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 > Stargazing in Texas

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txnese

Pearland

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Posted: 05/28/18 08:41pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Looking for a good space to camp and see stars. I hear Big Bend National Park is great place, but it's about 8-9 hour drive for me. Hoping to find something no more than 4-5 hours outside of Houston, something about 50-100 east of Austin or San Antonio. Any suggestions? Thank you in advance.

NatParkJunkie

Pittsburgh

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Posted: 05/28/18 08:54pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I took this picture in Big Bend NPS last April at about 4 AM. I'm not from the area, but I'm sure there's lots of other dark places too. The stars at night, are big and bright, deep in the heart of Texas; from what I hear. [emoticon]
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b17drvr

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Posted: 05/28/18 09:59pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Kerrville is about a 4 hour drive from Houston. Pretty good viewing from there.

ppine

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Posted: 05/28/18 10:07pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Low humidity, elevation above sea level and remoteness all help stargazing. In central Texas you can have one of them. In West Texas you can have two of them. In Nevada or Utah you can have all three.

ronfisherman

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Posted: 05/29/18 02:40am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

While it is further than your request. The McDonald Observatory is a great place to view. We stayed at Davis Mountain State Park while visiting.


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ron.dittmer

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Posted: 05/29/18 03:13am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

While in Black Canyon Of The Gunnison National Park, we attended a night ranger talk about light polution. He said the park is one of a few public parks in the country where man-made light polution is at it's least. The stars out at night were tremendous.

Our zero gravity chairs come along on our trips primarily for star gazing.


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ronfisherman

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Posted: 05/29/18 03:41am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

ron.dittmer wrote:

While in Black Canyon Of The Gunnison National Park, we attended a night ranger talk about light polution. He said the park is one of a few public parks in the country where man-made light polution is at it's least. The stars out at night were tremendous.

Our zero gravity chairs come along on our trips primarily for star gazing.

We attended a similar ranger talk at Big Bend National Park.

DRTDEVL

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Posted: 05/29/18 07:19am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

ppine wrote:

Low humidity, elevation above sea level and remoteness all help stargazing. In central Texas you can have one of them. In West Texas you can have two of them. In Nevada or Utah you can have all three.


No, in West Texas you can have all three. Head out near Alpine and Marfa. Elevation 4,600, desert levels of humidity, and extremely remote, as its the northern edge of Big Bend Country. It knocks a couple hours off the trip to the BBNP, yet leaves the same level of stargazing.


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BB_TX

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Posted: 05/29/18 07:59am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I would go a little farther west than the Kerrville and Fredericksburg areas. We have hunted south of Fredericksburg for the last 49 years. It still gets pretty dark, and some nights with clear dry skies the milky way is very visible. But light pollution is creeping in. You can definitely see a "glow" coming from the east/southeast.

IDman

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Posted: 05/29/18 09:12am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

We were at Hord's Lake campground near Coleman, Tx. a couple of weeks ago and their was no light pollution. The stars were beautiful!

Also, the CG is really nice.

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