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Bumpyroad

Virginia

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Posted: 01/11/18 04:33am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Gdetrailer wrote:

Acampingwewillgo wrote:

You really went to all that trouble and writing to debunk CB radio.... wow!?? ??


If it helps someone from wasting their money, time and effort with a totally useless outmoded form of communications it was well worth my time and energy.

To many folks have watched way too many 1970s movies like Smokey and the Bandit to many times..

In a twist of irony 25 or more yrs ago, my local Amateur Radio club used to ask the local "CB Club" to help assist with Hamfest parking duties..

The CB club used (get this), $40 Maxon 49Mhz hand helds INSTEAD of CBs!

Yep, even the CB club recognized the short comings of POOR CB Band communications and spend money to buy a bunch of 49Mhz handhelds.

I am not sure but I think that CB club disbanded 15 yrs ago or so, they haven't been at the local Hamfests for yrs..

Yep, a dead horse medium that folks love to put back on life support..


all those years and you didn't hear one smokey report??????????
"only" a 6 mile range????????????????? that's enough for me to talk to oncoming truckers.
$30 will buy one. quite frankly I DGAS if a CB club disbanded or not.
did you remember to turn it on?
bumpy





Airstreamer67

Pineville, LA USA

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Posted: 01/11/18 05:23am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Quote: "If it helps someone from wasting their money, time and effort with a totally useless outmoded form of communications it was well worth my time and energy."

This sounds like a quote from a "Ham" who is disdainful of any lesser radio operator who doesn't have a few thousand dollars invested in Ham radio equipment nor the licenses required to operate them.

Of course, they are totally objective when they cast aspersions on lesser equipment and their clueless operators.

Bumpyroad

Virginia

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Posted: 01/11/18 05:38am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Airstreamer67 wrote:

Quote: "If it helps someone from wasting their money, time and effort with a totally useless outmoded form of communications it was well worth my time and energy."

This sounds like a quote from a "Ham" who is disdainful of any lesser radio operator who doesn't have a few thousand dollars invested in Ham radio equipment nor the licenses required to operate them.

Of course, they are totally objective when they cast aspersions on lesser equipment and their clueless operators.


I was just getting ready to use the term "ham snob" and you saved me the trouble. and as far as the CB club using FERS? equipment for the folks doing the parking, makes sense to me. extremely short range needed, I would guess a lot of the members had either/or both a home setup or a car cb and didn't have a hand held.
bumpy

rbpru

North Central Indiana

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Posted: 01/11/18 09:21am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I am a ham operator and have been for 55 years. Yes there are "ham snob" who looked down their noses at CB. But these same folks view the newer no-code, amateur radio operators as appliances operators. They are old and they will pass. [emoticon]

To the OP's question, adding a CB depends on what you want and where you are.

As pointed out, the days of driving down the road chatting with other CBers are long gone. It was a fad popularized by a very active sun spot cycle and media mania.

For those of us who remember it, you could at times "work the world" or often several hundred miles, with little more than a 5 watt radio and 108" whip antenna.

Today with a magnetic mounted short antenna, a car to car range is about 3 miles or sometimes a bit more. They were handy when we would run a caravan on family trips. This of course has been replace by cell phones. Where there is cell service.

About the most useful function left, is monitoring the truckers for road information. A simple hand held can do that.

I cannot comment on city usage but it was not very useful the last time we listened but that was many years ago.

By the way, the Smokey warning really is not necessary when I am usually towing 10 mph under the speed limit.

* This post was edited 01/11/18 11:40am by rbpru *


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wnjj

Cornelius, Oregon

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Posted: 01/11/18 12:35pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

rbpru wrote:

Today with a magnetic mounted short antenna, a car to car range is about 3 miles or sometimes a bit more. They were handy when we would run a caravan on family trips. This of course has been replace by cell phones. Where there is cell service.

I don’t agree with cell phones replacing CB for the purpose of caravaning. Like you said, there’s the coverage issue but more than that, we travel with 3 to 5 vehicles. Conference talking is super easy on the CB and is immediate. I wouldn’t leave my phone connected in a call for a multi-hour trip.
If anything replaces CB for this purpose, it’s another radio like FRS/GMRS.

jaycocreek

Idaho

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Posted: 01/11/18 03:38pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

CB's are still very useful out west.On almost every logging job they post the CB channel to listen to,to avoid logging truck accidents.Very useful pulling a trailer, or even empty.

CB's are far from extinct in our mountainous regions out west, where there is no cell reception or other form of communication.


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mountainkowboy

Socal

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Posted: 01/11/18 04:24pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

We use CB's when on the trails with our off-road club for communication with the others on the run, and use Ham radio to keep in touch with base camp should any emergency arise. The CB is not dead, it's just used differently now than in the 70's.


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rbpru

North Central Indiana

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Posted: 01/11/18 05:10pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I agree if you are going to keep a round table going in a caravan, the cell phone is not very practical. We used ours as need to call the person of interest. The bigger problem was, as we got deeper into canoe country, cell towers were scarce.

As I mentioned a lot depends on what the OP wants or expects. It is interesting to note there are still pockets of CB activity.

Given the availability of old CB radios, it might be fun for the OP to play with for a while.

wnjj

Cornelius, Oregon

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Posted: 01/11/18 06:31pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

jaycocreek wrote:

CB's are still very useful out west.On almost every logging job they post the CB channel to listen to,to avoid logging truck accidents.Very useful pulling a trailer, or even empty.

CB's are far from extinct in our mountainous regions out west, where there is no cell reception or other form of communication.

Good point on the logging roads. Around the urban areas, the dump trucks all run channel 15. They also use it to communicate with the quarry just up the road from me and between trucks coming and going as they have a narrow driveway. I've picked up 10 tons of gravel without leaving the seat. The front loader at the pit has his on too.

Not that many years ago my dad radioed a nearby semi who had a really low tire. He was glad to get the info. Honking and waving might have worked but it was night and that could have caused more problems than it solved.

Passin Thru

N VA

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Posted: 01/11/18 07:25pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I have a CB, a Scanner and 2 Ham Radios. I'm ready.As stupid as people are I try to tell them if a Bear has someone pulled over. May save a life as some won't veer 2 inches to miss one. (My wife is one of the worst) Yesterday, on a 4lane in N Va, 2 guys were changing the bearing on a pickup 4 ft off the edge. Surprised they lived.

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