Good Sam Club Open Roads Forum: Fifth-Wheels: horse or cart first?
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 > horse or cart first?

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fj12ryder

Platte City, MO

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Posted: 10/14/18 05:02pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

rhagfo wrote:

fj12ryder wrote:

"A two wheel drive truck in snow is useless."

Oh bosh. Of course they aren't useless, they don't get around as good as a 4WD obviously, but will do just fine in moderate snow. Some weight in the back and knowing how to drive in snow helps a lot, and a locking differential helps too.


There are two parts to driving in snow, go and control!
Yes, you can do a decent job of going with a 4X2, but for great control you really need 4X4. When the front wheels are driving and not plowing control is much better. That and most likely with a 4X2 you will likely loose traction in the most inconvenient place, like half way up a grade. With 4X2 you need to stop and chain up, with 4X4 just engage 4X4! I consider it cheap insurance.
I grew up in Iowa, and now live in Missouri. I've rarely found a need for 4WD, in all the many years of snow. We used to go out in our rear wheel drive cars and do some really stupid stuff and very rarely got stuck enough to need someone with a tractor to pull us out. 4WD vehicles were very much a rarity in the 50's and 60's but we actually got around pretty well in the winter.

If I lived somewhere that received a lot of snow, Utah, the mountains of Colorado, the northeast, etc. I would most likely spend the money for a 4WD vehicle, but someplace that only occasionally gets 6-8" of snow it's just a waste of money.


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4x4ord

Alberta

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Posted: 10/15/18 07:03am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

fj12ryder wrote:

"A two wheel drive truck in snow is useless."

Oh bosh. Of course they aren't useless, they don't get around as good as a 4WD obviously, but will do just fine in moderate snow. Some weight in the back and knowing how to drive in snow helps a lot, and a locking differential helps too.


A 2 wheel drive truck around here in the winter is actually worse than useless ... if you manage to get it out of your driveway it is hazard to other drivers.

As far as a locking differential goes I think it is almost useless as well. My truck has an electronic locking differential and I often try locking the diff when the truck can't move on account of two snowflakes on the ground. I've yet to find a time that locking the diff made enough difference that I didn't need to engage the front wheels.

Once the roads are plowed and salted, a two wheel drive truck can get around.

* This post was edited 10/15/18 07:10am by 4x4ord *


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Posted: 10/15/18 09:45am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

My W & P TT toyhauler was scaled at just over 6600 then with the golf cart and our stuff ended up 7,820. Our 2016 F250 10,000 GVW package with 3:73 and 6.2 had all it wanted. Had to lock out 6th gear on the flats and with a small head wind, had to lock out 5th. I would not buy another 6.2 without the lower gear ratio of 4:30.





Super_Dave

Harrisville, UT

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Posted: 10/15/18 10:16am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

fj12ryder wrote:



If I lived somewhere that received a lot of snow, Utah, the mountains of Colorado, the northeast, etc. I would most likely spend the money for a 4WD vehicle, but someplace that only occasionally gets 6-8" of snow it's just a waste of money.

I live in Utah and have never used 4 wheel drive in the snow. The roads are kept very clear here when it snows. The only time I use 4 wheel is at one lake we go to with a slick boat ramp when wet.

* This post was edited 10/19/18 12:59pm by an administrator/moderator *


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fj12ryder

Platte City, MO

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Posted: 10/15/18 11:04am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Super_Dave wrote:


I live in Utah and have never used 4 wheel drive in the snow. The roads are kept very clear here when it snows. The only time I use 4 wheel is at one lake we go to with a slick boat ramp when wet.

I meant to say Idaho, but stuck Utah in there by mistake. I figure Idaho gets more deep snow than Utah.

* This post was edited 10/19/18 01:00pm by an administrator/moderator *

Veebyes

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Posted: 10/17/18 09:52am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

What in the world would all these people do if they had to go back to manual 2wd vehicles of the 50s or even 60s? What would you do without power or electronic this that or the other to compensate for the inability to drive?

I started driving in 69 & did not get my first automatic till 06. Learned to drive a 1946 stick, cable clutch, cable brakes, no power steering, no syncromesh to get into 1st gear. It was a vehicle that had to be driven with 100% of the drivers attention. No time to fool with the radio, didn't have one, eat, drink or mess with the cellphone with a vehicle like that. Both hands & feet were busy.

I love my 2wd dually automatic with stuff in it I still have not figured out in 12 years but I do miss that clutch sometimes, especially in a slippery situation when I want to 'feel' what is happening between the wheels & the ground.


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miltvill

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Posted: 10/17/18 07:34pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

The gas truck can bee a good choice. The diesel engine is a lot heavier then the gas engine. The gas engine does not need DEF or have a DPF to cause problems. Any shop can work on the gas engine. If I was the OP I would get the truck first then match the 5th wheel. I like my 2wd diesel for my needs but will get a 4wd next time just because I have never had one before.


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rhagfo

Portland, OR

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Posted: 10/17/18 08:21pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

fj12ryder wrote:

I meant to say Idaho, but stuck Utah in there by mistake. I figure Idaho gets more deep snow than Utah.


Well I will say snow is not the only reason for a 4X4, there is mud, loose gravel, and sand to mention a few issues.
Have you ever been nose down hill on a gravel road and needed to back up around a slight turn?

* This post was edited 10/19/18 01:01pm by an administrator/moderator *


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rhagfo

Portland, OR

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Posted: 10/17/18 08:43pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I stand by my first post on page #2. Settle on your 5er first, you are looking at 32’ to 34’. In the 10,500# to 11,500# GVWR, our 32’ has a GVWR of 12,360#, I feel it is well built but still some light weight materials.
Find the 5er you really want, then let it decide what And how much TV you need. My DD now is the proud owner of a 2004 Ram 3500 CTD DRW for towing her 30’ four horse with living quarters GN trailer GVWR of just over 12,000#, but will be pin heavy. Yes a new Ram 3500 SRW can have 200# more GVWR, but she was not going to put out that much, this one only has 130K miles.

camperfamily

New Jersey

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Posted: 10/17/18 08:49pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I too suggest the 4.30 gearing. Traveled with a friend with a TT, under 8,000. He had a 6.2 F250 with the 3.73 gears. After a couple hours we agreed I'd follow him. He just wasn't able to keep up to me. Despite the heavier and high profile 5th our 6.7 diesel just plain outran him on every incline. Plus, he was really tired of the shifting after over 5k miles.

FWIW he has since traded and drives a '17 6.7 and after almost a year still has a huge smile.

Would I buy a 6.2 gasser – quite possibly, with the right gearing.


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