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Crabbypatty

Long Island, New York

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Posted: 07/02/18 04:24am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I personally wouldn't spend the money in Lith Batts. Ive used Trojan T-125's now for 14 years. They also make larger batts specifically designed for deep cycles heavy industrial use. Yes they weigh more but they work great. I have 428 watts on my TT. We will be moving to a fiver soon and I will put 6-800 watts up top, but will increase to 4 batteries, or two with greater capacity and a MPPT controller.

Search RV net lots of solar info.

Happy Trails


John, Lisa & Tara">">">
2015 F250 4x4 Platinum, 6.2L 6 spd 3.73 gears, Reese 12klb w/dual cam, Prodigy, Sunny Brook Sunset Creek 298 BH, Trojan 125's, 448 watts Solar Morning Star 45, Honda EU3000, Dish TV, Xantrax Pure Sine 2000, Wilson Cellular Ant/Amp

Mako Kupo

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Posted: 07/03/18 05:23am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

2oldman wrote:

pianotuna wrote:

I don't see 800 watts of solar as massive.
I have 835w which I also do not consider massive. I consider it adequate.

Massive is when you cover your roof, hang them over the side and have a utility trailer full.


apologies, I only live in a 20 foot motorhome, so I thought 850w was pretty beastly especially combined with a huge lithium bank. I thought it'd be 800, but I was able to get 850 up there. I have my new panels on the way.

(second quote, can't figure out how to do two at once)I personally wouldn't spend the money in Lith Batts. Ive used Trojan T-125's now for 14 years. They also make larger batts specifically designed for deep cycles heavy industrial use. Yes they weigh more but they work great. I have 428 watts on my TT. We will be moving to a fiver soon and I will put 6-800 watts up top, but will increase to 4 batteries, or two with greater capacity and a MPPT controller.

the reason I don't want to go with agm, sealed, gel, or others are the lifespan. lithium costs more up front, but is cheaper in the long run and I am just getting started.

I went very basic with the install, all parallel panels. I still do not really know how panels in a series works, all I know is its hooked up differently and can provide higher voltage which is always nice. wouldn't it be significantly more expensive to do everything in 24v? also weight is a huge issue, I work online and keep what is ell int he camper with me. I on average am hauling an additional 2,000 pounds on top of the camper weight. I don't think it could handle the weight of 6 agm's on top of everything else, not to mention I don't have the room for them. lithium is really the only option.

thank you everyone so far!

Itinerant1

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Posted: 07/03/18 08:57am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Mako Kupo if you haven't been to airforums.com (airstream trailers) then the electrical sub forum there is alot of info/ threads there for Battleborn batteries.

Yes Lifepo4 cost more upfront but the benifits out weigh the dead lead.

Itinerant1

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Posted: 07/03/18 10:14am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Also if you haven't claimed the 30% tax credit claim it, $1800 off of $6000 doesn't hurt.

pianotuna

Regina, SK, Canada

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Posted: 07/03/18 10:50am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Itinerant1,

Any mention of Firefly batteries on the airforums? LI just won't do for me due to cold weather limitations.

I'm starting my 3rd summer with used telecom jars and so far they are holding up extremely well. Cost was below $1 per amp-hour, including tax. I push them hard--176 amps of load from the microwave.


Regards, Don
Full Time in a 28 foot Class C, 256 watts solar, 556 amp hours of AGM in two battery banks 12 volt batteries, 3000 watt Magnum hybrid inverter, Sola Basic Autoformer, Microair Easy Start.

pianotuna

Regina, SK, Canada

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Posted: 07/03/18 11:04am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Mako Kupo,

The only additional cost of using 24 or 48 volts is adding a dc (48 v) to dc (12 v) converter capable of running the minor 12 volt loads in an RV.

A few benefits are smaller wiring, an inverter that doesn't have to work so hard and no worries about balancing parallel batteries.

The disadvantages (it is always a trade off) are that each cell has to produce all the watts needed. That may cause them to exhibit greater voltage drop. If this is a problem at 48 volts, then going to 24 may be worth consideration.

However this is all moot as you now have invested in a 12 volt inverter capable of running your RV to your needs level.

I think LI jars are wonderful. It is just the cold that keeps me from them.

May I ask you to list the equipment you chose for the RV?

Itinerant1

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Posted: 07/03/18 11:07am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Pianotuna with all my surfing/ lurking I do on rv forums they haven't made a showing yet or at least that I've seen.
Only place that I've read is on the boat forums. Or bloggers with boats. They do look like a good trade off though when Lifepo4 won't cut the cold environment you have to deal with.

pianotuna

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Posted: 07/03/18 11:09am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

The advantage of panels in series is an earlier start to the charging day, a later end to charging day, and more likelihood of power generation when there are poor or cloudy conditions.

My system maxes out at 17 amps @ 12v output (nominal) and even in rain I get 4 amps at solar noon. My own system is series/parallel with a nominal input voltage of 33.

Mako Kupo

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Posted: 07/03/18 11:32am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

pianotuna wrote:

The advantage of panels in series is an earlier start to the charging day, a later end to charging day, and more likelihood of power generation when there are poor or cloudy conditions.

My system maxes out at 17 amps @ 12v output (nominal) and even in rain I get 4 amps at solar noon. My own system is series/parallel with a nominal input voltage of 33.


interesting. currently in heavy rain the max I've produced is 22w, didn't check the amps.

I knew a few of the 24v/48v benefits as in efficiency, thinner cables(id keep the same old fat cable why not) but thats about it.

so I have
1x renogy 12v 150w mono panel
1x mighty max 12v 150w mono panel
5x 100w renogy 12v mono panels
3x 50w 12v renogy mono panels

because of the odd numbers I can't do a perfect 24 or 48v setup with what I have correct? best case is leaving out 1x 100w, and 1x 50w panel. right? thanks!

* This post was edited 07/03/18 11:41am by Mako Kupo *

Mako Kupo

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Posted: 07/03/18 11:44am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

pianotuna wrote:

Mako Kupo,

The only additional cost of using 24 or 48 volts is adding a dc (48 v) to dc (12 v) converter capable of running the minor 12 volt loads in an RV.

A few benefits are smaller wiring, an inverter that doesn't have to work so hard and no worries about balancing parallel batteries.

The disadvantages (it is always a trade off) are that each cell has to produce all the watts needed. That may cause them to exhibit greater voltage drop. If this is a problem at 48 volts, then going to 24 may be worth consideration.

However this is all moot as you now have invested in a 12 volt inverter capable of running your RV to your needs level.

I think LI jars are wonderful. It is just the cold that keeps me from them.

May I ask you to list the equipment you chose for the RV?


I missed this, sorry. I have not yet purchased the 12v inverter, it is all just on a list. I have the budget, am just trying to put together the setup I need. I would love to build a good list on here. I posted the panels I have above, aside from that I have literally nothing. the panels are hooked up tot a yeti lithium 1400, providing power to everything in the rv.

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