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MEXICOWANDERER

las peñas, michoacan, mexico

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Posted: 11/04/18 11:08am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Interesting Navegator...

I use raw chapulines to catch pescado and the pescado makes up my tacos.

Dang it! You triggered my taco lust. Tacos al pastor. But no one up here in Borderlandia offers consome with tacos. Sigh, before you realize it Biscuits and Gravy might start appearing [emoticon]

May all wealthy gasolinera owners who cheat be sentenced to an eternal afterlife of...

[image]

* This post was edited 11/04/18 11:28am by MEXICOWANDERER *

MEXICOWANDERER

las peñas, michoacan, mexico

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Posted: 11/05/18 08:29pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Here is a cut and paste update from SEMPRA ENERGY who establishes needed tank farms at ports and terminals and who is a large importer (not the only one) of foreign refined fuel to the country.
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Sempra Energy’s subsidiary IEnova recently was awarded a 20-year contract by the Topolobampo Port Administration to build and operate an estimated $150 million receipt, storage and send-out liquid fuels marine terminal in the state of Sinaloa, Mexico.

The first phase of the new liquid fuels terminal will have a storage capacity of 1 million barrels of fuel, including gasoline and diesel. Operations are expected to start in the fourth quarter of 2020.

Topolobampo is the fifth liquid fuels terminal project to be announced by IEnova and continues to add to the company’s dominant position in this key market. IEnova also recently announced an expansion of its liquid fuels terminal in Veracruz and redistribution of capacity at terminals in Mexico City and Puebla, bringing IEnova’s expected terminal storage capacity to over 5 million barrels.

These marine storage terminals add to IEnova’s rapidly growing energy infrastructure portfolio and will provide a place for international refiners to store their products as Mexico works to build its inventories of gasoline and other refined products.


MEXICOWANDERER

las peñas, michoacan, mexico

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Posted: 11/06/18 09:17am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

EDIT I will try to find articles and post them as I come across them...

Sempra Energy has announced that its Mexican subsidiary, Infraestructura Energética Nova, S.A.B. de C.V. (IEnova), has signed a long-term contract with British Petroleum (BP) for the remaining 50% of the initial capacity of the proposed Baja Refinados liquid fuels marine terminal in Baja California, Mexico.

Under the agreement, BP will have storage capacity of 500 000 bbls of liquid fuels to supply its network of service stations in northern Mexico.

In addition, subject to the execution of certain agreements, BP will have the option to acquire up to 25% of the terminal's equity after commercial operations begin in 2H20.

In April, IEnova announced it signed a long-term contract with Chevron Combustibles de México S. de R.L. de C.V for approximately 50% of the facility's initial storage capacity, to supply Chevron service stations and other commercial and industrial consumers.

IEnova will be responsible for the development of the liquid fuels terminal project, including financing, obtaining permits, engineering, procurement and construction, as well as maintenance and operations.

The project will be located at the La Jovita Energy Hub in Ensenada and have an initial capacity of 1 million bbls of liquid fuels, with the potential for future expansion.
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Foreign fuel for Baja California Sur can only arrive at the Pichilingue tank farm via BARGE and the sole barge service transits the Mar de Perla from Topolobampo Sinaloa. A tanker would run aground. The tank farm is located several miles north of La Paz.

Ed White

Kelowna, BC, Canada

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Posted: 11/10/18 08:17am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

This information will probably drive the naysayers into another frenzy, but I'm pleased to announce that I have just driven a 2019 GMC Sierra Duramax pickup down the Baja from San Ysidro to Los Barriles (about an hour north of San Jose del Cabo), with NO sulfur-in-fuel related issues.

I had deliberately run my fuel tank to low before entering Mexico so that almost all of the fuel used was from Pemex stations on the Baja.

I utilized my GM test equipment to watch the emissions during the trip and for the first time ever there was NO indication of sulfur levels above 15 ppm.

This is yet one more piece of evidence that ULSD is now the norm on the entire Baja, consistent with information provided by Pemex, and consistent with the Mexican refinery upgrades confirmed by companies other than Pemex.

Talleyho69

Playa la Ropa, Zihuatanejo, Mexico

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Posted: 11/10/18 08:29am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Great news, thank you!

moisheh

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Posted: 11/10/18 08:49am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Just what are the indications of using non ulsd? Does the test equipment give you a sulfur reading?

Moisheh

MEXICOWANDERER

las peñas, michoacan, mexico

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Posted: 11/10/18 09:40pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Ed there is nothing preventing Topolobampo from getting diesel from Japan. A lot of Japan's diesel is sub 15 ppm. From Toplobampo diesel is barged across to Pichilingue. The Salina Cruz refinery is overtaxed as it is. Ernesto told me Pemex said it was running at 60% capacity and a lot of the diesel was committed to rural CFE generators. Old railroad locomotive engines with generators hung on the back. Salina Cruz refines a lot of number six fuel oil and pitch. Both used in large generator plants.

The same holds true for Guaymas. Salina Cruz is supposed to devote it's output to powering CFE generating plants up and down the Pacific Coast. Diesel fuel is secondary. As far as a guarantee of diesel fuel origin, good luck. Lazaro Cardenas and Acapulco are big diesel and gasoline eaters.

My hope is for Sempra Energy to get that Rosarito tank farm built fast. This is where premium gasoline is loaded into the tanker that brought up fuel oil from Salina Cruz for Tijuana's massive generator and sea water distillation plants. Baja's USA gasoline comes from the TESORO refinery in California. And this is where the premium gasoline for the entire west coast comes from.

Nothing would make me happier than ridding the country of low sulfur diesel and mediocre grade Magna gasoline. Some engines are satisfied with Magna. My Dodge bucks and stalls and forces me to either use Premium or spend a fortune on imported Chevron Techron additive. There is no excuse to sell Ubangi grade gasoline for four dollars a gallon.

My Kubota and my Cummins are perfectly happy with low sulfur diesel. I maintain scrupulously strict as hell measuring of kWh delivered versus fuel usage in my diesel generator. The consumption has not changed one whit in 18 years. As a reference, changing from #2 to ULSD is identical to have switched from number two to number one diesel. And you'd darned well better believe there is a 15% loss of economy.

As of a year and a half ago, my Dodge threw fits with Baja California Sur Magna gasoline. Exactly the same thing as happens at home in Michoacan. Up here in the northern state Magna is good, but throttle response is even better with BP fuel. Arco is not quite as good. [email protected]#$%&! car is like a 10 year old kid staring at a plate of brussel sprouts. My Chevrolet Pickup trucks were never that fussy. They did not like NOVA however.

When Sempra builds the Topolobampo tank farm, ULSD is assured for Baja Sur as is excellent gasoline. Pemex uses USA Premium gasoline without alcohol and without Tesoro's additive package. But it adds MTBE. The last tank full of Pemex premium I got reeked of it.

Mountaineer42

In the mountains

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Posted: 11/12/18 09:56am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Ed White wrote:

This information will probably drive the naysayers into another frenzy, but I'm pleased to announce that I have just driven a 2019 GMC Sierra Duramax pickup down the Baja from San Ysidro to Los Barriles (about an hour north of San Jose del Cabo), with NO sulfur-in-fuel related issues.

I had deliberately run my fuel tank to low before entering Mexico so that almost all of the fuel used was from Pemex stations on the Baja.

I utilized my GM test equipment to watch the emissions during the trip and for the first time ever there was NO indication of sulfur levels above 15 ppm.

This is yet one more piece of evidence that ULSD is now the norm on the entire Baja, consistent with information provided by Pemex, and consistent with the Mexican refinery upgrades confirmed by companies other than Pemex.


We're currently in Mazatlan, travelling with a 2013 Duramax and a 2017 Duramax. Absolutely no issues so far. Last year we had several post-2011 diesels in our park and there was not a single issue for any of them. Perhaps Mr Moishe's anonymous "petroleum industry executive" is a little off the mark.

MEXICOWANDERER

las peñas, michoacan, mexico

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Posted: 11/12/18 12:14pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I am trying my darndest to pass on information that states there are no guarantees.

Similarly it is Mr. White who attempts to convince others that forecasting problems by using low sulfur rather than ULSD has caused few if any problems according to his studies.

Pardon my skepticism. This is like arriving at at an equation with a few numbers and symbols missing.

In short it is long on assumption and missing verifiable data.

Mountaineer42 your entry states fact -- you have traveled to Mazatlan with no issues and have talked to similar folks who have had no issues.

But to extend that fact into conjecture leads into the wilderness of guessing. What Moishesh stated was ULSD was not being the norm on the mainland.

A person would have to stretch both facts and even then the buttons do not line up. It's as simple as that.

I wish Mr White would give forth Companies Other Than Pemex NAMES. I submitted the API and Moodys articles WHO UNDERWRITES LOANS TO PEMEX. Facts, links, proof. Couple that with Xavier and Ernesto's statements to me we have a problem with some of this information.

PEMEX is in trouble production wise and money wise. The revisions to the energy act last year is a testament to this

And ME, meaning, my body, walked the length of the Salamanca refinery and noted how silent the plant was. Vessels and heaters that normally clang and roar were barely whimpering. Columns that emit heat via uninsulated pipe flanges were not as hot as they should be. Two of six 600 pound pitch boilers were offline. For minutes there was no truck at the loading platform. My eyes do not lie. And my eyes do not think the new refinery upgrades were camouflaged from my eyes.

I ME MYSELF passed by the fence to the Salina Cruz refinacion a little over a year ago. There was 10 to 12 acres of freshly graded earth next to the Crude Unit but not a scrap of concrete forms. You do not build a refinery on dirt. You build it on 24" of poured six sack cement and then let it cure for a year before erecting one damned vessel. I returned to read official PEMEX utter poppycock about the change in plans to produce ULSD to Premium ULSG gasoline. Do I look like a fool? The people I was riding with got upset at the three hours the diversion took.

The bottom line is this and you can take it to the bank...

With PEMEX purchasing tankerloads of diesel from US and Japanese refineries it's anyone's guess what the franchises are pumping into people's tanks.

It's pure common sense to think that the west coast refinery is concentrating on supplying number six fuel oil to power electrical plants. The further the diesel travels from the source, the more likely it is that foreign diesel may be mixed in. With a pair of 10 x 50 field glasses I confirmed the tanker Nandeska Maru was tied to the Rosarito off shore terminal a few months ago. A huge vessel. Why was a Japanese tanker moored there? To supply ULSD. Wait! Being an ex refinery employee I know for a fact not conjecture that Autumn is the time frame for annual refinery turnarounds. They do it like a chain in the Bay Area, Chevron, Exxon, Shell, then Tesoro.

So hold your horses with assumptions and pronouncements please [emoticon]

Foreign energy companies are marching into Mexico like an invasion. Establishing proprietary tank farms at ports. They are going to pump or carry their own brand to distribute it. Mexico it is assumed will allow enough foreign gasoline to ease the burden on the refineries. With ULSD there is no choice there is a mandate. With city areas under siege from smog regular gasoline must be ultra low sulfur. That is also part of a federal mandate.

We need more testaments like Mountaineer42 that says RVs have traveled through an area with no problems and a lot less hyperbole about the country having all ULSD.

It's all about worry free tourism.

moisheh

North America

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Posted: 11/12/18 02:29pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Very few pickups have had problems. But we do not hear from this with motorhomes. Mr White even c!aimed that there must be ulsd in Kino as he had no reports from this area.Whst he did not report is that there are very few diesel pu trucks in this area. Maybe less than 10. He took a short trip in a public and claimed he had some device that told him there were no problems. But what was that device. Even most state emission sites do not have that equipment. I have never seen anything from him that verified his findings. However he will be correct early next year when all the stations will have the fuel. If ulsd was everywhere the transport companies would be buying trucks with 2010 emission sytems. That has not happened. I have checked at least 8 large Pemex stations that sell to Truckers. None have any signs out front or on the pumps that the fuel is UlSD. Only that the Cetane is 45. Heck even Magna is not low Sulfur. I did not mention the name of the contact or the oil company as he requested not to make that info public. But if mountaineer sends me a pm I will forward some info.


Moisheh

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