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 > What temperature do you leave your home at

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Geeze

Iowa

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Posted: 10/19/19 11:45am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

We have a Simplisafe security system. I have one of those large round outdoor thermometers in the house where one of my security cameras can see it. I can remote in and check the tempreture in the house.

Whiskey River

Pittsburgh, Pa

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Posted: 10/20/19 06:29am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Interesting topic...
Every temperature from 45 to 65 and some even turn off the furnace.
I am with sidecar and use 45. And spend 4 months in Florida in winter.
I also know nothing about heat exchangers or evaporating moisture and virtually nothing about furnaces.
My thought is regardless of what temp the furnace is set at, ie 45, 55, or 65 once the house has reached that temperature and the outside ambient temp is say 25 degrees the furnace will run the same amount of time to raise the temperature 1 degree. So if the temp is set at 45, the thermostat drops to 44 & the furnace comes on and raises the temp to 45 & shuts off. Same with 55. Drops to 54 and furnace comes on and raises the temp to 55 and shuts off.
This may be totally wrong, just my thought. I know various air humidity, and wind may affect this somewhat, but I'm at 45 degrees and have been so for the last 5 years. And my furnace is 7/8 years old and has the flue pipe & cold air pick up out the side of the house. Old furnace ran up chimney to the roof.
Just my thought. If I'm wrong, say so.....and why...

magicbus

Nantucket Island, MA

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Posted: 10/20/19 07:56am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I don't think you are wrong because it obviously works for you. We have a propane furnace that we leave on 62 and part of that is because I don't have to give a second thought to pipes that may be subject to an outside draft and I don't know about it. With 5 years of using a setting of 45 I would have he same confidence you do.

We had central air recently installed and I had them install a heat pump inverter a) because they are much quieter; and b) we now have backup heat. The heat pump won't even allow you to go below 60, which works out fine for us.

Dave


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joebedford

Sheltering at home

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Posted: 10/20/19 09:08am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

You're probably right about the length of run to raise the temperature one degree. However, it won't do it as often. Otherwise, what's the point of lowering the set temp at all?

moisheh

North America

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Posted: 10/20/19 09:03pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Deoending on where you live setting the temp at under 50 might cause structure problems. If the stat is at say 45 portions of the house will be much less. We keep ours at 60. Our outside temps can often be close minus 40

almcc

Ontario, Canada

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Posted: 10/21/19 06:06am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

After reading the link above from the contractors it brings up some additional thoughts and comments about the condensation that's causing the heat exchanger damage.

I assume that the condensation occurs on the warm air side of the exchanger, if so whether your furnace gets damaged may depend on the climate conditions where you live. Here in the cold dry north the inside humidity level is so low in the house during the winter that the wood cabinets shrink due to moisture loss. I don't think that running the house temp lower than 60F will damage our furnace. Maybe a heating contractor/tekkie can comment.





BarneyS

S.E. Lower Michigan

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Posted: 10/22/19 05:17pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I always set ours at 56 degrees. I figured that at that temp the furnace would come on enough to keep the humidity where it should be but not come on enough to break the bank. Worked fine for all the 19 years that we snowbirded.
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Whiskey River

Pittsburgh, Pa

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Posted: 10/23/19 06:23am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Jumping back in...
After 46 posts it appears you should set the thermostat at your sticks & bricks at what you want.
I do 45 as does sidecar & turn off the water & open cabinet doors.
Some have said low temps may cause structural damage. Not sure what that would be as all outside walls & root trusses including the bottom cord (ceiling) are all at outside ambient temp or very close to it, no heat there.
I heard years ago that plastered walls should not be left in the cold for any length of time. Don't know if that's true or not. With the introduction of dry wall 50 or 60 years ago, plastered walls have mostly gone with the dodo bird.
My thought is the interior heat is for the comfort of the occupants of the house. The couch just sits there & doesn't care if its 45 or 55 degree's. The carpet just lays there & does not care if its 55 or 65 degree's.
And I don't know what some folks pay for electric or gas, but in a Pittsburgh winter its a lot more than penny's between 45 degrees & 65 degrees. I'm not against using my share of the "carbon footprint" either, when I'm home in winter, its 70 degrees...…….

bucky

Raleigh metro

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Posted: 01/05/20 09:52am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Without a automatic propane whole house generator with a huge tank all of the above except the Minnesota crowd are just sharing ideas. Most will have family or friends nearby that can check but they will be helpless in an extended outage.
Ice storms can be brutal on the electric grid.


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DustyR

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Posted: 01/06/20 06:07am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

The four years I spent south I always set the thermostat at 60*, because of wanting good heat on the pluming. The most concern is in the case of severe weather, you need a friend or electronic device to be sure the heating system is functioning.


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