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 > A new trend in RV fridges?

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3lephant

Los Angeles

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Posted: 08/04/19 01:49am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

If you are using a residential fridge in your RV then you may need to have a separate battery and inverter also. Because you have to give 120V current to the residential fridge.


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* This post was edited 08/05/19 09:20am by 3lephant *

landyacht318

Near a large body of salty water

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Posted: 08/04/19 02:49am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Danfoss compressors are variable speed. The bd35f is 2000 to 3500 rpm. 2.7 to ~6.5 amps.

The bd-50 is for bigger fridges. More amp draw, not sure exactly how much. But it is also variable speed, variable amp draw, determined by resistance on the thermostat circuit.

Blanket statements are unwise. Makes every sentence surrounding them suspect and easily dismissable as the ravings of an uninformed half wit.

I have a small 1.8 cubic foot fridge. Averaged 0.62 ah consumed each hour over 3 days in average 75f temps, the last time I bothered recording actual data.

I have a 800 watt msw inverter. It consumes 0.68 amps simply turned on.....powering nothing.

My inverter turned on, powering nothing, therefore consumes more than my fridge does on average, over the same time span.

As for propane fridges..... i stuffed 8 12 oz 78f cheap american beers in my danfoss powered compressor fridge at 4:30pm. At 7:45 they were ice cold.
Good luck achieving that with an absorption fridge.

Can't imagine worrying about propane level to keep food from spoiling. Or having to park nearly level. Or the electrics monitoring an absorption fridge using more than my compressor fridge, or an inverter on standby waiting for a residential compressor to fire up, using more than the my small danfoss powered fridge itself consumes over the same time period.

This thread has become ridiculous.
Your opinions are delusional. Mine are fact.
hahahwahwwwhahahhaahahaa.

Seee? Ridiculous!

pnichols

The Other California

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Posted: 08/04/19 05:20pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

landyacht318 wrote:

Danfoss compressors are variable speed. The bd35f is 2000 to 3500 rpm. 2.7 to ~6.5 amps.

The bd-50 is for bigger fridges. More amp draw, not sure exactly how much. But it is also variable speed, variable amp draw, determined by resistance on the thermostat circuit.

Blanket statements are unwise. Makes every sentence surrounding them suspect and easily dismissable as the ravings of an uninformed half wit.

I have a small 1.8 cubic foot fridge. Averaged 0.62 ah consumed each hour over 3 days in average 75f temps, the last time I bothered recording actual data.

I have a 800 watt msw inverter. It consumes 0.68 amps simply turned on.....powering nothing.

My inverter turned on, powering nothing, therefore consumes more than my fridge does on average, over the same time span.

As for propane fridges..... i stuffed 8 12 oz 78f cheap american beers in my danfoss powered compressor fridge at 4:30pm. At 7:45 they were ice cold.
Good luck achieving that with an absorption fridge.

Can't imagine worrying about propane level to keep food from spoiling. Or having to park nearly level. Or the electrics monitoring an absorption fridge using more than my compressor fridge, or an inverter on standby waiting for a residential compressor to fire up, using more than the my small danfoss powered fridge itself consumes over the same time period.

This thread has become ridiculous.
Your opinions are delusional. Mine are fact.
hahahwahwwwhahahhaahahaa.

Seee? Ridiculous!


Hmmmm ... your's is an awful small refrig -> so it better not draw much current when cycled ON.

Our 6.2 cubic foot 120V AC/propane refrig draws only about 0.50 amp each hour when running on propane ... but of course it cycles ON and OFF ... so this 0.50 amp draw is only part-time. We like fresh food - as opposed to canned and/or dry packaged foods - and as such our size refrig gets us by for up to 2 weeks. It's freezer can be run slightly less than zero degrees or slightly more than zero degrees depending on how I set it's 5-position control switch.

We don't worry about propane level keeping food cold, because A) we have 60 lbs. of propane, and B) either our built-in generator or backup portable generator can of course alternatively power the refrigerator in it's 120V AC mode.

As far as "being level" is concerned, A) we want to park/camp level anyway for comfort, and B) RV manufacturers could easily offer a propane refrigerator option in which the unit was mounted on a gimbal so that it would ALWAYS be kept level.

So far after around 13 years, our RV's Norcold refrigerator has been performing as the great invention it is - as per this expert: https://www.wired.com/story/einsteins-li........le-known-passion-project-a-refrigerator/


Phil, 2005 E450 Itasca Spirit 24V

BFL13

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Posted: 08/04/19 05:36pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Everybody except me is different. I am the only one who is the same.


1991 Oakland 28DB Class C
on Ford E350-460-7.5 Gas EFI
See Profile for House electronics set-up.

stevemorris

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Posted: 08/04/19 06:09pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

great discussion, there are advantages to every system

BUT the dealer we visited only had trailers with compressor fridges. all of his medium to large trailers(24 ft and up) had them

no propane fridges

I don't want to be limited to 120V hookups, generators or solar. I told the sales guy that, and he said that's where the industry is going(he likely doesn't have a clue!)


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crosscheck

Coldstream, BC

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Posted: 08/04/19 09:36pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

stevemorris wrote:

great discussion, there are advantages to every system

BUT the dealer we visited only had trailers with compressor fridges. all of his medium to large trailers(24 ft and up) had them

no propane fridges

I don't want to be limited to 120V hookups, generators or solar. I told the sales guy that, and he said that's where the industry is going(he likely doesn't have a clue!)


Our camping style is "dry", 98% of the time. I try not to use the term "boondocking" because it means so many different things to so many RVers. No power pole, no water outlet, no sewer outlet. "Dry" camping. Pretty simple. We had a 7.5cuft NovaKool fridge/freezer, with Danfoss compressor for 5 years in our TC that when cycling, used 4.4A. This is not a "residential" unit and is similarily priced to the absorbsion fridges.
If you dry camp for any length of time and have a normal battery bank of 2 X12V, you will have to replace the AH's you use by one method or another no matter what type of fridge you have.

Before choising a compressor fridge in our TC, I read the stories of the RV campers who really do dry camp most of the time and have a bigger electrical footprint because of the all electric fridge and the way they all seem to have no problems with their "dry" camping style was to go solar, increase battery bank, decrease electrical consumption by LED's, changing over high electrical units like TV's to modern, low electronic consumption ones, very basic changes. We have a genny and have not run it in 5 years while keeping a "dry" camping style.

Traditional RV fridges work. They will still be offered by manufacturers. But because of the changes in technology in the last 20 or so years regarding batteries, solar, LED lighting, generators etc, compressor fridges, which are used by almost 100% of the world for their fridge/freezer/cooling systems, are here to stay in the RV industry.

Dave


2016 F350 Diesel 4X4 CC SRW SB,
2016 Creekside 23RKS, 490W solar, 2000W Xantrex Freedom 2012 inverter, 4 6V GC-2 (450AH)
2006 F350 CC 4X4 sold
2011 Outfitter 9.5' sold
Some Of Our Fun:http://daveincoldstream.blogspot.ca/

paddykernahan

Westland, MI

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Posted: 08/05/19 12:02pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

crosscheck wrote:

stevemorris wrote:

great discussion, there are advantages to every system

BUT the dealer we visited only had trailers with compressor fridges. all of his medium to large trailers(24 ft and up) had them

no propane fridges

I don't want to be limited to 120V hookups, generators or solar. I told the sales guy that, and he said that's where the industry is going(he likely doesn't have a clue!)


Our camping style is "dry", 98% of the time. I try not to use the term "boondocking" because it means so many different things to so many RVers. No power pole, no water outlet, no sewer outlet. "Dry" camping. Pretty simple. We had a 7.5cuft NovaKool fridge/freezer, with Danfoss compressor for 5 years in our TC that when cycling, used 4.4A. This is not a "residential" unit and is similarily priced to the absorbsion fridges.
If you dry camp for any length of time and have a normal battery bank of 2 X12V, you will have to replace the AH's you use by one method or another no matter what type of fridge you have.

Before choising a compressor fridge in our TC, I read the stories of the RV campers who really do dry camp most of the time and have a bigger electrical footprint because of the all electric fridge and the way they all seem to have no problems with their "dry" camping style was to go solar, increase battery bank, decrease electrical consumption by LED's, changing over high electrical units like TV's to modern, low electronic consumption ones, very basic changes. We have a genny and have not run it in 5 years while keeping a "dry" camping style.

Traditional RV fridges work. They will still be offered by manufacturers. But because of the changes in technology in the last 20 or so years regarding batteries, solar, LED lighting, generators etc, compressor fridges, which are used by almost 100% of the world for their fridge/freezer/cooling systems, are here to stay in the RV industry.

Dave


I do not have the option to increase battery or solar on my unit.
Stuck with on 95 watt solar panel and two 6VDC batteries.





ajriding

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Posted: 08/16/19 08:22am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I just removed the propane fridge and am putting in the Danfoss-style chest.
[image]

I curious, really only from those with real-world experience (so who actually own and use one) how long the real battery charge last.
I have two 6-volt golf's under 200w solar.
I don't really use much power except for fans and charging phone and GPS unit. I use LED lights. -camper is for cooking and sleeping, nI don't spend any leisure time in it.

I have a 12 volt deep cycle battery in the garage and the ability to wire the 2 golf batt to run only the fridge and the one 12v to run the camper = two DC systems. I have 200 w solar and could add another 100w just for the one 12v battery.

Next trip is a long one so no shake-down test trip to test it out…

Bill.Satellite

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Posted: 08/17/19 05:09am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Yikes! Glad that will work for you but it would spell divorce or solo RVing for me!


What I post is my 2 cents and nothing more. Please don't read anything into my post that's not there. If you disagree, that's OK.
Can't we all just get along?

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