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Hedgehog

Fairhaven, Massachusetts

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Posted: 10/29/18 09:41am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I am looking to purchase a portable generator to power some of my home during a power outage. While I don’t lose power very often, storms are getting more unpredictable and I would rather be prepared. With that said, I looking at a Honda EM6500S and a Honda EU 7000. I know the 7000 is fuel injected and an inverter but is it worth an extra $1300 ? I literally have lost power approx. 48 total hours in 10 years. Any input would be appreciated.

LittleBill

Scranton, PA USA

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Posted: 10/29/18 09:44am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

you need to decide if you need 240v

you need to decide if you care about fuel economy

you need to decide if you care about noise level

you need to see if you have sensitive electronics that require cleaner THD.

only you can make that decision.





gbopp

The Keystone State

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Posted: 10/29/18 10:00am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

What will you be powering? That's a big generator. You can probably get away with something smaller. You don't need to run all your appliances at the same time.

Personally, I would spend the extra money and get the inverter generator.

donn0128

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Posted: 10/29/18 10:02am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

If you are really worried and have natural gas at the house a stationary generator would be the best. Remember, its not just the basic generator you need. You MUST have a transfer switch installed. Otherwise you run the risk of killing someone. Doing it right is not going to be cheap no matter how small the generator is you pick, so if your going to do it, do it right up front.


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Ski Pro 3

Placerville, CA

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Posted: 10/29/18 10:10am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I have the Honda EU7000, earlier version with carb. However, I outfitted it for propane from the get-go and have never run gasoline through it, just propane. I had a plumber run a line from my house propane to where the genny sits near the meter and panel. The purpose of this is so I never have to store gasoline in quantities that would make owning a genny for power outages practical. Gasoline gets old and stale. Especially this alcohol laced ****. Propane never goes bad. I tapped into the main panel and run the whole house off this generator. Since I heat with propane, in winter I could never max out the genny's capacity even if I tried. In summer I MIGHT be able to if I ran both house air conditioners (I have 2 AC's to split the house chilling in order to cut down on ducting and it's paid off)
Recently here in California, the electric company, PG&E, purposefully shut off power to homes in my area due to fire hazards. They were found to be responsible for several major fires here in California and now just shut down the grid when the fire danger is high and won't turn it back on again until the danger has passed AND they inspect every inch of overhead lines for any damage. This resulted in power off for 2 days. As the temps were mild, I didn't need AC, but the writing is on the wall; expect many more power outages in hot weather when fire danger is high. Our community lost a lot, considering all the stores, businesses and homes that had food needing to stay chilled. A few hours is one thing, a few days is gonna destroy a lot of food.

Spend all you want, but remember; if you do have extended outages, will the genny you buy last through the outage and save you from losing food or other stuff. We don't notice any difference when we have outages. All I have to do is watch for neighbor lights to return in order to know when to switch back to the grid.

Oh, the Honda is quiet. My neighbors never knew I had power or else I'm sure they would have asked to run extension cords to keep their fridges running. I'm not a jackass, I'd be happy to help them set up a genny if they wanted, but I'm also not going to risk my own need after doing all the work and spending all the money to do so either.


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LittleBill

Scranton, PA USA

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Posted: 10/29/18 10:12am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

donn0128 wrote:

If you are really worried and have natural gas at the house a stationary generator would be the best. Remember, its not just the basic generator you need. You MUST have a transfer switch installed. Otherwise you run the risk of killing someone. Doing it right is not going to be cheap no matter how small the generator is you pick, so if your going to do it, do it right up front.


so extension cords don't work with this generator? news to me.

will he prolly use the twist lock prolly, but to say he has to use a transfer switch is incorrect.

SidecarFlip

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Posted: 10/29/18 10:13am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I have a Generac (Honeywell) 17KW NG fired standby unit for the house (15 years old) and a diesel powered (John Deere) 25 KW standby for the farm.

I would never invest in a portable genny as backup power. Standby units are much more reliable, easier to maintain and cheaper.


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LittleBill

Scranton, PA USA

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Posted: 10/29/18 10:19am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

SidecarFlip wrote:

I have a Generac (Honeywell) 17KW NG fired standby unit for the house (15 years old) and a diesel powered (John Deere) 25 KW standby for the farm.

I would never invest in a portable genny as backup power. Standby units are much more reliable, easier to maintain and cheaper.


how in the world do you figure cheaper? i have seen quotes of 10k for a standby install.

i would also put up a honda against any consumer grade generac generator made period.

i have read multiple reports of generacs failing under 1k hours in standby use

each person needs to determine their needs, 1 solution doesn't fit all people

Artum Snowbird

Campbell River, B.C., Canada

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Posted: 10/29/18 10:31am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

We have had three power failures, 3.5 days, 2.5 days, and just over a day since we bought the Honda 2K. The house looked like an electrical spaghetti house, but on the third day we sat in bed with brewed coffee, watching the news from the storm on the TV, all powered by the Honda.


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Ski Pro 3

Placerville, CA

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Posted: 10/29/18 10:32am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

SidecarFlip wrote:

I have a Generac (Honeywell) 17KW NG fired standby unit for the house (15 years old) and a diesel powered (John Deere) 25 KW standby for the farm.

I would never invest in a portable genny as backup power. Standby units are much more reliable, easier to maintain and cheaper.


Do you actually use anywhere near the capacity of these generators? Does the noise they make matter at all?

I'd argue your Generac is not more reliable than a Honda inverter generator let alone MUCH more reliable.

How is a fixed generator easier to maintain than a portable generator? I can move my portable genny into my heated shop and work on it if ever needed. (In over 35 years living in the woods, I've never needed during an outage. Just do annual maintenance once a season)

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