Good Sam Club Open Roads Forum: Tow Vehicles: Can someone explain this?
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 > Can someone explain this?

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ShinerBock

SATX

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Posted: 07/06/18 08:33am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Well I guess that everyone checked out of the thread where I posted this because no one seemed to answer it and the thread died shortly there after(unless no one had an answer). So here is to hoping that a new thread will get new looks and maybe an explanation.

Can someone explain this? This F350 has a lower front GAWR, lower rear GAWR, and lower combined GAWR yet has a higher GVWR than my 2500. Kind of goes along with what I have been saying about some(not all) class 2B(250/2500) diesel trucks are de-rated due EPA and federal max GVWR numbers of their class rather than their actual carrying ability, but I would love to hear anyone else's explanation or guess.


2017 F350
Front GAWR: 5,600
Rear GAWR: 6,340
Combined GAWR: 11,940
GVWR: 11,500

[image]



My 2014 Ram 2500
Front GAWR: 6,000
Rear GAWR: 6,500
Combined GAWR: 12,500
GVWR: 10,000

[image]



I can see how this GM 3500 got its 11,500 GVWR rating even though it has a lower front GAWR then mine. The Ram 3500 SRW has just about the same rating, but with a 6,000 front GAWR and a 7,000 rear GAWR.

2018 GM 3500
Front GAWR: 5,600
Rear GAWR: 7,050
Combined GAWR: 12,650
GVWR: 11,500

[image]

parker.rowe

Delaware

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Posted: 07/06/18 08:44am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I believe the general idea is that the GVWR on 3/4 to 1 ton trucks is set by the manufacturer based on where they want it to fall in various classes.

All 2500's, IIRC, max out at 10K (some older ones may be lower). Puts them in s specific weight class even if all the equipment is the same as the respective 3500. In a lot of years, the only difference was that the 3500 version had extra rear overload springs.

This is not 100% always the case, but it explains why the totaled GAW doesn't equal the GVWR.

So basically, I guess I am agreeing with your take on it.

If I'm wrong, I'm sure someone will let us know! [emoticon]


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mkirsch

Rochester, NY

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Posted: 07/06/18 08:45am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

No great mystery to it. It's all about the "class" of the truck when it comes to licensing / registration.

10,000 is the limit for Class 2b. You'll never see a higher limit for a "3/4 ton" truck, ever. Manufacturers don't want to push the trucks into that higher-cost category for licensing and registration.


Putting 10-ply tires on half ton trucks since aught-four.

IdaD

Idaho

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Posted: 07/06/18 09:06am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I doubt all F350s are rated that low. Maybe the tires on that model are the limiting feature?


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ShinerBock

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Posted: 07/06/18 09:16am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

IdaD wrote:

I doubt all F350s are rated that low. Maybe the tires on that model are the limiting feature?


I had 20's on my truck new as well(as you can see on my sticker). And you are correct that not all F350's are rated this low, however, almost all of the F350's on the lots we visited had this same rating when I was helping my father in law order his new truck.

Although, this thread is more about how a truck with less all around GAWR can have a higher GVWR. Not trying to pick on pick on Ford here. It is just the only sticker example I have that has a lower all around GAWR but higher GVWR then my truck.

* This post was edited 07/06/18 09:37am by ShinerBock *

Old-Biscuit

Verde Valley

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Posted: 07/06/18 11:18am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Simply a matter of 'Classification'
MFGs set 'classification' for Registration Purposes

No mystery involved

[image]

* This post was edited 07/06/18 11:35am by Old-Biscuit *


Is it time for your medication or mine?


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ShinerBock

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Posted: 07/06/18 11:31am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Old-Biscuit wrote:

Simply a matter of 'Classification' ----No mystery involved



I know, and I agree with you as I stated in my original post. However, there seems to be some people that think otherwise like in the "3/4 Ton vs 1 Ton" and other threads that only look at the GVWR or the number on the side of the door of trucks and not all the specs. I was looking for an explanation from those people on how a truck with less GAWR can have a higher GVWR.

blt2ski

Kirkland, Wa

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Posted: 07/06/18 12:19pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Same question I had over my 81 C2500, but gcw 8500 lb, gvw 8600 lbs! ummmmmmmm so being as gcw is basically a performance standard, does that mean the truck should not be rated to the chassis ability?

Its probably more a how much, who is going to buy that truck per the manufactures people, so it is gvw'd per that end users useage. Sell something to me, I will push axel limits, ie most of us in construction or equal type commercial uses do push our rigs. Hence the lower gvw per total of gaw limits.

At the end of the day, I still feel a given rigs GVW should equal the sum of the GAW's. I can also see how the manufactures will artificially lower the GVW because of many HOA's wordings of no vehicles over 10,000 gvw or 1 ton trucks. Licensing per some states, not all are like here in Wa state where EVERYONE pays tonnage in a pickup, both commercial and personal use. Pretty cut and dry here on over/under 10,0000 lbs vehicles speed limits on freeways, etc. But based on the paid for registration, NOT the door sticker.

Marty


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nickthehunter

Southgate, MI

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Posted: 07/06/18 12:41pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Maybe it’s the brakes. A vehicle has to meet NHTSA requirements for braking ability tested at GVW. Not enough braking, lower The GVW until it does. There is no way to tell why the GVWR is what it is.

ShinerBock

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Posted: 07/06/18 12:48pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

nickthehunter wrote:

Maybe it’s the brakes. A vehicle has to meet NHTSA requirements for braking ability tested at GVW. Not enough braking, lower The GVW until it does.


The GAWR is the limit of the "axle system" which includes brakes, suspension, and axle so the 6,500 on my rear axle is due to the weakest link of those three components. I do know that the 11.5" rear axle alone on my 2500 is rated at 10,000 per the manufacturer, AAM.

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