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 > My Ford E350 running a bit hotter

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rgnprof

Oklahoma

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Posted: 06/15/18 07:58am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I spoke with a radiator shop here locally yesterday - really nice guy and quite helpful. He seemed to indicate that the Spectra radiators were pretty good and that you can't tell as much anymore just based on whether it's advertised as a 2 row, 3 row etc, because, depending on the manufacturer, the tubes are larger sizes in some. In reading online, the issue of 'number of rows' does not appear to hold the same importance today as it used to.

We'll see...

ryan

DRTDEVL

Las Cruces, NM

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Posted: 06/16/18 06:29am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Yes, 8* re-tarded timing will definitely contribute to overheating.

I have an old Buick Apollo with a built Olds 350 rocket under hood. I figured out my distributor's advance wasn't working anymore by the temperature gauge. One day, it just started running hotter. I have electric fans, and it would still overheat in traffic or just running at idle for extended periods of time. While the engine was built with greater than 30* max advance in mind, the distributor's advance failure was holding everything down to about 4*. I swapped the dizzy, and the car runs beautifully again.

Go ahead and take that test lap again. I bet it runs at normal temperature, makes more power, and gets better fuel economy than it has in a while.


Resurrecting an inherited 1980 Minnie Winnie 20RG from the dead after sitting since 1998..


j-d

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Posted: 06/16/18 07:11am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

rgnprof wrote:

...you can't tell as much anymore just based on whether it's advertised as a 2 row, 3 row etc, because, depending on the manufacturer, the tubes are larger sizes in some...


That's about what I was told back well over a dozen years ago. I thought our OEM radiator needed cleaned, cored, something based on 20 years and 100000 miles. Then a friend gave me another OEM radiator that I think was three or four row, and had leaking tubes where somebody was trying to get that long alternator bolt (that I've mentioned before) out. Took it to a shop wanting it cleaned, tested, and a couple tubes in that damaged area cut out to be able to remove that bolt.

Brought out a new two-row in a very dirty box. Apparently bought for some customer/project that was canceled and never returned. Said "This is a High Efficiency design, and I can sell it for less than a core."

I think the two tubes were closer spaced (more of them) and "longer." By that I mean the length of the openings of the two tubes, fore and aft, was about 50% more (fore and aft, looking in the radiator cap hole) than OEM. Beyond that, I only know it worked.

Haven't heard it discussed, but it seems to me, that there can be Too Many Rows. Say you go to Six. The upper and lower tanks won't fit six, but say they could... There's gotta be a point where more tubes interfere with air flow through the core. Maybe even limit circulation because so many tubes could mean the flow through the core loses consistency, making more tubes less effective...

Drive it, Ryan. It's looking like you'll be OK. Do you think it got out of time with that cylinder head job you did?


If God's Your Co-Pilot Move Over, jd
2003 Jayco Escapade 31A on 2002 Ford E450 V10 4R100 218" WB

rgnprof

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Posted: 06/16/18 12:49pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I'm going to have it out next weekend so we'll see how it goes.

I had to pull the distributor when I pulled the driver's side head to repair the exhaust manifold. Marked everything when I pulled it and thought I got it back in the same, but clearly not...

One question related to this - I only had the one head rebuilt by a shop here in town - do I, or should I pull the other head as well and rebuild it...?

ryan

j-d

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Posted: 06/16/18 02:01pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

rgnprof wrote:

I only had the one head rebuilt by a shop here in town - do I, or should I pull the other head as well and rebuild it...?


You mean That Head, the One I tried to get you to pull and service as a pair when you had the Other One off for broken bolts?

Let's see what the others say. For me right now:
If it Ain't Broke Don't Fix it.
If it were mine, at this point I wouldn't tear that far into it without a reason. While it was apart for one head, yes I'd normally do both. I'm not sure new vehicle warranty does, and I heard rental fleets don't. But the vehicles in question are usually close to new, with relatively low miles.

rgnprof

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Posted: 06/23/18 07:13pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Got distracted by another problem and forgot to report on this issue...(see my electrical problems thread). Anyway, I don't think this has made much difference - didn't drive the coach for a long time and it wasn't terribly hot out, but the thing still appears to be running hot. Gauge got to M, maybe A and temps at upper hose/thermostat was about 208 and at the bottom hose it was 189ish...

I believe I might pull the thermostat and double check its operation.

rgnprof

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Posted: 06/29/18 09:25am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

In draining enough coolant to pull the thermostat, I decided to just pull the radiator and take it to a radiator shop. Looking inside I noticed a lot of grime (the guy at the shop said it looked like maybe someone had used stop leak - I NEVER have). But he also said it looked like it had too much stuff in it for a radiator that was less than a year old.

I'm trying to decide on if, and how I should go about flushing the block now, since the thermostat and radiator are out of the vehicle. I know many have said to never run regular water through - even to flush - and I know that some water will remain in the block after the flush.

Would you guys just pour distilled water through, or just leave it alone? I'm going to have to blow some air through as well, I'm assuming...

ryan

rgnprof

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Posted: 06/30/18 09:39pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Well, 'problems come in 3's' or 'when it rains it pours'...take your pick.

Think I finally got a handle on the engine overheating issue and was just getting ready to leave for Colorado and now my E4OD transmission has gone out!

I went to get LP and the guy working at U-haul (old retired mechanic) said it sounded like my u-joints were going out. He crawled under and checked but said they were fine, but you could a loud metal clang/clank when the coach was put in gear. I drove it to our church building - ran fine on the highway.

Tonight I decided to take it for a spin - just to be sure. Metal sounds much more noticeable and very hard to back up unless I give it a lot of gas, then a LOUD metal clank. Didn't lose reverse and coach drove back to the church (about 5 miles) without a problem, except now it's overheating again and when I got here it was leaking trans fluid from the bell housing plug.
Temps got up above 210 (and it's very cool here tonight - mid 70s).

I can hear the pump I guess and nothing sounds or feels right! Not sure what my options are. A friend here said it sounded like the torque converter has gone bad...

Options?

ryan

* This post was edited 06/30/18 09:54pm by rgnprof *

T18skyguy

Eugene, OR

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Posted: 07/01/18 09:14am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Once I took the radiator out of my RV to do the water pump. While it was out I laid it flat and poured a soap solution on it and gave it a good hosing all over the outside. I was amazed the amount of dirt that came off. My coolant gauge was noticeably lower after I did this.


Retired Anesthetist. Pilot with mechanic/inspection ratings. 2017 Jayco Greyhawk 31FS .Wife and daughter. Three cats which we must obey. Thorp T18, tons of tools and tons of junk.

DiskDoctr

PA

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Posted: 07/01/18 10:17am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Sounds like a rattle can of marbles? If so definitely torque converter.

Problem is...when it goes, it throws junk into the transmission [emoticon]

If you're not a "transmission guy" (I'm not), either find one or commit to replacing transmission, torque converter and cooler (yep, junk gets in there, too)

Sorry for your troubles. Glad you found it NOW, Colorado mountains are unforgiving and EAT transmission [emoticon]

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