Good Sam Club Open Roads Forum: To DP or not DP
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 > To DP or not DP

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Tom/Barb

Oak Harbor, Wa

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Posted: 07/19/19 08:38am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

When you don't do maintenance on the gasser why would you worry about doing it on the diesel?

Find the largest coach you can afford, with the interior you like best. because you will spend a lot of time in it.


2000 Newmar mountain aire 4081 DP, ISC/350 Allison 6 speed, Wrangler JK toad.

azdryheat

Tucson, AZ

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Posted: 07/19/19 08:41am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Seems to me DPs are built a little better.


2013 Chevy 3500HD CC dually
2014 Voltage 3600 toy hauler
2011 Harley Ultra Limited
2016 RZR 900


Tom/Barb

Oak Harbor, Wa

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Posted: 07/19/19 08:45am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Bumpyroad wrote:

NOTE that folks here who say that maintenance on a dp is not expensive,will confess to doing their own work on them.
buy what you need, not what you are "talked into".
bumpy


I don't believe cost of ownership over all will be any more on a large well built diesel pusher than it will be on a cheap smaller coach, and the pleasure of owning far exceeds the cheaper coach.

IMHO it is much better to buy a coach like the Newell above than any of the smaller entry level.

specially when you are full timing.

Tom/Barb

Oak Harbor, Wa

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Posted: 07/19/19 08:47am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

mike brez wrote:

Get This One and call it a day.


yeah that ! beautiful !

but a little long in the tooth. (138k miles).

way2roll

Wilmington NC

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Posted: 07/19/19 09:07am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Rick Jay wrote:



Are you thinking about getting a brand new rig or a newer used unit?

Good Luck,

~Rick


New has it's advantages - mostly in terms of warranty, but the beating on depreciation far outweighs that for us. Also, a used coach "should" have a lot of the bugs worked out. Thinking 2-5 year old MH is the sweet spot we will be looking at. New enough to have the stuff we like, old enough to have a lot of the depreciation already and put us in the level of coach we want at a price point we can afford. DW hasn't fully released the budget yet, but thinking the $125 - 175k range.

way2roll

Wilmington NC

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Posted: 07/19/19 09:14am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

mike brez wrote:

Get This One and call it a day.


Funny, I have ALWAYS had a sweet spot for Newells and have considered going older to get one. I really want a good reliable, well built coach. But everything is a concession in RV's when price is a consideration. in order to get nicer coach and stay on budget you have to go older. In this case a Newell puts us about a decade or more older than we want. But I've considered it and keep my eyes open. Foretravel and Prevost are also always on my wish list.

The other issue is size. While we want a larger coach, not sure I want a 45' one. Was thinking more along the lines of 36-40. But , as we all know, you can't ever go big enough when full timing. But my main focus is getting the right coach with the right floorplan.

folivier

Southeast Louisiana

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Posted: 07/19/19 09:55am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Couple comments, 138k miles is certainly NOT "long in the tooth" for an engine that OTR truckers regularly get a million miles on. That's just over 7000 miles/year, about average. Another thing would be to look at older units to see how they have held up. Most RV's are built to a price point, IOW as cheaply as they can sell them. Newells, as a few others, are built differently. Newells are all custom built to the owners specs. Most of them weren't looking for a bargain apparently. I've previously owned a '93 and '98 Newell and found them to be very solidly built coaches, certainly in the very top of quality. I currently own a 36' 1999 Foretravel mainly because Newell builds mostly 45' coaches and we wanted smaller for our Alaska trip. Newell is still privately owned and has great factory support. A great forum to get info and answers is www.newellgurus.com
And remember like all others maintenance and records are very important.
Good luck in your search.

Big Katuna

Deland, FL

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Posted: 07/19/19 09:58am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

It’s all about trade offs to me. I’ve had two gas coaches and bought a new DP in 2005.

Some rhetorical questions to provoke thought.

Are you going out west in the Rockies?

Do you like getting off the Interstate and driving US highways and county roads?

Do you like older state parks with lots of shade or prefer wide open RV Resorts?

Are you going to be driving often, move around often or sit for a few months at a time?

Class Cs weigh about 15K lbs, are under 11’ tall and almost all shops will work on them; it’s a van. All the dash electronics, AC, sheet metal, electric windows. Simple and reliable. You can pull off the road and not sink in. Driver comfort not as good as DP.
But they fit in low clearances and are comfortable on backroads. And Billy Bob can work on them.

Class A gas weigh low 20s and over 11’ tall. The drivability I’m sure is way better than my old gas chassis. A friend bought a 2000 F53 drove it 15 years with few problems; brakes, belts, maintenance. They traded for a new 2016 F53, six speed night and day better than the 2000.

A DP weighs in at 30K lbs and up. I’m parked next a Winnebago Tour, a 43’ monster. I looked it up and it’s over 50K lbs. Pull off on the shoulder in THAT and see what happens. A DP drives way better. It’s quieter, engine braking downhill is great. I rarely use my foot brake. When new, maintenance amounts to annual oil and lube.
Wait till they get older like my 2005 and things start breaking. Everything costs way more. Finding places that work on DPs is easy. Finding GOOD places to work on them is another story. Expect to pay $125/hr AND UP for labor.
I’ve had two ride ht valves replaced $400 a pop, belts and tensioner $600. A high pressure pump failure can costs thousands.


My Kharma ran over my Dogma.

Bird Freak

Dallas Ga.

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Posted: 07/19/19 09:58am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Tom/Barb wrote:

mike brez wrote:

Get This One and call it a day.


yeah that ! beautiful !

but a little long in the tooth. (138k miles).
On a Detroit 138K is almost broke in.


Eddie
03 Fleetwood Pride, 36-5L
04 Ford F-250 Superduty
15K Pullrite Superglide
Old coach 04 Pace Arrow 37C with brakes sometimes.
Owner- The Toy Shop-
Auto Restoration and Customs 32 years. Retired by a stroke!
We love 56 T-Birds

way2roll

Wilmington NC

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Posted: 07/19/19 10:40am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Big Katuna wrote:

It’s all about trade offs to me. I’ve had two gas coaches and bought a new DP in 2005.

Some rhetorical questions to provoke thought.

Are you going out west in the Rockies?

Do you like getting off the Interstate and driving US highways and county roads?

Do you like older state parks with lots of shade or prefer wide open RV Resorts?

Are you going to be driving often, move around often or sit for a few months at a time?

Class Cs weigh about 15K lbs, are under 11’ tall and almost all shops will work on them; it’s a van. All the dash electronics, AC, sheet metal, electric windows. Simple and reliable. You can pull off the road and not sink in. Driver comfort not as good as DP.
But they fit in low clearances and are comfortable on backroads. And Billy Bob can work on them.

Class A gas weigh low 20s and over 11’ tall. The drivability I’m sure is way better than my old gas chassis. A friend bought a 2000 F53 drove it 15 years with few problems; brakes, belts, maintenance. They traded for a new 2016 F53, six speed night and day better than the 2000.

A DP weighs in at 30K lbs and up. I’m parked next a Winnebago Tour, a 43’ monster. I looked it up and it’s over 50K lbs. Pull off on the shoulder in THAT and see what happens. A DP drives way better. It’s quieter, engine braking downhill is great. I rarely use my foot brake. When new, maintenance amounts to annual oil and lube.
Wait till they get older like my 2005 and things start breaking. Everything costs way more. Finding places that work on DPs is easy. Finding GOOD places to work on them is another story. Expect to pay $125/hr AND UP for labor.
I’ve had two ride ht valves replaced $400 a pop, belts and tensioner $600. A high pressure pump failure can costs thousands.


All valid points. We've owned a C and 2 A's to date. The A's were bought new and rather entry level. But that worked for us in the past. We do like state parks and not warm and fuzzy on parking lot type CG's. We typically shop around for a KOA type CG. However, that was fun weekend type trips and a totally different plan and purpose. Our thought is to tour coast to coast, starting low and looping high and zig zag in between. Without time constraints we thought we'd have sort of a high level plan and figure it out as we go. Likely staying in places for a week at a time (I'll still be working) and moving weekly or every other week. Drive times preferably will be 6 hrs per day or under - depending on where we go from place to place. National parks are on the list. So with all that in mind, a nice gasser would certainly do. However, this will be our full time home, at least for 2-4 years. Driving the gassers, despite being new and the myriad of mods I've done, I am worn out at the end of a driving shift, and the noise is hard to hold a conversation. Also full timing will require a lot more stuff, so capacity is definitely a consideration. I think for these reasons a DP is our primary focus. That or a super C, but we have only looked at those for the sake of DW's comfort level in driving - which she never does.

As we will be selling our house, we plan on having a lot in reserves for maintenance, repairs and issues. $125-175k is our budget. Technically I could spend 2-3x that, but we don't need that level of coach and I'd rather have the funds on hand and not be coach poor.

Where we plan to travel makes me think a 36-40' coach will get us in most places we want to be. We don't plan on doing a lot of dry camping. We also plan on having a toad. Currently we have a CRV and it works, but we may move to a larger one if we have the capacity and it fits the budget - but since it's already set up we may run it until it makes sense to trade it.

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