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 > Chainsaw ?

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southstanley

East Coast

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Posted: 01/31/18 08:18pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Makita UC4051A Electric Chainsaw. The main disadvantage though is that you don’t have full freedom, as you have a cable attached on your machine, but, as people say, don’t judge the book by its cover.

It has a compact, efficient motor that delivers up to 2600 RPM and it comes with a chain bar of 16”, great for firewood cutting.

* This post was edited 01/31/18 08:28pm by southstanley *

tony lee

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Posted: 02/01/18 12:20am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Bowsaw. Since we don't ever have campfires it is just for the very occasional need to trim some branches


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TxGearhead

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Posted: 02/01/18 11:33am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

A bowsaw works well, but...if you already have a set of cordless tools...drill, impact, etc., look at that brands sawsall. I've got Dewalt cordless tools and their sawsall. It worked well to cut a 6x6.


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DrewE

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Posted: 02/01/18 12:48pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

TxGearhead wrote:

A bowsaw works well, but...if you already have a set of cordless tools...drill, impact, etc., look at that brands sawsall. I've got Dewalt cordless tools and their sawsall. It worked well to cut a 6x6.


Nearly as quick (in my experience, at least) for firewood cutting and pruning as a reciprocating saw (Sawzall) is the Corona razor tooth pruning saw. It's a lot quicker and so easier than a bowsaw, and quite reasonably priced. The reciprocating saw, at least for me, tends to bog down on things much larger than an inch or so because the stroke isn't long enough to clear out the accumulating sawdust.

A decent real chainsaw is, of course, a whole lot faster than either one.





SideHillSoup

South Eastern British Columbia

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Posted: 02/01/18 01:02pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

In BC you can cut fire wood, however you need to have Free permit from the Forrest service office in the area that you want to cut wood in. You just go into a BC Forrest service office ask for a fire wood permit, and they will tell you where you can cut and where you can’t cut. The permit is more for keeping track of who is cutting trees in a location, and they also will tell you where they don’t want you cutting like active logging roads ( safety against you getting whacked by a logging truck on some tight switch back... )
I should also add that you can’t cut or even pick up off the ground a branch or any other part of tree in BC Provincial parks or any Canadian National park. Lots of people do, but your not supposed to..... ( bad...)

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crosscheck

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Posted: 02/01/18 06:23pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

SideHillSoup wrote:

In BC you can cut fire wood, however you need to have Free permit from the Forrest service office in the area that you want to cut wood in. You just go into a BC Forrest service office ask for a fire wood permit, and they will tell you where you can cut and where you can’t cut. The permit is more for keeping track of who is cutting trees in a location, and they also will tell you where they don’t want you cutting like active logging roads ( safety against you getting whacked by a logging truck on some tight switch back... )
I should also add that you can’t cut or even pick up off the ground a branch or any other part of tree in BC Provincial parks or any Canadian National park. Lots of people do, but your not supposed to..... ( bad...)

Soup.


To answer the OP question asumming they are talking about camping and not domestic firewood gathering, never. Truck camping, a medium sized bowsaw will rip through fairly large sized logs(10"), and for backpacking/wilderness canoe trips, a collapsible bow saw which can cut up to 6" logs, 4" optimum.

I am not advocating breaking local laws but many of the National and Provincial parks we have backpacked in over the last 50 years all have well used steel fire rings at campsites many km from the trailhead. No one is packing in their firewood plus all of their other camping items in the many hours it takes to hike to these developed sites. Where does the wood come from?

Dave


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trailerbikecamper

eastern Canada

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Posted: 02/01/18 06:28pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I have used my chainsaw to take down damaging trees. The latest was a couple of weeks ago. A tall tree was split vertically and if it fell during wind, it would most likely land on either my or BIL camper. Called owner of campground. He did not feel comfortable in the event that it came down in the wrong direction.

Took my truck and some tow chains. Wrapped the chain as high as possible, tensioned chain and cut the tree down. One caveat with this method; make sue the chain is long enough so the tree won't land on the truck. Electricity is turned off for winter so electric saw is not an option.


Dan

SideHillSoup

South Eastern British Columbia

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Posted: 02/01/18 09:06pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

crosscheck wrote:

SideHillSoup wrote:

In BC you can cut fire wood, however you need to have Free permit from the Forrest service office in the area that you want to cut wood in. You just go into a BC Forrest service office ask for a fire wood permit, and they will tell you where you can cut and where you can’t cut. The permit is more for keeping track of who is cutting trees in a location, and they also will tell you where they don’t want you cutting like active logging roads ( safety against you getting whacked by a logging truck on some tight switch back... )
I should also add that you can’t cut or even pick up off the ground a branch or any other part of tree in BC Provincial parks or any Canadian National park. Lots of people do, but your not supposed to..... ( bad...)

Soup.


To answer the OP question asumming they are talking about camping and not domestic firewood gathering, never. Truck camping, a medium sized bowsaw will rip through fairly large sized logs(10"), and for backpacking/wilderness canoe trips, a collapsible bow saw which can cut up to 6" logs, 4" optimum.

I am not advocating breaking local laws but many of the National and Provincial parks we have backpacked in over the last 50 years all have well used steel fire rings at campsites many km from the trailhead. No one is packing in their firewood plus all of their other camping items in the many hours it takes to hike to these developed sites. Where does the wood come from?

Dave


Dave....
It doesn’t matter if it is fire wood gathering or bring in 6 cords of wood for the winter.... you still need the permit to cut dead or alive trees......
In national parks as well as B.C. provincial parks, fire wood gathering is a no no.... yes. As I said people do it... and Dave you are correct.... back woods camping well off the grid, you can gather fire wood and use it to cook and keep warm.... I apologize for that error....
But the question was chainsaws.... and Dave if you have ever back packed up the bush for what ever reason,,,,, a chainsaw is not the tool I wood take to cut anything...would you?
Hence the posters question.....( chainsaw)
Dave....I’m telling them the Rules..... they can do what they wish, what happens if they get caught .....IF they do something wrong, it is their problem.
And please tell me where in BC you have found a steel fire ring many km’s from a trail head?
Maybe a fire pit...built of rocks..... but highly unlikely a steel fire pit with out road actress, where a backpacker would haul in a chainsaw....
Just trying to help people Dave,
If you have more facts and rules on tree cutting ( fire wood gathering ) that I don’t know... please share them with me and the rest of the world.
Soup.

sue.t

Ibex Valley, YUKON

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Posted: 02/01/18 09:43pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Same in Yukon - a permit is needed to cut trees for firewood or to take down standing dead trees. You also need to ensure you are not on First Nation settlement lands if you plan to take any of the resources from the land.

The territorial campgrounds provide free firewood for users of the campgrounds, and the overnight fee is only $12.

Also, if you have a campfire in the wilderness, be sure you put it completely out. When we're out in the back country, we've often come across campfires that have been abandoned and are still burning. Please don't do that! Fire risk has been high in recent years.


sue t.
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crosscheck

Coldstream, BC

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Posted: 02/01/18 09:54pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

SideHillSoup wrote:

crosscheck wrote:

SideHillSoup wrote:

In BC you can cut fire wood, however you need to have Free permit from the Forrest service office in the area that you want to cut wood in. You just go into a BC Forrest service office ask for a fire wood permit, and they will tell you where you can cut and where you can’t cut. The permit is more for keeping track of who is cutting trees in a location, and they also will tell you where they don’t want you cutting like active logging roads ( safety against you getting whacked by a logging truck on some tight switch back... )
I should also add that you can’t cut or even pick up off the ground a branch or any other part of tree in BC Provincial parks or any Canadian National park. Lots of people do, but your not supposed to..... ( bad...)

Soup.


To answer the OP question asumming they are talking about camping and not domestic firewood gathering, never. Truck camping, a medium sized bowsaw will rip through fairly large sized logs(10"), and for backpacking/wilderness canoe trips, a collapsible bow saw which can cut up to 6" logs, 4" optimum.

I am not advocating breaking local laws but many of the National and Provincial parks we have backpacked in over the last 50 years all have well used steel fire rings at campsites many km from the trailhead. No one is packing in their firewood plus all of their other camping items in the many hours it takes to hike to these developed sites. Where does the wood come from?

Dave


Dave....
It doesn’t matter if it is fire wood gathering or bring in 6 cords of wood for the winter.... you still need the permit to cut dead or alive trees......
In national parks as well as B.C. provincial parks, fire wood gathering is a no no.... yes. As I said people do it... and Dave you are correct.... back woods camping well off the grid, you can gather fire wood and use it to cook and keep warm.... I apologize for that error....
But the question was chainsaws.... and Dave if you have ever back packed up the bush for what ever reason,,,,, a chainsaw is not the tool I wood take to cut anything...would you?
Hence the posters question.....( chainsaw)
Dave....I’m telling them the Rules..... they can do what they wish, what happens if they get caught .....IF they do something wrong, it is their problem.
And please tell me where in BC you have found a steel fire ring many km’s from a trail head?
Maybe a fire pit...built of rocks..... but highly unlikely a steel fire pit with out road actress, where a backpacker would haul in a chainsaw....
Just trying to help people Dave,
If you have more facts and rules on tree cutting ( fire wood gathering ) that I don’t know... please share them with me and the rest of the world.
Soup.


I never said I have more facts and rules on tree cutting. I had to look up the rules for Provincial and National parks. What I was trying to get across is that there are permanent steel fire rings in Provincial and National parks far from trail heads that are well used, meaning, lots of fires. If the authorities really were wanting to Inforce the regulations, there would be no permanent fire rings and signs stating, no fires or wood gathering. Dead wood is being harvested near these campsites for fires all the time.

To answer your question on these fire rings, one of the many backpack trips over the years we have done, was from Waterton to Jasper( still have to finish to Kakwa PP). It is called the Great Divide Trail. Many campsites in the Provincial and National parks had permanent fire rings with no road access. This is just one of many backpacking and wilderness canoeing trips we have taken over the years. Many go through Provincial and National parks and backcountry wood gathering and fires are very prevalent.
I am not here avocating breaking rules, just giving my observations on what i have seen in the many years tramping around in our big country.

Dave

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