Good Sam Club Open Roads Forum: Rebuilding "Ms. Merry" The Amerigo - Updated 8/3/2020
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 > Rebuilding "Ms. Merry" The Amerigo - Updated 8/3/2020

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JoeChiOhki

Sauvie Island, OR

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Posted: 08/31/19 03:31am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Saturday, August 31, 2019

Rebuilding “Ms. Merry” the Amerigo–The new Loo–Part 2

Ms. Merry is continuing to look more like a usable camper with each update [image]. This time around, we’ve been working on getting the sewer plumbing in place, allow for at last, the installation of Merry’s new holding tank and the sewer and vent lines that go into Merry’s new bathroom [image]!


[image]
The first step we had to tackle was getting Merry’s new holding tank in its final position and the inlet flanges located for the new toilet and the vent line that would be going up through the shower (Painted white like a column, similar to how we did it in Mr. KIT in The Great Bathroom Remodel. The difference in Merry being her vent pipe will go from floor to ceiling, where-as in Mr. KIT, it only had to go from counter top to ceiling.

One thing I love about Ms. Merry’s new holding tank is unlike Mr. KIT’s whose was made of polypropylene and required spin welding to attach anything, Ms. Merry’s is ABS plastic, which simply requires cutting the holes for the flange and then gluing it in place, much much easier!

You’re likely wondering what the white compound is around the outer dump valve, that is water proof (below water line) epoxy putty, which was used to pack in the remaining gap between the flange the T- fitting between the two main valves. I had hoped when I removed the studs and glued the valve on that it would be a tight enough fitting that it would be water tight, sadly, it still leaked a little bit, which the epoxy took care of.

The valves are currently in the wrong alignment in the picture, they’re going to all be repositoned so that the pull handles point down so that the handles can extend through the floor of the heated compartment and are accessible underneath so they can be accessed without having to add a second hatch to the compartment floor that might come open during travel. The main valve bodies will be up in the heated and insulated tank compartment, allowing them to remain warm during winter use.

[image]
Once we got the flanges in place, the next step was to install the floor insulation, cut out the pass through holes for the pipes and install the spacer ring to the underside of the floor that the tank would be anchored to. The spacer was necessary to give the flange on the top of the tank and the bottom of the offset flange enough room to be able to fully join, as the flange extends down an additional inch and a half below the floor.

The offset flange was needed to allow the toilet to be fully situated back near the wall in the bathroom, and keep the whole valve and dump connection assembly to remain inside the tank compartment and kept warm. During winter use, we’ll likely need to make a water proof packing ring to stuff in around the sewer hose as it comes out through the compartment hatch so that the warm air being suppled by the furnace isn’t lost to the outside entirely.

In the picture, only the initial screws were installed to hold the spacer in place while the tank was being positioned for flange installation. Once the flange work was done, the tank was removed and additional 3” screws were drive in all around the spacer to fully anchor it into the floor. The tank was then later reinstalled to this spacer ring with lag screws and wide fender washers all around its perimeter to permanently anchor it into place securely enough to handle the liquid movement force of a full holding tank while the camper is moving.

Once the toilet flange and other pipes are in place, the tank will then be filled completely and left full for 24-48 hours to check for leaks an anchor failure.

[image][image]

With the tank finally in its permanent home, we started plumbing the lines going into the tank, starting first with the grey water lines going up through the floor, where the first T connects the pipe to the drain line come from the shower before going up to a second T that takes the feed coming from the bathroom sink and then later traveling on to the kitchen sink at the front of the camper.

[image][image][image][image]

Originally, I had planned to use a HepVo valve instead of a standard P or U trap on the shower’s drain line, however, after unpacking the HepVo valve, it was very clear that the membrane in it would end up slowing the shower flow too much to work properly and with the spacer ring providing additional space between the floor and the tank, there was more than sufficient room to simply cut an additional hole in the floor for the U Trap to drop into above the tank, allowing for the use of standard plumbing practices instead of the rubber membrane HepVO valve. A Inlet valve or “Cheater Valve” was installed at the top of the drain line, though the access hole still needs to be cut so that it can be serviced if at some point in the future it fails.

The use of a inlet valve in this space, allows for the air inlet to be inside the camper, a second one will be installed on the line going to the kitchen sink, allowing for the complete removal of one of the roof vent holes in the roof, allowing me to permanently patch that spot in the camper’s roof and reduce the number of potential leak points on the camper’s roof. Ms. Merry’s original ceiling showed the signs of water entry around the original vent when we were demolishing the original interior.

As the pipes were installed, standing full pipe water tests have been performed to ensure that none of the joints in the new system leak. A final full system standing water test will be done once I pick up some test plugs to make sure that the there are zero leak locations.

[image][image]
The pipe coming up through the floor on the left is the tank vent, which the tank inlet can be seen in the picture of the unmounted tank.

You can see more clearly why the offset toilet flange assembly had to be used in order to connect the toilet to the tank without losing vast amounts of precious bathroom floor space.

The white piece of pipe on the end of the long pipe running across the floor on the right, is a piece from the Hepvo valve kit that I reused, as it fits the threads of the new stainless steel shower drain and threads right into a standard inch and a half FPT connection. The Valterra drain unfortunately will not directly thread into a FPT connection and a comparable match from the hardware store has the same issue, neither is designed for direct threaded connection, unlike the original flanges the camper had (The shower flange broke into pieces during removal as all the original flanges were made of plastic), necessitating the use of the elbow assembly from the hepvo as a normal slip fitting with a regular elbow is too tall to fit in the narrow confines below the shower floor.

You can see the elbow more clearly in the second picture below. I will be building a little access hatch into the bottom of the front walls of the shower so that I can easily access the shower drain flange for servicing in the future.

I ended up needing to add a 3/4” spacer to the floor frame to lift it up even with this so that the drain line going the shower had a proper downhill slope to ensure proper drainage. Like the other fittings, this too, was standing water tested and fed water as fast as I could pour it in to make sure that the drain did not slow. The water on the floor underneath it is due to the fact that the fittings on the drain were not fully tightened at the time of testing as I did not want to weaken the seal on the rubber O-ring that seals the elbow to the drain by fully tightening it until it was time for final permanent installation.

The shower floor will need to be removed at least a couple times more to allow for the installation of the heater vent line and wiring for the “See-Level” tank sensor system for the holding tank. Once those two parts have been completed, the holes for the carriage bolts that will permanent clamp the shower floor in place will be installed, and the aluminum flashing installed around the perimeter so that the floor and side walls can be fiberglass sealed in place. The final floor finish will be made of a sheet of FRP “orange peel” texture which will be epoxied into place over the top of the underlying fiberglass coating.

I will also be working the floor area in the front section with a grinder to properly slope the pan down to the drain so that all water is directed into the drain. The pan as a whole is sloped already via the underlying floor framing, however a low point needs to be still made to help the final water direction into the drain. The opening was already recessed for the drain flange and will be sloped down to that.

[image][image]

A 2x2 support lip will be glued and screwed to the underside of the front of the floor once all under floor work is done, this will then be anchored into the remaining bathroom walls so that the floor is fully supported and strong enough to take my weight. As I wasn’t able to completely eliminate the rear butt sag, the shower pan’s support structure was designed to compensate for the sag in the rear so that the bathroom toilet sits level, but has just enough slope to allow for water to be directed properly to the drain. I modeled the slope degree and direction after the original shower pan that had come with the camper.

And that’s it for “The New Loo – Part 2!” [image]


My Blog - The Journey of the Redneck Express
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'1992 Dodge W-250 "Dually" Power Wagon - Club Cab Long Bed 4x4 V8 5.9L gashog w/4.10 Geared axles
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JoeChiOhki

Sauvie Island, OR

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Posted: 06/21/20 02:14am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Sunday, June 21, 2020

Rebuilding “Ms. Merry” the Amerigo– And the Story of the Flimsy bed–Part 1

So, once again, Ms. Merry and Jake the Pickup have slumbered through another soggy miserable Oregon winter, hoping that this year, THIS year, the Fat Man in the Orange Dodge hat with the power tools will finally be finished rebuilding Merry so that they can all escape from the Madness that has been 2020 and go to the more important places, the places where there’s more fish than there is people, because the Fat Man has grown extremely tired of people and their stupidity and would prefer the company of his wife, their cats, their camper, and a lot of fish and very few people.

This brings us to today

For the past few weeks, the Fat Man in the orange hat has been collecting supplies again to make sure that they have enough materials to work on Merry for the next couple months without needing to deal with crowds of people. In the years past, The Fat man wouldn’t be bothered by them, but with the world darkened by a new sickness from China, the Fat Man has been spending many tiring months working and doing little else than walk from bed to the work computer, sit there for twelve hours, then go back to bed, with food sometimes mixed in between. The never ceasing rain has not helped the Fat man much, so any sliver of it not being a dreary, drippy day on the weekend (The weather has been doing a fine job of being nice on those long days when he’s trapped inside working, and returning to absolute piss when the weekend finally arrives for the last two months), he grabs.

Today, he decided to finally start tackling Ms. Merry’s Snap-N-Nap rear bed, the very last piece of Ms. Merry that hadn’t been changed since he brought her home several years ago. It is still “resplendent” in its spray glued vinyl covering that at one time was white, but has yellowed and aged, and tacky 70s paneling. He has many plans, plans to remove the original accordion sides and replace them with a single hinged fold down side that latches in place on the rear shell, allow the bed to have a thicker mattress and to fix the design flaws that rely on the rubber rain covers for the hinges to close gigantic holes in the corners of the snap-n-nap when its folded open.

Little did he know what new madness he would discover……

------

Hello, again, everyone! Its been a long time since I last worked on Jake and Merry, and as I dramatized above, its been a rather poor winter and the world’s been a festering disaster since February, and I’m looking forward to trying to actually get them finished this year. With me working from home part of the week and part on, being able to dive into work on Merry as the weather stabilizes will be a nice change.

So, the story of the Flimsy Bed (AKA the Who-thought-this-was-a-good-idea! Bed).

I call it this, because I’ve either found a ludicrous design choice that Gardner Industries made to cut corners and pinch pennies that could of potentially led to a lawsuit, or the last missing part in the Oil Embargo special that seems to have highlighted Merry’s original construction from day one of this restoration project.

Since I was starting back into the home stretch on Merry, I decided that I would start the year by completing some of the last big lift items that still needed doing, the Snap-N-Nap being a big one that’s still as it was when I bought the camper. I had always planned to remove the nasty, tacky vinyl and reinforce the bed pan because my earliest observations were the aluminum frame and door skin were really not strong enough to handle an adult sleeping in that bed much before things started to break. Part of that plan involved reinforcing the floor by adding additional support structure as much as reasonable without making the bed too heavy, a proper plywood floor, and changing the accordion wings to a properly sealing design.

Most Amerigo owners pride themselves on that rear bed with its automatically opening and closing wings, however, in almost all cases, the thin thermoformed plastic shells are almost always disintegrating by the time any of us get ahold of them and while they can be glued and patched, that plastic is still brittle and forty years or more old. So, my plan was to completely remove them, and make a solid single hinged wing that would fold up against the “ceiling” of the Snap N Nap and be held in place by a sliding latch, one of the same ones that would later be used to latch the wall in the down position after the bed was opened so that it compressed tightly to the new sealing surfaces and make the snap-n-nap airtight and water tight to the elements, something the original design was lacking and tried to make up for with large amounts of vinyl.

Unfortunately, like everything else in Ms. Merry, the wooden anchor bar at the top of the snap and nap sides was installed with those damnable double inward crescent security screws. Since said screws just went through a piece of one by one cheap yellow pine, I just drilled holes in the wood near the screw heads through the piece and then wedged a flat head screw driver in the hole to split the wood and separate it from the screws, allowing me to pull the side down, so I could then use a 1/4” socket on my drill to disassemble the rest of the accordion for removal.

What I wasn’t anticipating to find was that the only thing attaching the bed pan to the outer clam shell of the snap-n-nap was these flimsy plastic accordion sides that have no structural frames at all inside them. I expected there to be a second piano hinge along the top far edge of bed pan that attached it where it met the clamshell so that the bed was hanging from the rear wall and the clamshell at two points with the sides just being attached so that they would automatically open and close.

[image][image]

Investigating behind the rotten vinyl I can even feel what appears to be a 1x4 piece of wood embedded into the fiberglass of the clam shell at the height where that piano hinge should be. I don’t know, as these pictures are the first I’ve ever seen of the inside of an Amerigo’s Snap-N-Nap accordion sides, if this was by design, which makes little sense, given the wood you see in the pictures isn’t even attached to one another, they simply line the edges and are held inside the clam shell by a couple staples through the plastic. There is absolutely no way these were mean to the load of that bed and its occupant, there’s simply not enough structural integrity to them to do that.

I might have believe it possibly the case, had these been welded aluminum frames or the wood was actually attached to one another, but there is literally nothing structural to these, and I seriously cannot believe a company would think a thin strip of Vinyl would be enough for a load baring hinge.

My only conclusions I can draw are, there was a hinge that was supposed to have been installed, it never was. Some previous owner removed it and never reinstalled it, but there’s no evidence of one ever having been installed.

[image]

Directly behind that vinyl below that screw strip is that "potential" 1x4 piece of embedded wood. The bed pan is currently hanging low on this corner because the side has been removed. I’ll be setting up a cradle tomorrow to support the bed pan so I can fully detach the clam shell from it and set about installing the missing hinge.

From what I’ve peaked behind the vinyl I’ve pulled free, its a very real possibility I may need to glue a 1x2 frame onto the fiberglass to give me a surface to anchor the RV wall paneling to to install it.

So, welcome back to the restoration adventure, I’ll try to post updates as often as I can, so stay tuned!

* This post was edited 08/02/20 11:22pm by JoeChiOhki *

JoeChiOhki

Sauvie Island, OR

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Posted: 06/22/20 12:08am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Sunday, June 21, 2020

Rebuilding “Ms. Merry” the Amerigo– And the Story of the Flimsy bed–Part 2

Part 2 of the ongoing rebuilding saga of Ms. Merry's Snap-N-Nap! When we left off yesterday, we'd discovered that the flimsy plastic of the accordion wings was all that was holding the bed pan to the outer clamshell of the Snap-N-Nap bed, which wasn't exactly a very strong setup.

We'd hoped that after doing some more digging in the interior that we'd find another piece of wood fiberglassed into the wall of the outer clamshell that was supposed to have a piano hinge attached to it to bear the load of the bed, unfortunately, during today's investigations, what we thought was wood was actually just dirt inside in hollow cavity that was formed in the fiberglass to allow wiring to run for the tail lights, so sadly, we're going to need to rebuild the wings as they were.

Since we can't change the design, I decided to go with rebuilding the wings from scratch and building them so that they're a proper structural piece made of a laminated truss.

To start, I used the dismantled wings to trace out the pattern of the original design on some thinner door skin plywood I had on hand for this sort of thing, then cut out two new uppers and lowers.

[image]

The wings were made out of this sanded plywood because we'll be coming back once these are fully laminated together and finishing the exterior sides and frame edges with fiberglass resin and then painting it with a glossy polar white epoxy paint to match the sides of the Ms. Merry.

Compared to pre-made filon, these are thicker and much more structural stout. The center of the Uppers and Lowers will be filled with foil-sided Polyisocyanurate insulation foam which will be glued and laminated in as part of the wing structure.

For the main structure, I used 1x4 and 1x3 lumber to make the frame, with 1x4s used along the edges that would be getting clamped in place when the bed is deployed so that latched could be attached to the wings allowing me to remove the hinged clamp boards that were used originally in the camper.

[image]
A quick side by side of the new lower and the original with its non-structural loose wooden interior pieces. That wood is only attached loosely to the outside plastic, and what was bearing all the load of the deployed bed pan and carrying the load into the outer clamshell structure.

The only thing carrying all that weight is that disintegrating plastic, it literally was crumbling under my fingers, I am truthfully amazed the bed didn't drop out, when the Snap-N-Nap was used for storing building materials in the past couple years.

Another side by side, and yes, the new wing is built the right direction. Gardner Industries used the same wing piece for both sides, so on one side the seam of the overlapping plastic faced inwards, on the other it faced outward. With the thin fiberglass insulation removed, you can see the original color of the Snap-N-Nap wings, and how much they've yellowed in the last forty-five years!

[image]

Ran out of time today to get the last upper assembled, but all the pieces were cut, and tomorrow I'll be able to finish the assembly and start cutting the new insulation and trace out the inner skins.

[image]
[image]
And here's one of the new sides test laid out on the workbench [emoticon]. I'll likely trim the little corner on the upper so that it ends flush with the lower (This is an exact trace of the sides, and they're not the same size, and there's no real purpose to one being half an inch longer than the other).

These should be a tad stronger than the flimsy plastic originals and I won't have to worry about them catastrophically failing while on a trip.

* This post was edited 08/02/20 11:23pm by JoeChiOhki *

mountainkowboy

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Posted: 06/23/20 12:26pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Your as bad as I am.....LOL. I plan on tearing the S&S apart again to "finalize" the upgrades/mods/repairs that we planned on 12 years ago.


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1990 F350 S/C Lariat Dually (Red)
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JoeChiOhki

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Posted: 06/24/20 10:52am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

mountainkowboy wrote:

Your as bad as I am.....LOL. I plan on tearing the S&S apart again to "finalize" the upgrades/mods/repairs that we planned on 12 years ago.


The section here is the only part I hadn't refurbished/restored of Ms. Merry in the process, its still all 1975 Original, including the mattress, which is solely hanging around because I need the cover from it to use as a template for the new one for the new mattress.

Given we planned to have adults sleeping in that bed, its very good that we discovered the structural deficiency in how the bed is supported at the edge furthest from the back wall.

mountainkowboy

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Posted: 06/24/20 05:52pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

JoeChiOhki wrote:

mountainkowboy wrote:

Your as bad as I am.....LOL. I plan on tearing the S&S apart again to "finalize" the upgrades/mods/repairs that we planned on 12 years ago.


The section here is the only part I hadn't refurbished/restored of Ms. Merry in the process, its still all 1975 Original, including the mattress, which is solely hanging around because I need the cover from it to use as a template for the new one for the new mattress.

Given we planned to have adults sleeping in that bed, its very good that we discovered the structural deficiency in how the bed is supported at the edge furthest from the back wall.


Yep....a labor of love!

silversand

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Posted: 07/01/20 04:58am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

.....bloody good work, Matt! I'm still following. Nice restore!

Cheers,
Silver-


Silver
2004 Chevy Silverado 2500HD 4x4 6.0L Ext/LB Tow Package 4L80E Michelin AT2s| Outfitter Caribou

JoeChiOhki

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Posted: 08/03/20 02:10am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Sunday, June 28, 2020

Rebuilding “Ms. Merry” the Amerigo– And the Story of the Flimsy bed–Part 3
Alrighty! While the date on this reads June 28th, its actually been about a month since I last updated this blog! Lots of works been getting done, so let's get caught up! [emoticon]

[image]

When we left off, we were rebuilding Ms. Merry's Snap-N-Nap Wings, as the originals were a trash design that we've yet to figure out the logic of.

So, we've been recreating them using proper laminated wood truss-type construction with a 1x3/1x4 inner frame, a thin plywood exterior.

[image]
Now that we've got the body of these made, we've installed 3/4" Polyisocyancurate foam board in the center (Yes there is glue between the other side of the foam board and the outer plywood, and now we're laminating on the Finished RV wall board that will be the interior facing side of the wings [emoticon].

[image]
Since we can't really hide the staples we use for anchoring the wall board in place while the adhesive cures for the inside, the solution has been to apply the adhesive to all the gluing surfaces, then temporarily clamp the panel on the mirror side of the section we're working on so that we can flip the inner wall sides facing each other and make a compression clamp sandwich of the two, using the wing pieces to give us a nice tight bond.

These will be left to cure for about 24 hours in this state so that the glue properly sets up before removing the clamp sandwich.

[image]
Because I'm working on a few different areas of Ms. Merry at the same time, the second sandwich got set up on the roof of Beasley the Bambi-Slayer's roof while the work bench got used for other tasks [emoticon]

For those that haven't met Beasley, Beasley is my donor Suburban for my next vehicle project, the restoration and 4x4 conversion of Charlie Blue, my childhood family car that I grew up with.

I bought Beasley off a neighbor who paid to have him brought back from Southern California sight unseen only to discover Beasley was going to be a bigger project than he was hoping for, so I bought Beasley off him to donate his 4x4 parts, and drive train components to finish getting Charlie Blue back to road worthy status.

[image]
Now, that the panels have had a couple days to finish curing, we can tape up the corners of the RV wall panel side so that over run from the base coat of fiberglass resin won't get on the nice wall paper sides of the wings.

We'll be removing the tape after the first coat has had enough time to setup to were it can be touched, but still soft enough that we can remove the excess by simply peeling the tape of.

We'll be applying multiple layers of fiberglass resin, along with the cloth after this base coat, as the base coat is simply meant to seal the pores of the wood.
[image]

The results of the first fiberglass coat, looking shiny! We'll fix that with some nice sanding to prep it for the application of coat number two, and the fiberglass cloth around the edges.
[image]

And sanding is complete!
[image]

JoeChiOhki

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Friday, July 3, 2020

Rebuilding “Ms. Merry” the Amerigo– And the Story of the Flimsy bed–Part 4

During Part 3, I mentioned that other work was going on while the glue and fiberglass cured on Ms. Merry's new Snap-n-Nap Wings, so in Part 4, we'll cover the work going on inside Ms. Merry's Snap-N-Nap to prep for the installation of the new wing walls [emoticon].

To start off, here's Merry's Snap-N-Nap Bed with the mattress finally removed! The pan wood is actually in better shape than I was expecting, given the mildew smell that this area had been hanging onto. Turns out the smell was actually coming from that nasty fabric wall covering they'd used.

[image][image]

The paneling on these sides was held on with a couple small pan-head screws and a very minimal amount of adhesive, I basically just had to push a putty knife between the wood and the aluminum and popped right off.

[image]

Time to start getting that nasty vinyl fabric wall mess out once and for all..... To remove it, I simply ran a box knife along the joints to cut it and pulled it out by hand. The vinyl is carpet foam backed type stuff and is only held on with spray adhesive. As I tore it off, I discovered that moisture had gotten in around the window at some point and had soaked into this nasty fabric as the back of it was stained with old mildew and mold spots.
[image] [image]

Yay.... more spray foam.....That's all going to have be scrapped off so we can come back later and install some wooden framing along the perimeter for installing proper insulation board and wall paneling later. Mercifully, a rubber mallet and a putty knife pops it off the fiberglass in nice big chunks, leaving little residue behind.
[image]

The wooden "floor", and I use that term loosely, was simply held in by two 1/4" headed hex head screws, with them removed it lifted right out. Sadly, I forgot to take a picture of the laughable 1/8" thick fiberglass insulation mat that was underneath the aluminum sheet that makes up the bed pan's outer skin and the wall paneling floor that was in place.
[image]

So, my next discovery of stupid was the fact that they had glued the wiring for the tail lights on the inside.... to the foam.... Which makes zero sense, because there's a nice cavity specifically for pulling wires inside of, formed into the fiberglass wall!!!
[image]

Fixing this wasn't hard, just annoying, as I had to remove the new tail lights had I installed a couple years back so I could run my fish tape through the wiring cavity and re-pull the wires like they should have been done from the factory. Also took a moment to drill a new entry hole into the top edge of the cavity so that the wires going up to where they pass through the bulk head would be able to be placed behind the new wall insulation.
[image] [image]

This also gave us a moment to remove the original plastic license plate light/mount, which some tourist decided to help themselves to the original Washington License plate a couple years ago by breaking off the lower part of the mount. I'll return in a later chapter to show the new one installed after sealing the original holes and installing the new steel mount.
[image]

Once the wiring was taken care of, I set about cutting 1/2" polyisocyanurate foam insulation to put in the voids in the bed pan frame (there was no insulation here from factory). As its wasn't practical to remove the aluminum skin that makes up the outer skin of the bed pan, and because there's nothing on the outside of the bed pan on the back section that's up in the clamshell, we'll push the insulation in place in those sections later.
[image] [image]

Using the original pieces as patterns, I traced out new wall paneling and reinstalled in into place along the perimeter walls.
[image] [image]

And this is the new bolstering floor frame that is being installed in the bed and and will be sandwich anchored to the original aluminum framed pan floor, which was way too thin to safely support an adult sleeping in this bed. This floor, which is based upon the design and materials used in the cabover floor of Mr. KIT, which supported two adults sleeping on it for years, will be more than durable enough for the single adult that will generally be using this bed. So far, its been weight tested up to 380lbs (AKA I crawled on it) without any bowing or buckling, and this was before the insulation or plywood floor was glued and anchored on top.
[image] [image][image]

More 3/4" polyisocyanurate foam board [emoticon]. In case folks are wondering why I use this type of foam, its because unlike polystyrene foam found in most RVs, it has nearly double the RV value for equivalent thinkness. Most of Ms. Merry's walls are rated at at least R10 or higher, where the same thickness in polystyrene only yields R4 at best. Since we do alot of camping in cooler temps, bolstering the insulation factor of the walls will help keep the furnace from having to cycle on as much while dry camping or urban boondocking.
[image] [image]

And last, but not least, the new plywood floor is in [emoticon]
[image] [image]

This wraps up Part 4, but there's still much more to post! So stay tuned, I'll be adding more in the upcoming days. [emoticon]

mountainkowboy

Socal > NE Oregon

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Posted: 08/04/20 04:56pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Nice, that's going to last forever!

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