Good Sam Club Open Roads Forum: Another question about Banff to Jasper
Open Roads Forum Already a member? Login here.   If not, Register Today!  |  Help

Newest  |  Active  |  Popular  |  RVing FAQ Forum Rules  |  Forum Posting Help and Support  |  Contact  

Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in RVing in Canada and Alaska

Open Roads Forum  >  RVing in Canada and Alaska  >  Canada

 > Another question about Banff to Jasper

Reply to Topic  |  Subscribe  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 3  
Prev  |  Next
profdant139

Southern California

Senior Member

Joined: 11/14/2005

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 01/04/19 08:21pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

fran, a couple of thoughts -- do you have solar? or portable solar? That can extend the time that you can dry camp, by quite a lot. Even more if you use the furnace very sparingly and just dress very warmly. (I forget what time of year you are going.)

With a 30 foot rig, you may be limited to the Icefields parking lot, which is not lovely. But it is very well located. And I think Yoho can take a big rig -- they have a big open sunny meadow with big campsites. Check it out on Google Earth.

My second question -- how far do you ordinarily hike each day? If you can do 8 miles with 2000 feet of elevation gain, there is so much to do -- you just can't go wrong. The Iceline trail in Yoho, the Wilcox area near the Icefields, the Plain of the Six Glaciers at Lake Louise, even Peter Lougheed Provincial Park. World class hiking, everywhere you look.

Better yet, the hikes are not really at high elevation -- you sometimes get up to 7000 feet, but this is not Colorado, where the trailheads are at 10,000 feet. So there is more oxygen than we normally encounter on a mountain hike, which made hiking in Canada a lot easier than in the Sierras, for example.


2012 Fun Finder X-139 "Boondock Style" (axle-flipped and extra insulation)
2013 Toyota Tacoma Off-Road (semi-beefy tires and components)
Our trips -- pix and text
About our trailer
"A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single list."


profdant139

Southern California

Senior Member

Joined: 11/14/2005

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 01/04/19 09:30pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

By the way, check out the similarities between this shot and crosscheck's, above -- very funny. Almost the same place, similar lighting, rugged and athletic DW standing on the edge of the cliff, short hair flying in the wind. I could be accused of copying him, except that my shot was taken in 2012:

[image]
[image]Click For Full-Size Image.

crosscheck

Coldstream, BC

Senior Member

Joined: 12/14/2010

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 01/04/19 10:10pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Acouple of differences between the 2 photos.#1) Dan is a much better photographer than I am.#2)We are in a similar area of the ridge going up to the peak, but we are a little higher up and The views get much better as you climb.

So the hikes are easier in Canada than the Sierra's? Well,I have a bottle of single malt that says, if you can survive more than 1 day on some of these wilderness hikes I have in mind in BC,not some fancy well designed,12% NP trails,I will eat crow.
When do you want to start? Make sure your insurance is up to date and bring a good pack.

Dave


2016 F350 Diesel 4X4 CC SRW SB,
2016 Creekside 23RKS, 490W solar, 2000W Xantrex Freedom 2012 inverter, 4 6V GC-2 (450AH)
2006 F350 CC 4X4 sold
2011 Outfitter 9.5' sold
Some Of Our Fun:http://daveincoldstream.blogspot.ca/

obgraham

TriCites WA

Senior Member

Joined: 08/30/2005

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 01/04/19 10:57pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Interesting how people differ. We've been going to Banff/Jasper for over 40 years. There's no comparison in my mind -- Jasper is much more interesting for us. Banff itself is a crowded little town where we find very little to do. A day there suits us. Lake Louise is lovely, but really really crowded now. The Icefields and Jasper we easily spend 7-10 days at.

All the area has gotten a lot busier, and the wildlife is a lot scarcer now than it was -- except for the Elk in Whistlers and Wapiti CG's.

profdant139

Southern California

Senior Member

Joined: 11/14/2005

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 01/05/19 03:45am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Dave, I follow your blog -- so I know for a fact that there is no way in heaven I would try to keep up with you and Pat!! A nice 12 percent grade suits me just fine. I'm just saying that all other things being equal (same distance, same grade), the hiking in Canada was more pleasant than in the Sierras or Colorado because there was more air to breathe at lower elevations.

As a result, we could cover more ground, with more time to take pictures. We have done a lot of day hiking over the last 15 years, and I would have to say that the whole Banff/Jasper area is at the top of our "all-time greatest" list.

Kevinwa

Western canada

Full Member

Joined: 05/03/2014

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 01/05/19 08:35am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Personally I would choose to spend more days in jasper then Banff. This is partly due to being more familiar with it, and I don’t like huge crowds. That may change as my kids start getting to the age where we can do whole day hikes and not just the tourist trap sites. The parks Canada website will have decently detailed descriptions for hikes in the “things to do” tab when you are either on the Banff or jasper page.
I totally recommend reservations on weekends, but if there on a week day, especially if in June there are lots of more remote non reservation sites in smaller campgrounds. They are no services but usually come with a great view.
If stopping in Radium at all we love Canyon RV resort,
Tunnel mountain campgrounds in Banff are very parking lot like, you parrelel park on a paved road, but if you are planning on spending your entire time out and about sometimes it is nice to have a centrally located base camp with more services. If you get some of the sites along the south edge the view is amazing, you can find the ones with the good view when reserving. There full hookup sites do not have fire pits.

crosscheck

Coldstream, BC

Senior Member

Joined: 12/14/2010

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 01/05/19 10:08am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

profdant139 wrote:

Dave, I follow your blog -- so I know for a fact that there is no way in heaven I would try to keep up with you and Pat!! A nice 12 percent grade suits me just fine. I'm just saying that all other things being equal (same distance, same grade), the hiking in Canada was more pleasant than in the Sierras or Colorado because there was more air to breathe at lower elevations.

As a result, we could cover more ground, with more time to take pictures. We have done a lot of day hiking over the last 15 years, and I would have to say that the whole Banff/Jasper area is at the top of our "all-time greatest" list.


Dan
I still really appreciate following your trips and the inspiring photos that accommpany your blog. Keep your boots moving

Dave

Floridafrances

Pensacola Beach

Senior Member

Joined: 08/16/2010

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 01/05/19 06:22pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Thank you all for the additional replies.

profdant, unfortunately we do not have solar. Before our trip to Rocky Mountain National Park in Fall 2017, we added 2 more Trojan 6 volt batteries to the 2 we already had. The 4 nights we were at RMNP, we never drew either set down below 50%, even on the mornings when the first one up (I did my best to make sure that was Tom) was assigned to turn on the furnace to knock the chill down enough for us to leave our snug, warm beds and hastily dress.

As for hiking, from reading your blog posts, I think we're much like you on the types of hikes regarding length and gains. And I totally understand your comment about the lack of oxygen on Colorado hikes. My Florida yard is at 6 feet above sea level. I sometimes felt like I was trying to breathe with a plastic bag over my head. But we did those hikes and survived.

obgraham and Kevinwa, we live on a tourist destination barrier island so we try to get away from crowded places when we travel. Especially for the hiking part. As you noted Kevin, on a trip like this we're the type who are gone all day so campground amenities, such as how spacious it is, don't matter as much to us as convenient location does. Now if I can find a place with a convenient location and great scenery, I love it. But often not possible. Considering how popular that whole area is, and with some campgrounds being closed this year, I'll probably be thankful to get whatever I can. Where ever I can.

I've moved all this new info into my word doc. Now I'm off to read more about some of these hikes and try to get better oriented to what's where.

* This post was edited 01/05/19 08:07pm by Floridafrances *


Frances & Tom with 3 rescue cats - Peaches, Snippet,and BP. And in spirit Aja (Dec 2014) and Tipper (Oct 2016).
2011 Winnebago Vista 30W
2008 4 door Hardtop Wrangler Unlimited 4X4

profdant139

Southern California

Senior Member

Joined: 11/14/2005

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 01/06/19 09:24am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Frances, I would strongly suggest a portable solar panel. We have a 120 watt panel -- it is easy to deploy, and it greatly extends our ability to dry camp. The advantage is that you can put it in the sun, even if your RV is in partial shade.

And since you are a moderate hiker (like we are, not experts like Dave and Pat!!), I would recommend the Larch Valley/Sentinel Pass area near Lake Louise, in addition to the other trails mentioned above.

Here is a possible strategy -- stay for a few days at Lake Louise. Yes, it is noisy due to the trains. Bring earplugs. But it is very well located -- lots of great hikes. And then shift for a few days to Yoho -- not that far away, more great hiking. And a few days at the Icefields.

All three of those locations are big-rig friendly.

We have been to this area twice, and we stayed in Banff for a couple of nights for shopping and laundry and so forth. But we were not as impressed with the hiking in the immediate Banff area.

Harvey51

Alberta

Senior Member

Joined: 12/11/2006

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 01/07/19 06:20pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

The last couple of times we stopped at the Icefields parking and tourist info, it was full of vehicles and people. Tours to the glass bottom lookout begin there as well as glacier tours. Same for Miette Hot Springs.

There are some great hikes near Saskatchewan Crossing with no crowds. Campsites east of the crossing on highway 11 are usually not crowded in our experience.

* This post was edited 01/07/19 06:26pm by Harvey51 *


2004 E350 Adventurer (Canadian) 20 footer - Alberta, Canada
No TV + 100W solar = no generator needed

Reply to Topic  |  Subscribe  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 3  
Prev  |  Next

Open Roads Forum  >  RVing in Canada and Alaska  >  Canada

 > Another question about Banff to Jasper
Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in RVing in Canada and Alaska


New posts No new posts
Closed, new posts Closed, no new posts
Moved, new posts Moved, no new posts

Adjust text size:

© 2019 CWI, Inc. © 2019 Good Sam Enterprises, LLC. All Rights Reserved. | Terms of Use | PRIVACY POLICY | YOUR PRIVACY RIGHTS