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ascanio1

Napoli

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Posted: 07/04/19 03:01pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

opnspaces wrote:

I love the idea and know that you guys will have fond memories even if only half of the plan works out. Here's a few ideas I have after reading all the posts.
As will be evidenced below I'm partial to Yosemite. I've been going since I was a child and now my children go with me once a year in spring.
I would go to Yosemite from LAX, it's about a 6 hour drive. When I think if Yosemite I picture it as two separate parks even though it really is only one park. There is high country which is the bulk of the park. It consists of meadows and streams trees and great views. although at that time of year many of the streams will be small or dry. Also the high country is snowed in and closed most of the year and starts opening in June or July. If you go in the summer or early fall the high country is probably the best place to be.
Then there is Yosemite valley which is only about 7 miles long and 1 mile across. Yosemite valley is where you will see all and hear all the waterfalls. There are paved bike trails as well as a free bus system that circles most of the valley. BUT the waterfalls are fed by snow melt and will be mostly dry in the fall. By and large the best time to see Yosemite valley is late March or early April. The temperatures will be mild 68-73F (20-22C) and the waterfalls will be flowing. There are bike rentals in the valley, but honestly the bikes are horrible.

Yellowstone is huge. You could probably spend all two weeks there and feel like you haven't seen it all. Again watch for winter as it will snow.

Grand Canyon... I honestly have never seen it as a huge destination. Yes it's a big amazing looking canyon. But for an RVer I can't imagine it holding more than a day or two days worth of you attention. I would instead consider maybe a trip of Grand Canyon for a day or so and then over to Bryce Canyon and Zion national parks. They are about a 4 hour drive from the Grand Canyon.

Go late March to Late April, the crowds are much smaller as our kids are in school. But be aware our school spring breaks stagger around Easter causing higher prices and larger crowds. so late April would be best. You can go early May, but temperatures start to rise and crowds start to grow. By and large the busiest travel season in the US is between Memorial day and Labor day. That is when the kids are out of school for summer.
Figure
1 day flying into LAX plus getting rentals and shopping squared away.
1 day driving to Yosemite Valley (6 hours) and setting up camp.
4 days in the valley riding bikes, looking at waterfalls and such.
1 (11 hours) day driving to Grand Canyon with a stop at Hoover Dam.
(7 days so far)
2 days at Grand Canyon.
2 maybe 3 days at Bryce and Zion national parks.
1 day driving back to Los Angeles
(13 days so far)
probably a day to donate goods and drop off the RV and such.
(14 days)
WOW! Thank you! What a detailed and passionate note! Very much appreciated.

1. Yosemite in April, but not Easter, sounds a must do to put on our voting list!
2. Grand Canyon is a must! It may not be much to you Americans but to us Europeans it is part of America itself as much as Coca-Cola and Harley Davidson. How can we visit the US and not see The Grand Canyon. We may not do it on our first time around but it is a must, sooner or later.
3. Thanks for the dates heads-up!
4. Schedule planning seems perfect! We are going to keep it as the tentative plan, for now. Thank you!

opnspaces wrote:

On other thoughts.
Consider this a trip for the adults. At 2 and 4 the kids really wont remember the trip so make it one the adults want to do.
Yes. Planning will consider our childrens' needs but they certainly will not have a "vote" in the itinerary!

opnspaces wrote:

I believe most rental RV's have the option to also rent bedding and dishes, obviously at an added cost.
We were given heads-up about this and we decided to go with renting privately owned RVs from reliable websites that offer this service plus insurance.

opnspaces wrote:

We are a bit relaxed on driving in the US. You do not need a special license to drive or tow most RV's. Your regular old license will be good enough unless you are renting a HUGE RV which I seriously doubt you would even find to rent.
Check!

opnspaces wrote:

Most of the speed limits you will encounter on your trip will be around 70mph (112kmh) Typically everybody drives 5-8 mph over the limit in the cities and up to 15 mph in the open country. That being said I would keep it to 5-8 mph over, anything higher is just inviting an unfortunate stop from law enforcement.
Being Italians this will be the hardest advice to follow... Our fellow Italians will look at us with scorn if we don't get arrested for speeding at least once! Jokes apart, I was arrested in Georgia in 1985 for speeding on a rented open Corvette while chasing 2 pretty girls that I had just met at the Gold Club in Atlanta... At that time I was studying marketing at the Coca-Cola Company School for Marketing and I remember my mother's embarrassment and reprimands and my father's (private) compliments and pride that I got arrested doing two very Italian things: chasing girls and speeding! LOL... (I apologise to the moderators if I am not allowed to go OT on these matters).

Now I have a daughter so I will behave... promised!

opnspaces wrote:

It would probably be easier to buy 4 bikes, but the problem is getting rid of them after the trip is over. Same thought for a bike rack. Then again it might be cheaper to buy bikes and a rack and abandon them at the end than to rent them. I would look at Walmart.com or Target.com, (two of the largest retailers in the US) for bikes. You can pick up a 4 bike rack at Target for around $130 Make sure the rack fits a 2 inch receiver, don't buy the one that fits both 1 and 2 inch receivers as the adapter can be flimsy. Obviously you would want to physically visit the stores to purchase though you can usually do a purchase on the website with a ship to store option to pick the stuff up. The great thing about the internet is you can just search for a local charity center (also called thrift shop) to donate the bikes and carrier to as you get back to Los Angeles. These are typically run by Salvation Army, Goodwill and a large host of local churches and such.
This is a very good idea. We checked online and prices are not that crazy. I am sure that we can find a church that can use some extra bikes and the rack we can leave to the RV owner.

opnspaces wrote:

On top of mileage, rentals also typically have additional charges for running the generator and opening the awning.
Check.

opnspaces wrote:

Don't forget Los Angeles is huge (3 hours to drive South to North on a good day) with a host of attractions. The kids are probably a bit young, but a day trip to Disneyland in Anaheim would possibly be a good must see.
One wife suggested it and it is in our check list.

opnspaces wrote:

Good luck with the planning, I would love to visit Europe some day as you have a much longer history than we do.
True. But it is getting destroyed by our politicians so you better hurry! If you ever come, let us know, we live in the South of Italy, in Naples.

ascanio1

Napoli

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Posted: 07/04/19 03:04pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Check list:
-------------------------
1. Check for hidden costs as cleaning fees, full tank fees, mileage, etc.
2. Remember to buy provisions before starting.
3. Remember snacks for little ones (we may not be able to stop when they are hungry).
4. Consider renting a car nearby or consider renting mountain bikes?
5. We should not go on US holidays: higher prices, lesser choice.
6. Ask for TV with Netflix/Hulu?Vudu
7. Class A rides nicer than C
8. Pots & pans, utensils, flat ware, bowls, etc.
9 How do we launder clothes? Camps have these facilities. Remember to plan for it
10. Grilling equipment
11. Ask for an RV with rack for bicycles
12. Plan for sleeping/parking (RVParky+AllstaysApp+ParkadvisorApp)
13. Check driving license requirements (https://www.motorhome-usa.com/driver-license-rv-rental-usa)
14. Downhill: use the driving cautions of my age (low gear, not brakes)
15. Mountain bikes: check rental vs purchase prices: Walmart or Target or online and then gift them to a Church.
16. Racks for bicycles must fit 2 inch receivers, not adjustable (flimsy).
17. Two days between water refill and waste disposal
18. It will take a day to get the RV provisioned and ready and then another day to return it and get to the airport.

bikendan

Camano Island, Wash.

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Posted: 07/05/19 02:34am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

ascanio1 wrote:

Questions:


A) In Parks:
1. can we light fires?
2. can we fish?
3. can we hunt (*) small game?
4. can we swim/row in lakes and rivers?

B) Outside Parks, in the wild:
1. can we light fires?
2. can we fish?
3. can we hunt (*) small game?
4. can we swim/row in lakes and rivers?

(*) Assuming that foreigners can obtain a permit and rent rifles legally.
PS: we love your first two amendments! Especially the first one! And the second one is there to protect the first one (ok it's there to protect against Gov. tyranny but it sounds better to say it the way I did)!


forget hunting and renting rifles. not going to happen, especially from California. the 2nd Amendment doesn't fly there.[emoticon]
fishing will be limited, depending on where you go.
my wife worked in the Napa Valley wineries and we have numerous friends and adopted nieces/nephews from Italy. saying you're from Naples explains a lot.[emoticon] She has a number of former co-workers from the Naples area.
we have stayed with them in Tuscany, Venice and Lake Como. my wife absolutely LOVES Italy!


Dan- Firefighter, Retired">, Shawn- Musician/Entrepreneur">, Zoe- Faithful Golden Retriever(RIP">), 2014 Ford F150 3.5 EcoboostMax Tow pkg, 2016 PrimeTime TracerAIR 255 w/4pt Equalizer and 5 Mtn. bikes and 2 Road bikes


Chock Full o' Nuts

GA

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Posted: 07/05/19 11:28am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

ascanio1 wrote:

LOL! I loved the compassion for the Gerbil! Did it get a full funeral back at home?


LOL, we actually did. You have to get the whole picture, though. My 14yo daughter had raised gerbils from the age of 5. She made little clothes for them. They wore Barbie crowns and rode around in the Barbie car. When we went on our 60-day tour of the US, we couldn't find anyone willing to take the 9 gerbils, so we packed them into two cages, Boys Dorm and Girls Dorm, and transported them around the country in the shower tub. When Devereaux died unexpectedly, Daughter was devastated. Her dad so compassionately dug a hole right there in the Grand Tetons, to which my daughter was completely horrified--No way was she putting her precious gerbil in the ground for wolves to dig up! So, I ended up wrapping him up in plastic and storing him next to the popsicles. For YEARS the joke in our family was "Don't eat anything in Mom's freezer!" We buried him in our "gerbil graveyard" when we got home.


"Those who dwell...among the beauties and mysteries of the earth are never alone or weary of life."--Rachel Carson, environmentalist, 1956


2009 Ford F250 XL
2006 Dutchmen 25F
Me & DH in non-parenting mode!


opnspaces

San Diego Ca

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Posted: 07/05/19 02:41pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Hunting would probably be a no go, but there are many gun ranges including indoors in the cities where you can rent a gun and do some target practice.


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CharlesinGA

South of Atlanta, Georgia

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Posted: 07/08/19 01:50pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

A Class C with a rear corner bed and a front cab over bed is doable. Two adults in the cab over, and two in the rear bed, and convert the dinette to a bed at night for the kids. Biggest issue is having enough SAFE seats and seat belts for everyone. Few Class C's are set up for six, and both of the kids will be required by law in most states to be in car seats. These will be very important issues when you begin looking at RV's

There are smaller rental companies and even individuals that own several motorhomes to rent, but you need the security of a well maintained motorhome and a company that can resolve problems should they arise.

I highly suggest you going on Google Maps (desktop or laptop) and finding some of these locations and using it to determine distances. This will quickly be an eye opener for you. (I say use the windows/browser version as I cannot get the Android version of Google Maps to let me pick to random points to determine distances, but only figures distance from present location to a single point). Also switch from default to satellite view, and also try terrain view. Its an eyeopener. You will be at much higher elevations than you are used to, so breath deeply and take it easy till you get accustomed to the altitude.

Spend some evenings reading up on the national parks on their web sites, and elsewhere, and watch some good Youtube videos of some of these parks to see what it is like to visit them and get an idea of time.

I highly suggest, since we are talking small children, watching Less Junk, More Journey and their National Park videos. They have several playlists of videos and one is of their various National Park visits. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T1tVkUkf........&list=PLsbCfw4A0PRpFgUEpkqt6w12XaBt6yxE9
Also do not miss out on National Monuments, which are also managed by the National Park Service. There are many of them, and all are well worth seeing. You will see National Parks abbreviated at NP and National Monuments as NM (not to be confused with the US state of New Mexico) when people are discussing them online.

Lots of good online info to allow you to plan a doable trip that will not wear you out. You need at least one day a week to take a break and reset, do laundry, etc. Plan on limiting your trip, there is always another year to come and visit.

Charles

* This post was edited 07/08/19 02:13pm by CharlesinGA *

CharlesinGA

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Posted: 07/08/19 02:08pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

ascanio1 wrote:

Check list:
-------------------------
1. Check for hidden costs as cleaning fees, full tank fees, mileage, etc. absolutely
2. Remember to buy provisions before starting. The American west is huge, however, so is Wal-Mart, so yes, buy enough to get by a few days, but never hesitate to stop at a Wal-Mart to get whatever you missed.
3. Remember snacks for little ones (we may not be able to stop when they are hungry). kids are a huge consideration, and that is why I suggested the Less Junk, More Journey videos, as they have a small child, you will pick up on a lot of what they do.
4. Consider renting a car nearby or consider renting mountain bikes?
5. We should not go on US holidays: higher prices, lesser choice.
6. Ask for TV with Netflix/Hulu?Vudu
7. Class A rides nicer than C
8. Pots & pans, utensils, flat ware, bowls, etc.
9 How do we launder clothes? Camps have these facilities. Remember to plan for it
10. Grilling equipment
11. Ask for an RV with rack for bicycles
12. Plan for sleeping/parking (RVParky+AllstaysApp+ParkadvisorApp) Looks like you have that covered, but also add Campendium, Next Exit (for fuel and services), RV Life Apps campground review section (which replaced RVParkReviews). Also, The Allstays app is no longer updated, only the online website has the latest info.
13. Check driving license requirements (https://www.motorhome-usa.com/driver-license-rv-rental-usa) Motorhome rental people will be extremely familiar with this and their web sites may help or you can email them for details of your situation. In the US, I don't think any states require a special license for RV's of the size you are considering, but being international, it may be different.
14. Downhill: use the driving cautions of my age (low gear, not brakes) If the Motorhome has a TOW/HAUL switch on the gear shift lever, use it all the time. You will probably have to reactivate it each start up. It should gear down with a touch of the brakes, but don't hesitate to if it fails to gear down.
15. Mountain bikes: check rental vs purchase prices: Walmart or Target or online and then gift them to a Church.
16. Racks for bicycles must fit 2 inch receivers, not adjustable (flimsy). RV rental companies will be able to help on this, from what I have read, there are no bike racks approved by the rack manufacturer for use on RV's (due to vibration) and the RV may not even have a hitch receiver, to prevent the rental from being used to tow. Check carefully with the rental companies.
17. Two days between water refill and waste disposal
18. It will take a day to get the RV provisioned and ready and then another day to return it and get to the airport.


richardcoxid

Idaho Falls, ID

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Posted: 07/08/19 02:51pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Some helpful information about YSNP (some general items apply to GTNP also)

YNP is BIG!, about 45 miles E/W and about 65 miles N/S (2.2 mil. Acres total). The “figure 8 grand loop” road inside the park is about 140 miles around. The lower loop is 96 miles and the upper loop is 70 miles around and yes, it is bigger than the states of Rhode Island and Delaware combined.

Whatever time that you think you will need to see YNP you better double it, or to say it another way is that you will see one half as much as you planned on in the allotted time. The Bison think that they own the road (they do!) and will slow down the traffic to walking speed or stop all traffic for 1/4 mile or more blocking both directions of travel, the thermal attractions also tie up traffic and with a 5 month long summer tourist season that coincides with a 5 month long road construction season and a 45 MPH radar controlled speed limit it will take about a full day to see each loop and then you will only see the main attractions. In addition to the occasional construction delays they will also sometimes close whole sections of road (for uninterrupted night construction) between 10 PM and 8 AM in the morning, if you are running late and get caught at night in the wrong area it CAN be a LONG way around to your CG! (The entrance stations will have current construction information or go on line to check it out)

Then there is the elevation- YNP ranges from a low at Mammoth- 6239 ft to 7784 ft at Fishing Bridge or higher if you go hiking and there are passes on the grand loop road that are close to 8000 ft or so! Drink plenty of liquids and pace yourself when walking.

I recommend that you get up EARLY, leave the CG and be back by 4 or 6 PM have dinner and be sitting in your recliner drinking a cool one when your neighbor drags himself back to the CG at 8-10 PM. Remember that from mid May to mid July in YNP the sun doesn't set until about 9:00- 9:15 PM then there is a long and bright twilight.

Cell Phone Service- Only at the major visitor centers, otherwise non-existent!

Clothing- Especially in the early or late season it is not unusual to have a 30 or even the occasional 40 degree temperature change throughout the day. Dress with easily shed layers of clothing. Also dress in bright easily seen clothing. I am sure that we all have been to a sporting event, parade or Disney World etc. and we blink our eyes and our partner/child has disappeared. My DIL was born and raised in HI, you guessed it, every Xmas, b-day or Father's Day I receive a Hawaiian shirt. One of them is shiny black with 4-5 inch dia. bright flowers. Not many of them in Wyoming and in YSNP, that is what I wear. If your partner has on a Violet blouse and a Orange scarf with a Pink hat I guarantee that she will be the only one within the boundaries of either NP. It can save you a few anxious moments.

Water- Now I will have to contradict myself, at the altitude of YNP yes, drink lots of water! HOWEVER, be aware that the flush toilet restrooms are in the major tourist areas- Mammoth, Canyon, Fishing Bridge, Lake Hotel, Bridge Bay, Grant Village, Old Faithful, Madison Junction etc. The geyser basins and other thermal attractions areas only have pit toilets. I have seen the pit toilet line at the lower Geyser Basin (2 R/Rs) 25 or more feet long (bless the tour buses) So be smart about drinking your water and use the major tourist area R/Rs before leaving the area! I.e. “Never pass up a flush toilet!”

Sun- At YSNP altitude the Sun is intense (uv) have and apply sunscreen, wear that old floppy wide brim sun hat, wear Sunglasses!

If your luck is like mine Old Faithful will have just erupted when you get there and you will have up to a hour and 10 to 15 minutes wait for the next one. Tour the O/F Geyser basin while waiting. O/F INN is a must see, reportedly the largest LOG building in the U.S. (Meals in the O/F Inn dinning room are “A OK” also.

We have lived about 110 miles from West Yellowstone, MT since 1964, go to YSNP 3-4 times a summer (normally before Memorial Day and after Labor Day) and haven't seen it all yet! So don’t be discouraged that you didn’t have the time to see all of it. Just plan on coming back another time!

I honestly don’t mean to scare or discourage you but to give you a heads up as to what to expect! After all there was 4.1 million visitors in 2015! As far as I know we didn’t lose one of them. Except those who by their own stupidity step off the board walks into BOILING HOT water and ignoring the warnings about the WILD ANIMALS! That is called purifying the gene pool!

Note I have seen on this blog and others about folks “day tripping” from YSNP to GTNP, it is done all the time (myself included) however remember this is BIG country and with the speed limits, animals and thermal attractions you will be doing a LOT of slow driving. From Grant Village Visitor Center (extreme S/E corner of the lower loop road) to Jackson, WY is about 80 miles with Coulter Bay being about 1/2 way then from Grant Village you have to add the distance to your CG it will be a Long days trip!

A point of Coulter Bay (GTNP) clarification- there are two (2) CG’s at Coulter Bay, One the “Coulter Bay RV Park” a full service “RV Park” with FHU’S that takes reservations. The other is the “Coulter Bay Campground “ has no hookups and doesn’t take reservations. Both have about 300 sites and are basically across the road from each other.

The Gros Ventre CG in GTNP (about 5 miles north of Jackson and about 4 miles east toward the town of Kelly, right side of the road) is about 300 sites (including about 30 sites that are electric only) has no hookups and doesn’t take reservations.

When in the Jackson area I highly recommend seeing the Bar J Chuckwagon dinner show! If you go, MAKE RESERVATIONS and BE THERE EARLY TO PICK UP YOUR MEAL TICKETS/ TABLE SEATING ASSIGNMENTS! They seat you by when you show up to get your tickets NOT by your reservation number. Tim, their fiddle player has won the "Idaho state old time fiddle contest 7 times and the US open fiddle championship twice". If you decide to go you will sit at picnic type of bench seats/table, they get pretty hard, I recommend that you take along a blanket/pads to sit on. We day trip it there 2-4 times every summer just to see them! Disclaimer- We have no financial or other interest in the Bar J only that it will be the best $$ value for your money on your trip! Check out their website.

http://www.barjchuckwagon.com

Also in Jackson check out the “COWBOY” bar, the bar stools are saddles and the # of Silver Dollars in the bar. The Wort Hotel Bar (just around the corner from the Cowboy Bar) also has Silver Dollars imbedded in the Bar


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ascanio1

Napoli

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Posted: 07/13/19 08:37am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I cannot see images because I am unable to correctly set my forum preferences. I cannot see what you posted.

bikendan wrote:


forget hunting and renting rifles. not going to happen, especially from California. the 2nd Amendment doesn't fly there.
[emoticon]
Very, very sad. What made America so great is your forefathers' foresight into liberty and freedom. When you will have become like Europe, it will be too late...

bikendan wrote:


my wife worked in the Napa Valley wineries and we have numerous friends and adopted nieces/nephews from Italy. saying you're from Naples explains a lot.
[emoticon]
She has a number of former co-workers from the Naples area.
we have stayed with them in Tuscany, Venice and Lake Como. my wife absolutely LOVES Italy!
Come visit our country. I will help with all you need!

ascanio1

Napoli

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Posted: 07/13/19 08:42am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Chock Full o' Nuts wrote:

She made little clothes for them. They wore Barbie crowns and rode around in the Barbie car.
Pictures! Pictures! We want to see pictures! LOL this is soooooooooooo cool! My wife will love to see gerbils with a barbie crown in a car!

Your daughter must be creative and imaginative. Thumbs up to her!

Now I know to check the freezers from rented RVs! I will ad it to the check list.

Check list:
-------------------------
1. Check for hidden costs as cleaning fees, full tank fees, mileage, etc.
2. Remember to buy provisions before starting.
3. Remember snacks for little ones (we may not be able to stop when they are hungry).
4. Consider renting a car nearby or consider renting mountain bikes?
5. We should not go on US holidays: higher prices, lesser choice.
6. Ask for TV with Netflix/Hulu?Vudu
7. Class A rides nicer than C
8. Pots & pans, utensils, flat ware, bowls, etc.
9 How do we launder clothes? Camps have these facilities. Remember to plan for it
10. Grilling equipment
11. Ask for an RV with rack for bicycles
12. Plan for sleeping/parking (RVParky+AllstaysApp+ParkadvisorApp)
13. Check driving license requirements (https://www.motorhome-usa.com/driver-license-rv-rental-usa)
14. Downhill: use the driving cautions of my age (low gear, not brakes)
15. Mountain bikes: check rental vs purchase prices: Walmart or Target or online and then gift them to a Church.
16. Racks for bicycles must fit 2 inch receivers, not adjustable (flimsy).
17. Two days between water refill and waste disposal
18. It will take a day to get the RV provisioned and ready and then another day to return it and get to the airport.
19. Check for dead gerbils in the freezer unit if we rent !

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