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agesilaus

North Florida

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Posted: 02/18/19 11:31am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Yeah well the physics are:

P1V1/T1 = P2V2/T2 where P=pressure, V=Volume and T-Temp in degrees Kelvin

Since V1=V2 you can drop that from the equation (yes volume may change slightly but we can ignore that)
and P2 is twice P1 then the temp in degrees K would have to double. Like from 270 deg K to 540 deg K and that obviously is not happening. That would be a 270 deg Celsius temp jump since our tires are not running at over 500 deg F. That's what physics says.


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TakingThe5th

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Posted: 02/18/19 01:38pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

bob213 wrote:

My TST 507 is great. It does not include the psychic ability feature that can predict a blow out. If you have tread separation and the tire does not deflate it can not tell you that either. A rapid loss of air pressure or high heat, it reports well.

When we came home and parked we discovered that we had a problem. Tires looked absolutely fine, no pressure loss. But neither of the X-chocks would fit on one side which was very strange since they were pre-adjusted and interchangeable. I looked everywhere for a problem but could not find anything. Took it to a frame shop and they replaced some spring bushings but knew they hadn't found the problem until they measured the diameter of the tires. Two tires on the street side were larger in diameter then the other two on the curb side. But the tires looked fine to them too. I took the rig to my favorite tire shop and the problem became obvious only when the tires were dismounted. Iit took no special skills or tools to see that two of the four tires had lost their integrity. Those tires probably hit something, got damaged, and were ready to blow. Lucky me! And I'm careful with my tires - don't roll over curbs or cut corners and I try to avoid potholes.

So how can I realistically expect a TPMS system to detect something that myself and several experts cannot readily detect. No, I don't have a TPMS system, not yet anyway, but it sounds like a good tool to have onboard. Although tire pressure was never an issue, It might have discovered some excess heat being generated.


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BB_TX

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Posted: 02/18/19 02:02pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

ajriding wrote:

With campers, towing, truck camper or any high payload weight you will also need to keep an eye out for pressure going UP.

In the desert on hot pavement your tire pressure can double easily. Tires are usually fine up to double the max pressure stamped on the side just to cover any defective tires.
...............

I have driven at 65-70 mph for hours at a time in temps as high as 108 and have never seen my 80 psi tires pressure rise more than 10% or so. So hot that my tires stuck to the hot soft asphalt at a rest area and I had difficulty getting them unstuck to start rolling again. [emoticon]

fj12ryder

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Posted: 02/18/19 02:25pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

BB_TX wrote:

ajriding wrote:

With campers, towing, truck camper or any high payload weight you will also need to keep an eye out for pressure going UP.

In the desert on hot pavement your tire pressure can double easily. Tires are usually fine up to double the max pressure stamped on the side just to cover any defective tires.
...............

I have driven at 65-70 mph for hours at a time in temps as high as 108 and have never seen my 80 psi tires pressure rise more than 10% or so. So hot that my tires stuck to the hot soft asphalt at a rest area and I had difficulty getting them unstuck to start rolling again. [emoticon]
Well, I've seen more than 10% rise, maybe 15-18%, but nothing anywhere near 100%. I mean 130 psi with a 65 psi tire? 220 psi with a 110 psi rated tire? Seems pretty unlikely.


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Ralph Cramden

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Posted: 02/18/19 02:29pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

fj12ryder wrote:

BB_TX wrote:

ajriding wrote:

With campers, towing, truck camper or any high payload weight you will also need to keep an eye out for pressure going UP.

In the desert on hot pavement your tire pressure can double easily. Tires are usually fine up to double the max pressure stamped on the side just to cover any defective tires.
...............

I have driven at 65-70 mph for hours at a time in temps as high as 108 and have never seen my 80 psi tires pressure rise more than 10% or so. So hot that my tires stuck to the hot soft asphalt at a rest area and I had difficulty getting them unstuck to start rolling again. [emoticon]
Well, I've seen more than 10% rise, maybe 15-18%, but nothing anywhere near 100%. I mean 130 psi with a 65 psi tire? 220 psi with a 110 psi rated tire? Seems pretty unlikely.


If you twist up and smoke enough Scooby Snacks while driving across the desert, the chances are fair to midland the internal pressure in your cranium can double also.

myowneq

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Posted: 02/18/19 03:45pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I've owned a TST system for a few years now. I take 3-5 trips a year, usually less than 3 hours one way. My trailer is 31 feet, truck + trailer is 49 feet. I have no issues with distance.

I like having mine. I have the four sensors on the trailer, and two on the rear axle of my truck. The display cycles each tire sequentially about every five seconds I guess. While the system cycles the display, it is constantly monitoring all sensors. If there is a problem (high /low pressure, high temp), it will jump to that sensor immediately and sound the alarm. I can't remember for sure, but I believe the owners manual for the TST says this. Im not near my book so I can't confirm this at this time.

It doesn't take but a second to look at a pressure and temp, then back to the road. You don't sit there and watch it. Many of us spend longer than that figuring out which lane you need to be in for that interstate split. If you want to watch it 24/7, have your passenger monitor.

I have had three tire failures while using the TPM. I can say now I know the problem is I was sold tires that are not rated for my weight. When brand new, they were fine. After a few years, not so much. Two times, I was warned of decreasing pressure and able to get off the road before the tire or camper were damaged. Now the blowout, no warning but that alarm went off and alerted to 0 pressure and a quick check in the mirror told me I was in some deep doo doo. While there was some damage to the camper, it was mostly cosmetic.

Thats my experience. Hope it help you decide.


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TakingThe5th

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Posted: 02/18/19 04:06pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

So if we are in favor of a TPMS, what are the best ones to look at? Looking at this thread I see the TST 507 being shown as the frontrunner. Any others? And what type of wheel sensor works best?

bob213

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Posted: 02/18/19 05:41pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I think any of the top 3 (TST, TireMinder, TireTracker,+ One I can't recall) will do what you want and all in the same price range. TST has great customer service.
I started with flo thru but have switch to regular monitors and removed the anti theft cover. New flow thrus are smaller, so may be better.


You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality – Ayn Rand


Dutch_12078

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Posted: 02/18/19 05:46pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I've used TST TPMS's for the past 10 years, a 510 system for the first 6 years, and a 507 system for the past 4. Over the years, I've been alerted to a failing wheel bearing and a sticking caliper on our toad, and a sticking caliper on our coach, as well as a few slow tire leaks. We did have one blowout on our previous toad caused by a piece of steel road debris. The wheel sensor alerted almost instantly...


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myowneq

Louisiana

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Posted: 02/19/19 05:49am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

The sensors I have are the ones mounted outside on the valve stem. I prefer that because if battery needs changed, I need a small screwdriver, not a tire shop. They are ok to mount on plastic valve stems, but I've had metal ones in my trailer just for s&g.

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