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 > Wireless Fridge Thermometer - Are they accurate?

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kmb1966

Lake Charles

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Posted: 07/03/19 12:19pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I have tried a variety of wireless thermometers in the refrigerator and freezer compartments. Currently using an AcuRite 00986 designed to work inside the refrigerator and freezer compartments. These things over the years have proven to be helpful and sort of drive me nuts. They are helpful to let you know there is a problem with the temperature and have 'alarms' that will go off. Hurtful because I think at times they are OFF in accuracy. Using several old fashioned thermometers and a dial frig thermometer, I have seen anywhere from 5-10 degree difference from the digital to the old fashioned thermometer. 5-10 degree difference in the refrigerator can be the difference between thinking your food has spoiled and it not really being a problem. The digital seems to always show a HIGHER temperature than the old fashioned thermometers. Anyone have any experience using these? I keep fresh batteries in these babies but I think they are just inaccurate despite the name Acurite.

Lwiddis

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Posted: 07/03/19 01:30pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I wouldn’t want one. Even covered my battery voltage gauge so I’d quit checking it.


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SidecarFlip

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Posted: 07/03/19 01:44pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Accuracy all depends on the quality of the non-contact sensor whereas an analog temp sensor depends on a bi-metallic strip. My Accurite seems pretty close but then all one needs to be concerned with is how close to freezing is the compartment.


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Gdetrailer

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Posted: 07/03/19 04:11pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

SidecarFlip wrote:

Accuracy all depends on the quality of the non-contact sensor whereas an analog temp sensor depends on a bi-metallic strip. My Accurite seems pretty close but then all one needs to be concerned with is how close to freezing is the compartment.


[emoticon]

OP isn't talking about IR guns here (no contact) and most old school analog "bi-metallic" thermometers now days are pretty cheaply built and not very plentiful to find.

OP is talking about using a WIRELESS (two pieces, a remote transmitter which goes in the fridge and the display unit which can sit on a counter and no wires connecting the two parts) thermometer to monitor the inside temps of a fridge.

I am not a fan of wireless thermometers for this purpose, the constant near freezing to sub freezing temps found in fridge/freezers quickly zaps the life out of the batteries in the remote sensor.

This can cause inaccuracies in readings and tends to zap battery life considerably.

I prefer to use indoor/outdoor WIRED type which have a wired remote probe. I simply slip the remote wire in between the door seal in a spot which will not interfere with getting things in and out of the fridge (think HINGE SIDE of the door).

Then tie or stick probe to one of the shelves.

The batteries are now outside of the fridge and are not affected by the near freezing or sub freezing temps inside the fridge..

Wired are also much more reliable, should not have any issue finding wired types for $5-$20.. AMAZON SEARCH FOR WIRED THERMOMETER

pauldub

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Posted: 07/03/19 04:31pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

The thermal mass of a sensor versus a glass bulb thermometer is going to be very different. Because of this, one will more quickly respond to change than the other. Hopefully in a steady state condition they will be within maybe 5 degrees of each other.

Dutch_12078

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Posted: 07/03/19 07:27pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

We've used an AcuRite dual sensor refrigerator/freezer wireless thermometer in two motorhomes so far and been very pleased with the performance. The sensor batteries last 6-8 months and the display batteries 10-12 months.

AcuRite 00986 Refrigerator Thermometer


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D.E.Bishop

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Posted: 07/03/19 08:10pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Most thermometers have a listed +/- percent of accuracy on the box or the instruction sheet. "No guarantee", just an estimate. Try a professional instrument company, they guarantee accuracy.


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RCMAN46

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Posted: 07/04/19 10:00am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Accuracy is not as important as repeat-ability. I have found my Acurite wireless thermometer is very consistent with a dial thermometer that I have in the fridge. They almost always are within 2 degrees of each other.
So if you find the wireless reports 2 degrees high or low just take that into account when you take a reading.
I use Energizer Ultimate Lithium batteries(good for -40 f) in my sensors and even in the freezer I get about two years service.

Airdaile

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Posted: 07/04/19 11:13am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I've used remote thermometers from La Crosse for quite a while and they seem to work fairly well. I have a 2 channel that reads inside, outside and fridge temps.





wa8yxm

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Posted: 07/04/19 04:35pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

The wireless ones (Well the quality ones) are more likely to be accurate but you need to know how to calibrate them This can best be done at 32 degrees but depending on how accrate you want them you will need DISTILLED water and of course a water proof "Sleeve" for the transmitter.

one indication of accuracy is to put the two units (indoor and remote) side by side.


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