Good Sam Club Open Roads Forum: Travel Trailers: Single axle TT's
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 > Single axle TT's

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Kavoom

Kansas

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Posted: 07/12/18 07:07am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

All I could afford wrote:

For those of us in the Northeast, a side benefit is the savings in Tolls on a single axle trailer. The nearest toll bridge to my house charges $21 PER AXLE INCLUDING THE TOW VEHICLE. $63 for a single axle becomes $84 for a tandem axle.
Heading south to the beach area is also bad. Toll booth every 20 miles or so on the Garden State Parkway $4.50 for single axle versus $6.00 for tandem... about six tollbooths between me and the beach I like.


Hadn't thought of tolls. None in MT and we get to go 80 on the highways and 70 on the backroads...when we don't have trailers hooked up.

tragusa3

upstate south carolina

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Posted: 07/12/18 07:53am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

You just ended any thoughts I had of an RV trip to the Northeast! I couldn't enjoy myself with those tolls.

I owned an Aspen Trail 15BH (single axle) for about 2-3 years. We used it heavily. I would not buy a budget level or single axle trailer again. I understand that for many, budget level is where we start (I did), but I felt the corners that were cut were DANGEROUS. We had several issues that a few dollars spent at the factory would have saved me thousands. For instance, I assumed the factory put grease in the bearings. They put the bare minimum and I had a failure with my family in the middle of the summer desert. Cost us $400 in repair and 3 days of our vacation...all for 10 cents of grease. I know, as the operator I should have checked myself. Now I know.

I now own a mid-tier product and recommend all that ask that they just start there.


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rbpru

North Central Indiana

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Posted: 07/12/18 08:51am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

It is the old story, redundancy adds a level of security, it also increases the cost and the number of things that can go wrong.

Personally I prefer dual axels because of the extra set of tires, and brakes. However, I am also willing to accept the increased cost and maintenance.

Obviously, some models do not offer a choice. so, to get the floor plan I wanted meant a dual axel TT.


Twenty six foot 2010 Dutchmen Lite pulled with a 2011 EcoBoost F-150 4x4.

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Kavoom

Kansas

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Posted: 07/14/18 07:53am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Aspen Trail Quality has varied over the years as one of the "bottom end" levels. I've been looking for at least six years and finally jumped when I found a floorplan that was perfect for us at substantially less than I was figuring. But, it was an Aspen Trail.

I remember looking at Aspen Trails like four and five years ago and I would NOT have bought one. The quality was really and easily noticeably bad including windows that hadn't been caulked. So, when we looked this year, I got down to the nitty gritty and was pleasantly surprised to see a lot of things addressed.

The first was the caulking. I commented on how bad quality of these had been in the past and the prep guy said it had gotten so bad at one point on Aspen Trails that dealers were going to quit ordering them including them.

I've seen them in the past where they looked like leaks ready to happen with window seals not caulked. Mine was very well done. In addition, I have an excellent dealership. They have two crews for repairs. One is the prep crew. The guy in charge is very good as are his people. When we went through after purchase I noticed the wall seams had all been redone. The crew guy said they just do that to all of them as a general rule because they are always bad. On the counter top, there was a little magic marker X from the factory in one place that he had missed and the factory had missed fixing before shipping.

First, we had to look closely to even see what the X was there for. So, we held a flashlight just right and could see a slight imperfection. I would have never noticed if I hadn't seen the X. So, they forgot to fix it or replace the counter top from the factory, but they did see it in the first place.

He apologized and indicated they would replace the counter top. To be honest, I could have lived with it, would have never noticed it without the X and even my significant other (eyes like a hawk) said she would have never noticed. So, I am lucky to have my dealer about six miles from home and to be known as a quality dealer. They even called here about a week ago, a couple of months after buying and asked how things were...

BarabooBob

Baraboo, WI

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Posted: 07/14/18 08:24am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

The number of axles has nothing to do with how easy it is to back a trailer. The factor that matters is the length of the trailer and the distance between the trailer axle and the hitch. I have a short utility trailer that is very difficult to back because the "turn time" is very short. I also have a trailer built to carry my 18' sea kayak that is extremely easy to back. Both of those trailers are single axle. The longer the trailer, the easier it is to plan your backup.
A single axle trailer will not tip over if you have a flat unless you are on a very sharply crowned road. The tire is only about 4" to 6" tall so the trailer does not tip very much. It is the same as driving up on 4 to 6 leveling blocks on a level road.


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profdant139

Southern California

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Posted: 07/14/18 11:23am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Baraboo Bob, I appreciate that reassurance about the trailer not tipping over -- it has been one of the things I worry about most. But I think you are right -- if the tire deflates or blows out, the trailer only dips as much as the height of the sidewall, which is not much.

Still a scary event, and one that I hope I will never witness first-hand. I frequently check tire tread and inflation.


2012 Fun Finder X-139 "Boondock Style" (axle-flipped and extra insulation)
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PAThwacker

East Stroudsburg, PA

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Posted: 08/19/18 06:36pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I prefer dual axles. Perfect sized trailer is 21ft with dual axles. I boondock with a single axle pup and carry 1,000 pounds of gear in my sub. I'd never own a single axle full height 7 or 8 foot wide travel trailer.


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Adam H

People's Republic of Kalifornia

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Posted: 08/21/18 03:15pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

All I could afford wrote:

For those of us in the Northeast, a side benefit is the savings in Tolls on a single axle trailer. The nearest toll bridge to my house charges $21 PER AXLE INCLUDING THE TOW VEHICLE. $63 for a single axle becomes $84 for a tandem axle.
Heading south to the beach area is also bad. Toll booth every 20 miles or so on the Garden State Parkway $4.50 for single axle versus $6.00 for tandem... about six tollbooths between me and the beach I like.


[email protected], and I thought California ripped people off with tolls. About $28.00 to cross the Golden Gate with a 2 axle trailer. Other bay area bridges slightly cheaper.

Adam


2007 Fleetwood Avalon HW PUP
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Gone but not Forgotten: 1971 Trailstar PUP, 2002 Fleetwood Wilderness Northwest Edition, 2002 Keystone Bobcat 280-EB

JCR-1

Crystal River, Florida

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Posted: 08/24/18 06:40am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Single axle saved me a lot of money in tolls. The whole Northeast is littered with tolls and expensive on two axles. I have had blow outs and never had any issues with the trailer tipping or getting squirrely. The only issue I had was the tire casing did chew up the well a bit but not a big deal to fix at least in my case.Not crazy that they equipped it with a 13 inch tire D range so I want to upgrade to a 14 inch 8 PR tire for extra safety.

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