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Procrastinator

Southern Illinois

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Posted: 02/25/19 03:01pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I have had 3 super duty platform vehicles. A v10 excursion, a 7.3 excursion, and a 05 dually. The dually could not make it three months in the winter without a sticking pad. New quality rotors, calibers, greased slide pins, new fluid, and new pads I just got used to exiting the truck and sniffing for that familiar smell. Then I would go home and unstick them again. It got old real quick. Never seemed to occur in the summer. Right or wrong I blamed the salt on the roads.


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BenK

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Posted: 02/25/19 04:39pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Another thing to check...the flex hoses to the caliper

Check if they have age cracks or anykind of nick/crack that might allow road salts to get to the spiral steel wire that keeps the hose from expanding

IIRC, rust has about 2 times the volume as steel, so it will pinch off the hose and NOT release all of the hydraulic pressure after you release the brake pedal.

That will leave enough PSI to keep the pads pushed up against the rotor


-Ben Picture of my rig
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Lynnmor

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Posted: 02/25/19 05:45pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

BenK wrote:

Another thing to check...the flex hoses to the caliper

Check if they have age cracks or anykind of nick/crack that might allow road salts to get to the spiral steel wire that keeps the hose from expanding

IIRC, rust has about 2 times the volume as steel, so it will pinch off the hose and NOT release all of the hydraulic pressure after you release the brake pedal.

That will leave enough PSI to keep the pads pushed up against the rotor


I've seen that happen. Some hoses go thru a steel bracket that rusts and pinches the hose. I noticed that the OP said in his original post that he replaced hoses, so I didn't mention that.

Some motorhomes had a rash of problems with phenolic caliper pistons that absorbed moisture and swelled. I don't know if this is what the OP has on his Ford.





agesilaus

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Posted: 02/25/19 06:48pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I see that you can just replace the piston itself, might be worth ordering some cast iron pistons and avoiding the big shipping charge.

I see Autozone is supposed to be carrying Raybestos brakes so that would fix the core problem.

* This post was edited 02/25/19 08:15pm by agesilaus *


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Procrastinator

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Posted: 02/26/19 06:14am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

groundhogy wrote:

Hi,

So I am again smelling burnt brake smell on my 2003 7.3L F-250.

In the last few years, every one of those brakes has been replaced.
Rebuilt calipers, hoses, and pads.

Now Im smelling the back starboard side rear again. The wheel is warm to the touch after driving. This will be the third time for this unit in the last 3-4 years.

Any ideas on why this is happening or what I might be doing wrong?

groundhogy



Sorry, I just wanted to post up praise for your description "starboard" side rear.

I did a couple of enlistments in the Navy both on a ship and later on land in the Seabees. In the middle of the country, you don't hear people use port and starboard often.

TakingThe5th

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Posted: 02/26/19 09:16am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Grit dog wrote:


And if a person, especially living in the salt belt, does not adequate lube the slides, that is the second most likely cause IMO.

No "light grease rubs" into the pores of the steel. First, it sounds dirty or you're having too much fun rubbing your pins...
Anti seize that stuff and be done with it.

Glad you enjoyed my "grease rub" comment. What I meant to say
was I used the smallest amount of "grease" to moisten the metal without the danger of getting it on the pads or rotor. To do that I have used my bottle of brake caliper lube, or those little packets that they sometimes throw in, or anti-seize - I've tried them all.

I've considered the salt issue. I clean my brakes every year, only because of this problem, and I see no salt-related issues. I've heard some people talk about concern over the "beet juice" that they spread on the roads here - some say it is more corrosive then salt but, again, I'm not seeing it in my brakes and my truck is still almost rust-free. And my other vehicles are having no problems like this.

I too have been exercising the ABS system as well as I can to purge out old fluid but I've also heard that having a computer program that can open the valves in the ABS would be a nice way to flush it out completely, But since I have been having this problem since the truck was nearly new I wonder if the ABS unit has been defective rather then worn out or old but haven't found anything on the internet that would support that thought.

If you are wondering why I didn't take the truck in under warranty for the ABS unit - this problem wasn't that obvious until after the warranty expired. I hadn't put many miles on it and I thought the problems were related to lack of use.


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groundhogy

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Posted: 02/26/19 10:47am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

On the Port/Starboard thing. Once you get used to it, it becomes the simplest, easiest, least confusing way to communicate where things are on any craft.
Plus i can pretend I’m still on my boat....

72cougarxr7

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Posted: 03/01/19 09:18pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I concur that the phenolic caliper pistons seem to be the cause of the Superduty sticking brake issue. I replaced all 4 calipers on my 2008 f350 last year, 1 piston in the rear and 1 on the front would stick and drag the brakes.
I had the same issue on a ranger I drove in high school.

On the rear of my F350, I was able to order new (not reman/rebuilt) Raybestos calipers from rock auto. They honestly looked better than oem quality.
I also siphoned the old fluid out of the master cylinder, put in fresh fluid, and let each caliper gravity bleed until fresh fluid came out. I plan on flushing the fluid once a year to keep fresh fluid in the system. Brake fluid absorbs moisture, which naturally settles to the bottom of the system, which is the calipers.

groundhogy

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Posted: 03/01/19 09:44pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Ok, I have been reading other forums the last couple of nights...

I am reading that some of the caliper remanufacturers will reuse the pistons if they look ok to save money.

I have also read that the majority of binding incidents occur with the pistons getting stuck more than the guide pins.

There is also a good engineering reason that they use phenolic. I just cant remember it. lol. Temperature insulation? Or corrosion of the wet brake fluid?

Also read one guy where I guess he ended up with two mismatched pieces and the guide pin holes on both parts were 0.030" off. So no slidy good.

Anyway, I have searched and found two companies that DO replace the pistons with new units.

Centric and NuGeon

I went to the Motorcraft site and they probably do, but I cant tell for sure by the verbiage.

I am searching local sources, but they are both available on Rock Ahuto.

Im planing Centric. Have an email out asking about their warranty.

Grit dog

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Posted: 03/01/19 10:21pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

72cougarxr7 wrote:

I concur that the phenolic caliper pistons seem to be the cause of the Superduty sticking brake issue. I replaced all 4 calipers on my 2008 f350 last year, 1 piston in the rear and 1 on the front would stick and drag the brakes.
I had the same issue on a ranger I drove in high school.

On the rear of my F350, I was able to order new (not reman/rebuilt) Raybestos calipers from rock auto. They honestly looked better than oem quality.
I also siphoned the old fluid out of the master cylinder, put in fresh fluid, and let each caliper gravity bleed until fresh fluid came out. I plan on flushing the fluid once a year to keep fresh fluid in the system. Brake fluid absorbs moisture, which naturally settles to the bottom of the system, which is the calipers.


I believe you're right. But no need to do brake fluid every year. Most people don't do it ever. Fwiw, I do a "slow" brake fluid exchange. Every year or 2 I suck the mater cyl dry on stuff and refill a couple times. Uses more brake fluid but it works!


"Yes Sir, Oct 10 1888, Those poor school children froze to death in their tracks. They did not even find them until Spring. Especially hard hit were the ones who had to trek uphill to school both ways, with no shoes." -Bert A.

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