.com
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And Blue Ox WDH/Sway Control

Dick_B

Palos Heights, IL USA

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Posted: 06/01/15 07:15am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

An impact wrench is handy for changing tires with the appropriate sockets. An extension for the torque wrench is handy for tightening the lug nuts. Too hard to get way to them without one.


Dick_B
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APT

SE Michigan

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Posted: 06/01/15 07:26am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

pira114 wrote:

I don't mean to sound like a jerk, I really don't mean it that way. But when people ask me what tools they need, I assume they don't know how to use them. So I say take a credit card.

What I mean is that if you knew how to work on trucks and trailers, you'd likely already know what tools you're likely to need. So take a basic home tool set for quick tightening and pounding jobs. Credit card for the rest. Know your limitations. I know what I know, and I know what I don't know.


I tend to agree. If you don't have a semi portable toolbox already or know how to diagnose things, a credit card will solve most problems.

My toolbox has deep well sockets, open/box end wrenches, adjustable, monkey, screwdrivers, hammer, multimeter and a few other odds/emds I picked up. I also have a socket set with SAE and metric and 3/6/9" extensions. These go on every car trip. For RVimg, I also take small hydraulic jack/stands because 8 tires doubles the risk. Tt is better when I can fix something myself in 10 minutes to keep us moving and not waste vacation time. For larger issues, credit card.


A & A parents of DD 2005, DS1 2007, DS2 2009
2011 Suburban 2500 6.0L 3.73 pulling 2011 Heartland North Trail 28BRS
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coolmom42

Middle Tennessee

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Posted: 06/01/15 08:35am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

krobbe wrote:

Spare fuses for both TT and TV. (a couple of each size)
Voltmeter
A pack of screws for the cabinet hinges and other things(#6, #8, #10)
Gorilla Glue
grease
A combo screwdriver that includes the various tips(square, star, slotted, phillips)
channel locks pliers
hammer
large ratchet set that includes a 1/2" drive socket to fit lugnuts
1/2" drive torque wrench to torque lugnuts(100#)
bottle jack(10 or 12 ton)
cordless drill(for the TT stabilizer jacks) and bit to fit same
a good air pressure gauge (you have a compressor)
good voltage surge protection
motor oil
coolant(mixed 50/50)
windshield washer fluid
leveling blocks (I carry 2 sets of the orange ones)
comfortable chairs
beer and wine


And most of this can be purchased at any Walmart, as needed. Carrying all that doesn't leave much room for anything else.


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rbpru

North Central Indiana

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Posted: 06/01/15 08:56am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Here is my standard answer based on my trip to MT last year.

I practiced, took and used the following.
• Lower your TV spare tire and make sure the crank has not rusted tight.
• Make sure you have a real TV spare tire that can handle the load, not a “donut” type spare.
• Make sure you have a spare TT tire.
• Make sure you have the jacks and blocks to change the TT tire.
• Know where to place the jack and practice changing the tire. Jacking a TT can be a daunting task.
• Tire air gauge.
• Carry a torque wrench.
• I had a small 120 volt air compressor to top of the tires if needed.

The DW and I took a 6000 mile trip out west last year; we had a TV flat on the way out due to a rock puncture and a TT flat on the way home from a piece of metal. Both tire changes resulted in a 20 to 30 minute delay; rather than being stranded on a road side waiting for Road Service to find us.


Twenty six foot 2010 Dutchmen Lite pulled with a 2011 EcoBoost F-150 4x4.

Just right for Grandpa, Grandma and the dog.


GaryWT

MA

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Posted: 06/01/15 09:00am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

For any trip no matter the distance I have a hammer, adjustable wrench, pliers, a screw driver and a lug wrench. That is about it.


ME '63, DW 64, (DS 89 tents on his own, DD 92 not so much), DS 95
2013 Premier Bullet 31 BHPR 2014 F350 Crew Cab 6.2L 3.73

krobbe

West Michigan

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Posted: 06/01/15 09:36am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

coolmom42 wrote:

krobbe wrote:

Spare fuses for both TT and TV. (a couple of each size)
Voltmeter
A pack of screws for the cabinet hinges and other things(#6, #8, #10)
Gorilla Glue
grease
A combo screwdriver that includes the various tips(square, star, slotted, phillips)
channel locks pliers
hammer
large ratchet set that includes a 1/2" drive socket to fit lugnuts
1/2" drive torque wrench to torque lugnuts(100#)
bottle jack(10 or 12 ton)
cordless drill(for the TT stabilizer jacks) and bit to fit same
a good air pressure gauge (you have a compressor)
good voltage surge protection
motor oil
coolant(mixed 50/50)
windshield washer fluid
leveling blocks (I carry 2 sets of the orange ones)
comfortable chairs
beer and wine


And most of this can be purchased at any Walmart, as needed. Carrying all that doesn't leave much room for anything else.

I'll be sure to break down in a Walmart parking lot next time. [emoticon]

Campfire Time

Wisconsin

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Posted: 06/01/15 10:12am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

You are far more likely to pick up a nail in a tire than have a blow out. I recommend a tire plug kit. True, that is not the ideal way to repair a puncture. But if you are traveling on a Sunday or there are no nearby shops open, you can get the tire roadworthy in 30 minutes.

krobbe wrote:

K Charles wrote:

People drive 1000 miles to work and back every month without tools but can't go 1000 miles in a straight line without worrying about a breakdown. If it is road worthy and maintained you should need nothing. Take some plastic and have fun.

If you're prepared(even new stuff breaks), then not as much "plastic" is needed. And who wants to wait several hours for someone to rescue you on the side of the road? Being prepared also allows me to help others.


Not to mention that If if I break down close to home, I can get a tow home and work on it later. Traveling back and forth to work is a whole different dynamic than towing my trailer on a long trip. Note the quote in my sig. I want to have fun, not adventures.


Chuck D.
“Adventure is just bad planning.” - Roald Amundsen
2013 Jayco X20E Hybrid, 2008 GMC Sierra SLE1 Crew Cab Z71


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