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ppine

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Posted: 05/29/18 09:16am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

DRTDEVL wrote:

ppine wrote:

Low humidity, elevation above sea level and remoteness all help stargazing. In central Texas you can have one of them. In West Texas you can have two of them. In Nevada or Utah you can have all three.


No, in West Texas you can have all three. Head out near Alpine and Marfa. Elevation 4,600, desert levels of humidity, and extremely remote, as its the northern edge of Big Bend Country. It knocks a couple hours off the trip to the BBNP, yet leaves the same level of stargazing.


My house is at 5,000 feet.
Have you ever seen the Milky Way at 12,000 feet?

* This post was edited 05/29/18 09:22am by ppine *

Bordercollie

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Posted: 05/29/18 11:07am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I was in my backyard in Orange County, CA a few years ago trying to spot the Andromeda Nebula with my "department store telescope" and finally spotted the small gray smudge. The same night I spotted a huge elongated black triangle, with tiny white lights along the edges, slowly floating over and gradually disappearing. I couldn't identify it, it was huge and at some altitude, and it was a black object against the night sky, I suppose it was a UFO. Hard to see anything in city light pollution.

wolfe10

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Posted: 05/29/18 03:27pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

ronfisherman wrote:

While it is further than your request. The McDonald Observatory is a great place to view. We stayed at Davis Mountain State Park while visiting.


Very good choice, one of our top choices. But again long way out there.

As already stated, you need BOTH: low humidity and secondarily elevation.


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fixn2gocamp

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Posted: 05/29/18 03:49pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Try Copper Breaks State park at Quanah Tx. It is a certified Dark Skies park.

BB_TX

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Posted: 05/29/18 08:46pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Here is some good info on TX star gazing.

DRTDEVL

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Posted: 05/30/18 06:52pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

ppine wrote:

DRTDEVL wrote:

ppine wrote:

Low humidity, elevation above sea level and remoteness all help stargazing. In central Texas you can have one of them. In West Texas you can have two of them. In Nevada or Utah you can have all three.


No, in West Texas you can have all three. Head out near Alpine and Marfa. Elevation 4,600, desert levels of humidity, and extremely remote, as its the northern edge of Big Bend Country. It knocks a couple hours off the trip to the BBNP, yet leaves the same level of stargazing.


My house is at 5,000 feet.
Have you ever seen the Milky Way at 12,000 feet?


I live at 4600' in southern NM, and I will be camping at 9200 feet starting tomorrow.

And yes, I have seen the milky way from extreme altitudes.


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rseymour21

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Posted: 06/03/18 12:13am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

wolfe10 wrote:

ronfisherman wrote:

While it is further than your request. The McDonald Observatory is a great place to view. We stayed at Davis Mountain State Park while visiting.


Very good choice, one of our top choices. But again long way out there.

As already stated, you need BOTH: low humidity and secondarily elevation.



I agree! Davis Mountain SP is one of the best in Texas. I do wish it were closer!


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Team Triton

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Posted: 06/05/18 05:59am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

We did Fort Davis during the dark of the moon in August a few years ago. Nothing like it. Drive the extra miles and do the star party at the observatory.

txnese

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Posted: 06/12/18 09:30pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Thanks for the input everyone. We’re leaning towards Fort Mckavett near Junction, TX. Not too many campgrounds to pick from though. I’m still a few weeks from going, so if y’all have any other suggestions, keep them coming. Thanks again.

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