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 > Flashpaq Tuner on 6.0 GM

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LIKE2BUILD

Decatur

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Posted: 06/11/19 01:57pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

kw/00 wrote:

Since I have a GM 6.0 I recommend the black bear auto tune. Really wakes up this engine, reduces TQ management

This is really the big issue on the GM 6.0L. These engines make really nice HP and torque, but to add longevity of the transmission they used torque management to choke off the engine so it didn't kill the tranny. As BenK stated, it's all about duty cycles and there is quite likely more torque the transmission can handle. By reducing the torque management you get more of the power the engine makes delivered to the transmission.


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ShinerBock

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Posted: 06/11/19 02:33pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

If the 6L90 can handle 556 hp and 551 lb-ft in the CTS-V or 580hp and 556 lb-ft in the ZL1 on the track, then I think it can handle what a 6.0L 2500 can put out unloaded. According to GM Authority spec sheets on the 6L90 the max horsepower it can handle in a gas truck is 452 hp and 531 lb-ft which is far from what a 6.0L will be able to achieve with just a tune.

Having worked for engine/auto manufacturers and being involved in testing, I can say the public assumption/perception of why things are the way that are, and the real reason as to why things are the way they are often are not the same. Also, what may have been the case decades ago may not still be today.

* This post was edited 06/11/19 02:45pm by ShinerBock *

BenK

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Posted: 06/11/19 02:57pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

A good analogy and will add...

Why isn't the GM 6.2L all aluminum in +8,600 lb GVWR trucks? Duty cycle...

What is the GVWR and GCWR of the 'cars' with high HP/Torque mated to the 6L90 ? How well would the 6L90E do with a 5,000 lb to 7,000 lb or larger trailer in tow? Duty cycle required to tow for hours in hot conditions and steep incline will kill it...of course stated 'unloaded', but this is a towing/RV forum/application...then again, most TV's will weigh more than those 'cars'...

Worked for and was partners in small firms supplying test stands to automotive industry, military and other industrial markets (and many other markets). Largest disc brake I've designed was a 48" dia at the outer swept area...most others were in the 17"-20" range and all had 100% duty cycle ratings. My designs were much smaller than GE's, Westinghouse's, Reliance's...because they were all designed decades ago and continued to be offered

Biggest test stand was for DOT testing tires and wheels. Locomotive traction motors were the only electric motors that had the duty cycle they spec'd out, which included a 100% duty cycle for the drum at max RPM/Max Load/Max Slip angle/etc. Their old ones used hydraulic's and did NOT have the duty cycle ours did, not the fine controls they required.

All are opinions on these freebie forums...some empirical...others theoretical based on learned knowledge to actual practice. Readers must decide for themselves on the info presented, or not...


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ShinerBock

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Posted: 06/11/19 03:52pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

On major reason why the 6.2L is not in the HD trucks is because it has an aluminum block which is not ideal for a gasoline HD truck. Cars like the the ZL1 is meant for the track. Not the one that goes in a strait line, the one that has turns and is constantly shifting up and down gears creating heat.

Going back to GM Authorities 6L90 spec sheet, the "maximum validated GVW" is 15,000 lbs and the max GCVW is 21,000 lbs.

Heat in a transmission is usually generally from slippage and/or constant high line pressure. If the 6L90's torque converter is locked and has enough clamping force to handle the amount of power and weight that a tuned 6.0L is rated for then there will be no slippage. Most transmissions that fail from added power is due to slippage, but as stated in the spec sheet, the 6L90 is rated to handle way more than what just a tune will do to a 6.0L even in a truck application.

The valve body line pressure is depended your right foot and engine load so it will get hot under constant high load with added power or not if the trans cooler cannot keep it in check. Added power has nothing to do with this heat and in fact added power may even help if the engine does not have to be at such a high load as often.

However, this is why tuners have tow tunes and unloaded tunes. Tow tuned generally have lower power numbers and alters shifting to be at optimum rpms with firmer shifts. Firmer shifts are to keep slippage between shifts at a minimum which reduces heat. Unloaded tunes generally have higher power numbers while keeping the buttery smooth shifts(more slippage) from the factory. So you select the tune and customize it based on how you will using your truck instead of being forced to drive a one size fits all tune made for applications/situations you will probably never drive your truck in.

ShinerBock

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Posted: 06/11/19 03:57pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I will add that if OEM's wanted their transmissions to last longer then they would tune every transmission to shift firmly as quickly as possible instead of these buttery smooth shift that crates more slippage, more clutch wear, and more heat. However, most people would not like a transmission that shifts this way so the OEM's tune them to shift smoother, even though it reduces longevity, to please most consumers.

philh

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Posted: 06/11/19 05:55pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

ShinerBock wrote:

I will add that if OEM's wanted their transmissions to last longer then they would tune every transmission to shift firmly as quickly as possible instead of these buttery smooth shift that crates more slippage, more clutch wear, and more heat. However, most people would not like a transmission that shifts this way so the OEM's tune them to shift smoother, even though it reduces longevity, to please most consumers.

You mean like Ford's DPS6 that was loved in Europe and absolutely hated in US?

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