Good Sam Club Open Roads Forum: Travel Trailers: Bottom damage
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 > Bottom damage

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richclover

WY

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Posted: 06/23/19 10:44am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

myredracer wrote:

Sounds like the TT got a good workout! [emoticon] Unfortunately, TT manufacturers typically use the lowest rated and least substantial components possible. 5K miles on a TT is nothing...

I would suggest RV scrim tape there. It's a lot thicker than gorilla tape and should be tougher for a location like that. Wash the darco fabric with soap and water then use alcohol to get it good and clean so the tape adheres well.

Tires look way too close. Original size tires I assume? The usual cause of this is springs that have flattened out and isn't uncommon. Hard to tell in the photos but one set of springs does look flattened. What is the TT GVWR and what are the axle ratings? There should be a white sticker on each axle that will give you the rating. Have you ever taken the TT through a scale to get it's weights?

Do not use a 2" lift. Need to determine why so little clearance. This is a standard frame, axle, spring and tire setup and nothing unusual.

The damage to the darco fabric looks different from front to rear tire. Is the TT level to slightly nose down when hooked up?

While in there inspecting things:

I would inspect the plastic spring bushings because they can wear out in as little as a couple thousand miles. Check spring hanger holes because they can get ovalized. Perhaps check the axle tubes to see if they still have the correct camber/arch. Check for unusual tire wear as it could be an indication of a bent axle or misalignment. A pair of Dexter EZ-flex equalizers would be a good idea (along with their wet bolts).

*IF* it turns out the axle tubes have lost their camber (not unusual either), you might look at using the optional 3" dia. tube instead of standard 2-3/8". Al-ko has good tech. info. here on what's available. Stronger springs might be a good idea but don't know if they're directly interchangeable.

A set of shock absorbers can help prevent this. We installed them on our TT and help a lot.


We put a "test" on it! Given the really poor condition of some interstates we traveled we were very lucky.

Thanks for the good suggestions! Right, it's a standard Coleman TT, Lippert components. See my other post WRT GY tires and weights.

I like the idea of installing shocks and will investigate further.


Rich
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ktmrfs

Portland, Oregon

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Posted: 06/23/19 11:33am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

richclover wrote:

ktmrfs wrote:

There is IMHO to little tire clearance. Either it was built with to little clearance, or the tires are larger than the OEM tires, or the springs have lost the arc.

If it was my trailer and fixing it correctly isn't covered under warranty, I'd find a shop that can do an axle flip to get proper clearance.


I don't think an axle flip will will help. As shown, the axles are mounted below the springs.


correct. I suffered from a bit of "brain fade" when I looked at the picture.

The larger tires of 1" larger diameter only cut about 1/2" of clearance. From the looks it is several inches from the needed clearance.


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richclover

WY

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Posted: 06/23/19 04:18pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

mgirardo wrote:

The weight probably doesn't have much to do with it. You stuffed larger tires in a wheel well not designed for tires of that size. You will need to make more room for the tires to keep them from rubbing.

-Michael


Thanks, Michael, but my tire shop, and me, figured a half inch shouldn’t have made any difference. Last spring, installing the Goodyear tires.

Making more room will only happen with suspension modifications. Question is “what”.

First stop will be the tire shop in the morning.

CharlesinGA

South of Atlanta, Georgia

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Posted: 06/23/19 04:24pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Springs look way too flat. Should have a lot more curve/arch in them that what I see in those.

Charles

tralertrash

kansas city mo

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Posted: 06/23/19 04:43pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I had a similar issue with an older Salem F/R. I went from stock (3500#) to 4800# springs and it added about 2" more clearance. Simple afternoon job.

Huntindog

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Posted: 06/23/19 06:00pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Per Dexter and Lippert: 3" inch MINIMUM clearance from the top of the tires to the wheelwell.
Also, bump stops are requiered to limit upward axle travel.

There are several ways to get more clearance. You can add a 2" square tube between the frame and the spring hangers... Lots of units are made that way from the factory. You can get longer spring hangers... Some units come from the factory with spring hangers that have several holes to adjust the height.
You can install lift blocks between the axles and springs. I have done this on two TTs.
You can install springs with more leaves.
All of these methods will work. My present TT has a combination of a thicker spring pack, and a small lift block installed, to get the needed height. I only use solid steel lift blocks, and never more than 2" thick. As always, doing it correctly is IMPORTANT... Any of this done wrong ..... Can be an issue.




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richclover

WY

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Posted: 06/23/19 06:13pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Huntindog wrote:

Per Dexter and Lippert: 3" inch MINIMUM clearance from the top of the tires to the wheelwell.
Also, bump stops are requiered to limit upward axle travel.

There are several ways to get more clearance. You can add a 2" square tube between the frame and the spring hangers... Lots of units are made that way from the factory. You can get longer spring hangers... Some units come from the factory with spring hangers that have several holes to adjust the height.
You can install lift blocks between the axles and springs. I have done this on two TTs.
You can install springs with more leaves.
All of these methods will work. My present TT has a combination of a thicker spring pack, and a small lift block installed, to get the needed height. I only use solid steel lift blocks, and never more than 2" thick. As always, doing it correctly is IMPORTANT... Any of this done wrong ..... Can be an issue.



Thanks for the good info!

Local tire shop does lots of trailer work and is the first stop tomorrow. There is an RV dealer, recommended, in Layton, UT, that does RV repairs and maintenance. They’ll be the next stop. It’ll get fixed before the next boondocks trip [emoticon]

WayneAt63044

St. Louis, MO

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Posted: 06/23/19 06:33pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I did the heavier springs exactly like tralertrash above did and it raised the trailer 2". A lot more arch in the springs now. My axle weights at the scale were less than yours for my 7,800 lbs GCWR trailer.

I had a broken spring on the interstate once and replaced the springs with 1,750 OEM springs and they were too flat. I'm convinced most of those springs are manufactured to barely meet spec, if that.

You might replace the springs as a first step to see how it goes. Your axle weights were awfully close to 7,000 max anyway at 6,780.

I then bought some darco plastic material at the hardware store and sealed them in place to cover the scuffed wheel well areas above the tires and then screwed them also outside of where the tire would rub if it should happen again.

Been good for 2 years now. Mine is a Lippert frame, too.


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ppine

Northern Nevada

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Posted: 06/23/19 09:27pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

My first thought is drive slower.
Some roads are terrible. You have to keep slowing until you are not beating up your rig.
No one rides in a TT so the ride can be really harsh.
Consider adding shock absorbers.

JRscooby

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Posted: 06/24/19 06:38am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Am I the only one to ask how far over the axle rating are you running?

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