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 > A new trend in RV fridges?

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steveh27

Grosse Pointe Woods, MI

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Posted: 08/02/19 05:26am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Yesterday I sent Dometic a request to go back to making at least one model 3 way small fridge without electronic controls so when boondocking on propane it will not draw power from the house battery. My 1997 has a Dometic rM 2310 which does not draw power. But it's getting old & I had to repair it this summer. When I checked into replacements they drew so much power when on propane that I could not camp anymore. My Class B does not have a built in genny & I usually do not drag along my Honda 2000. I do have a portable solar panel which worked well in Fl for 33 days this winter, but that would not have kept up with the newer fridge draw. Hope mine holds together as I doubt Dometic will see the needs of a few boondockers.

vermilye

Oswego, NY, USA

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Posted: 08/02/19 08:02am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

steveh27 wrote:

Yesterday I sent Dometic a request to go back to making at least one model 3 way small fridge without electronic controls so when boondocking on propane it will not draw power from the house battery. My 1997 has a Dometic rM 2310 which does not draw power. But it's getting old & I had to repair it this summer. When I checked into replacements they drew so much power when on propane that I could not camp anymore. My Class B does not have a built in genny & I usually do not drag along my Honda 2000. I do have a portable solar panel which worked well in Fl for 33 days this winter, but that would not have kept up with the newer fridge draw. Hope mine holds together as I doubt Dometic will see the needs of a few boondockers.


While I loved my 2510 for the same reason, I currently have a 6 cu ft DM2663LBX. While it does draw some current to keep the gas valve open, it is well under 1 amp. I've done 91 days without hookups, although I do have a pair of 6V batteries & 320 watts of solar.


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BillyBob Jim

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Posted: 08/02/19 08:14am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

This is not a new trend, it started back after the recession when the RV manufacturers realized they can save quite a few up front dollars by using a residential fridge. Less installation labor, less materials for the cabinetry as you do not need to build the same type of enclosure, no venting provisions or vents needed, no gas line provisions, and the initial cost of the appliance is cheaper. All they had to do was add in a few feet of extra wiring and the cheapest inverter and battery they could find.

I have yet to see any of them come up with a new idea or design for anything that is not driven by "cheap" on the front end.

ajriding

st clair

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Posted: 08/02/19 08:48am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I would be interested in the statistics of how people camp.

I imagine most RV owners go from their house, take a short drive (under 2 hours) to a full hook-up campground, stay a few days, then return home. For this they do not need fancy refrigerators. I imagine it is more rare to boondock. I have also observed that RV owners will run their generator just to be able to play with it as a toy, even running it just to have one light lit up. It's like they do not know the battery will run a light, or they do not understand how that works, all they understand is household current. Thus, RV manufacturers will appeal to those buyers and offer campground RVs.

pnichols

The Other California

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Posted: 08/02/19 11:25am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

steveh27 wrote:

Yesterday I sent Dometic a request to go back to making at least one model 3 way small fridge without electronic controls so when boondocking on propane it will not draw power from the house battery. My 1997 has a Dometic rM 2310 which does not draw power. But it's getting old & I had to repair it this summer. When I checked into replacements they drew so much power when on propane that I could not camp anymore. My Class B does not have a built in genny & I usually do not drag along my Honda 2000. I do have a portable solar panel which worked well in Fl for 33 days this winter, but that would not have kept up with the newer fridge draw. Hope mine holds together as I doubt Dometic will see the needs of a few boondockers.


Once we had a Class C RV that even had a propane furnace that didn't require any electricity. I just lit it's pilot light at the beginning of the camping and the furnace went on and off automatically and heated the interior with radiant heat from the flame chamber. I can't remember exactly how it was vented, but I believe it had a vent tube going through an outside coach wall.

The coach lights were even propane - each light fixture operated just like the propane lanterns operate.

Those were the days!

* This post was edited 08/02/19 12:55pm by pnichols *


Phil, 2005 E450 Itasca Spirit 24V

wa8yxm

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Posted: 08/02/19 03:16pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

There are advantages to Residential (household) Fridges. I had on in my Trailer days (Small one) it was nice but for the Class A I like the Absorption unit.

Advantages of residential. Off level. don't matter. 100 in teh shade. Still works. NO PROPANE (Some folks are afraid of propane) Slightly more room inside.

Disadvantage No 120vac. No work To me.. That's a biggie.


Home is where I park it.
Kenwood TS-2000 housed in a 2005 Damon Intruder 377


Planning

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Posted: 08/02/19 03:57pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

ajriding wrote:

I would be interested in the statistics of how people camp.

I imagine most


"Imagining" and "most" are not synonyms for data.

Based upon forum reading I could easily think that I am in a minority: We never call our 5th wheel a "camper", nor do we do what is typically described as "camping". We have only "dry-camped once overnight because the park shut their water off to prevent freezing. We still had electric and sewer capability, and one fresh water fill available so we could top off the 75 gallon fresh water tank. (One night with only 75 gallons was close, but we made it[emoticon])

We use our RV to approximate as many residential comforts and luxuries as possible, using it as our "hotel" for travel purposes. (We invariably use full-hookup RV facilities, and have done so for trips of 3 months or longer.)

From reading on forums, it seems as if many more people choose a more austere and rustic type of RVing.

Nonetheless, all of this is anecdotal and we could actually be in majority rather than what it seems to us.


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toedtoes

California

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Posted: 08/02/19 04:39pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I think it's pretty equal in whether folks RV or camp. And many folks do a bit of both.

P.S. "Dry camping" is without electrical hookups. If you are connected to shore power, you are not dry camping.

And that wording discrepancy also makes trying to create statistical data out of forum posts impossible. When everyone defines a type of camping/RVing differently, you cannot be sure what they mean.

And the type of rig doesn't help either. I hear from popup owners stating that they always have full hookups and there are class A folks who rarely have hookups.


1975 American Clipper RV with Dodge 360 (photo in profile)
1998 American Clipper Fold n Roll Folding Trailer
Both born in Morgan Hill, CA to Irv Perch (Daddy of the Aristocrat trailers)

pnichols

The Other California

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Posted: 08/02/19 05:35pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Planning wrote:

ajriding wrote:

I would be interested in the statistics of how people camp.

I imagine most


"Imagining" and "most" are not synonyms for data.

Based upon forum reading I could easily think that I am in a minority: We never call our 5th wheel a "camper", nor do we do what is typically described as "camping". We have only "dry-camped once overnight because the park shut their water off to prevent freezing. We still had electric and sewer capability, and one fresh water fill available so we could top off the 75 gallon fresh water tank. (One night with only 75 gallons was close, but we made it[emoticon])

We use our RV to approximate as many residential comforts and luxuries as possible, using it as our "hotel" for travel purposes. (We invariably use full-hookup RV facilities, and have done so for trips of 3 months or longer.)

From reading on forums, it seems as if many more people choose a more austere and rustic type of RVing.

Nonetheless, all of this is anecdotal and we could actually be in majority rather than what it seems to us.


Well, we use our RV to approximate as many residential comforts and luxuries as possible too. However, we like this style anywhere - drycamping out in the boondocks (middle of nowhere) for a few days, drycamping in a campground with no hookups for a few days, and FHU "camping" in a luxury campground for no longer than absolutely necessary.

As such, we try to keep our RV ready for these kind of scenarios - plenty of gasoline, plenty of propane, plenty of fresh water, plenty of grey/black liquid storage capacity, generous furnace capacity, generous air conditioning capacity, and 4-5 different ways of recharging the coach batteries with no sun required.

We want to be glamping whenever we're camping - that's why we bought a self-contained RV - that also works with FHU.

MEXICOWANDERER

las peƱas, michoacan, mexico

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Posted: 08/02/19 05:44pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I am convinced many RVs are sold to seniors, driven from the dealer to a resort-like RV park, hooked up and there they stay. Rv manufacturers tend to lend credibility to this guess. Let someone else worry about stuff. Golf, cocktails, and the Elks Club for recreation.

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