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 > Dually tire pressure?

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adamis

Northern California

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Posted: 06/21/19 01:09pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I've run 80psi front and rear according to the max inflation rating on the sidewalls. It does ride a bit rough, especially on Highway 101 South of San Jose, but that's just California's mismanaged Highway system at fault...

I've always inflated all of my vehicles to the maximum or within 5 to 10 psi of the max rated pressure on the sidewall. Right now I'm running 80psi on an 80psi max tire. The suspension is what is designed to absorb the bumps, using your tires to accomplish that is compromising safety for comfort in my humble opinion. I will grant that if your running 65psi on a max 80psi tire your fine but if your running 40psi on an 80 psi tire with a loaded vehicle you might be taking on unnecessary risk.

Will a problem arise? Likely not but if I hit one of California's signature freeway swallow my truck type potholes with 5000lbs in the bed, doing 70mph, I'd much rather have a high pressure tire that is ready for the abuse than a half pressure tire and risk a pinch flat or a damaged rim.

I also ride with about 30psi in the Airbags as well. It isn't necessary really on my dually and sometimes I try without or go up to 60psi just to see how it feels. I do this to reduce rolling on curvy roads or to ensure my lights aren't blinding drivers at night.


1999 F350 Dually with 7.3 Diesel
2000 Bigfoot 10.6 Camper


finsruskw

Earlville, IA

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Posted: 06/21/19 02:33pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Yeah, it rides a bit rough, after all , it's a truck not a cushy 4 wheeler.
Get used to it.

bighatnohorse

Gig Harbor - Cave Creek

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Posted: 06/22/19 08:29am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Kayteg1 wrote:

Michelin inflation tables
As I said, manufacturer give inflation tables as you can see on Michelin sample I pasted above.
In my case the tables start at 35 psi, what give the tire ca 1800 lb load capacity. My empty dually has about 1/2 of that, but don't think I would drive it with 18 psi in rear.
Even Michelin is not highlighting it, the 35 psi is min they allow.

Thanks for that link. I think that I need to air down the duals when driving empty.
It feels like the proverbial "one ton truck" now.


2014 Lance 1181
'15 F350 6.7 diesel dually long bed
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“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness. . ." -Mark Twain


Grit dog

Black Diamond, WA

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Posted: 06/22/19 09:57am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Adam is and finscrew you’re missing the point. No one is suggesting running 40psi in the rear fully loaded down, although that may still be a safe pressure for a dually with a moderate load.
But running high pressure in the rear when empty is just plain silly. I mean, it won’t hurt anything but if you’re running empty for a while and have the means to air down and then back up easily when you need to then why would you subject yourself and your truck to the abuse?


03 Arctic Fox 860
07 Dodge 2500 deezul
"Obviously I don't want to overload my truck and be unsafe, but the reality is the truck is way more capable than the 10K GVWR they put on the sticker.
KJ"

Kayteg1

California > Nevada

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Posted: 06/22/19 10:03am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Side question for Ford owners.
My 2017 dually have tire valves at such angles that none of standard chucks work.
The straight tip is too straight and will not seat well on inner valve. The angled one is too angled and same situation. The small holes in my alloy wheels are not giving much play. I tried to bend straight chuck, but broke thread instead. So anybody found a chuck that fits well?





toddb

az

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Posted: 06/22/19 10:40am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B017S3........_yo_dt_b_search_asin_image?ie=UTF8&psc=1

I use this one on my 15, same wheels. I did have to put a slight bend at the head to get into the inner rear.

TxGearhead

Texas

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Posted: 06/23/19 05:59pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Kayteg1 wrote:

Side question for Ford owners.
My 2017 dually have tire valves at such angles that none of standard chucks work.
The straight tip is too straight and will not seat well on inner valve. The angled one is too angled and same situation. The small holes in my alloy wheels are not giving much play. I tried to bend straight chuck, but broke thread instead. So anybody found a chuck that fits well?


I had/have similar issues. My Ram had both valves located next to each other, coming out the same hole in the alloy wheels. Last time I had them rotated I had them separated to 180 degrees apart. I had Milton extensions on the inner valve and saw some evidence of them hitting the outer valve. The inner valve is rubber, the outer SS. I talked to Discount Tire about replacing that inner valve with a metal one. You know....the extensions causing the polar moment of inertia to sling the extensions around and cause the rubber stem to fail. Not that I would overthink it or anything.
I'm at 36 psi. Running to Lake Charles again tomorrow. Report forthcoming....


2018 Ram 3500 CC LB DRW 4X4 Cummins Aisin Laramie Pearl White
2014 Montana High Country 305RL
2008 Bigfoot 25C9.4
2014 NauticStar 21 ShallowBay 150HP Yamaha
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TxGearhead

Texas

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Posted: 06/23/19 06:07pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Grit dog wrote:

Adam is and finscrew you’re missing the point. No one is suggesting running 40psi in the rear fully loaded down, although that may still be a safe pressure for a dually with a moderate load.
But running high pressure in the rear when empty is just plain silly. I mean, it won’t hurt anything but if you’re running empty for a while and have the means to air down and then back up easily when you need to then why would you subject yourself and your truck to the abuse?


THANKS!

ryoung

Indiana

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Posted: 06/24/19 02:04pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

To the OP. If you're referring to what pressure to run unloaded, take you truck to a scale and weigh each axle. Then use Nexen tire load chart to determine the correct pressure for the load the tire is carrying. Do the same if you carry a load.

Many tire manufacturers will state that the pressure listed on the tire sidewall is only for the maximum load the tire is designed to carry. And is not a recommenced tire pressure setting for your vehicle that may have varying load conditions.

One poster mentioned that he runs the sidewall listed pressure all the time and is willing to sacrifice comfort for safety. Wrong. Wrong. Quite the contrary. When running 80 psi on a light truck dully that is unloaded, you compromise the tires traction ability in both braking an acceleration.

ryoung


2018 Ram 3500 SRW Diesel
2019 Wolf Creek 840


ryoung

Indiana

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Posted: 06/24/19 03:51pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Quote:

80 front
65 rear

When the truck is empty a fair percentage of the total weight is on the front tires, particularly if it's a diesel.


What difference does the front tire pressure have to do with whether the truck is loaded or unloaded. Obviously by simple mathematics, the front will be carrying the greater percentage of total weight when unloaded as opposed to when the truck is loaded, which now has the greater percentage of the total truck weight.

I'll bet the sticker on the door pillar doesn't recommend 80 psi for the front tires.

On the '04 Dodge 3500 dually that I previously owned the recommended tire pressures were 55 front and 65 rear. And that 65 psi pressure for the rear was the recommended pressure at the maximum GAWR of a little over 9,000 lbs.

So why do you put more air in the front tires than you do in the rear tires, when the front tires are carrying lesser weight than the rears?

This is not the manufactures recommendation. And as I said before you are degrading the tires performance.

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